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Full text of "S.F. Newsletter (July-Dec. 1901)"

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U California Stale Ubraty ^.^RARY. 



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Prlca par copy, 10 cml» 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1S5«. 



Annual Subaerlptlon, $4.00 



NE^ S IfETTER 

(£alif JimuO^toertx sex. 




Volume LXIII. 



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SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 6, 1901. 



Printed and published every Salnrday by the proprietor, FRBD 
MARRIOTT. o l a Kearny stnet, San Franc. sco. Kntercd at San Frwn- 
clsco Posto:' la>* matter. 

The office of the S. F. NKWS LETTER in London, Eng., is Ht 80 Cornhill 
London, England, el & Co., Representatives!, where 

Information may be obtained regarding subscriptions and advertising 
rate*. Paris, France— Office. No. 37 Avenue de L'Opera. 

All social items, announcements. Advertising or other matter, intended for 
publication in the current number of the NKWS LETTER should be 
sent to this office not later than 6 p.m. Thursday. 

Emperor William won but one race in the Kiel regatta. 
ral trials for lese majeste are next in order. 



A man in Los Angeles drank a glass of beer the other day 
and immediately dropped dead. Moral: Don't drink beer 
— the Los Angeles kind. 



The Chinese have made our firecrackers for a long while, 
and now they are delivering our Fourth of July orations. 
Turn Georges picture to the wall. 



The Social Democrats' poetic scheme to petition the city 
for a $3,500,000 "People's Palace" does not require the seal 
of the party to betray its origin. 



To render Hawaii a county of California might make our 
State the largest on earth; but heavens! what a job it 
would be to skip across the county line. 



Brethren, count your eyes and your noses, your fingers 
and your toes and say whether patriotism has diminished 
since last Fourth of July. 



The Duke of Yarmouth is not the only high-class wine- 
merchant. King Edwai-d VII is selling his private stock of 
sherry at £20 a dozen. This is not an advertisement. 



"Bill the Borer" is the name the police have given the 
burglar who has been operating so successfully in this 
town lately. "Bill the Borrower" would be a better name. 



Those who complain of hot weather in San Francisco 
should be obliged to summer in Chicago or New York long 
enough to learn that our summer is the mildest in the 
world. 



And an automobile shall lead them. For the first time in 
thirty years the French and German flags were intertwined 
last week at Berlin, the automobile race from Paris to that 
city being the occasion. 



Lieutenant J. D. Taylor also claims a share in the capture 
of Aguinaldo, thus adding another name to the number of 
army officers who are not ashamed of having been mixed 
up in the affair. 



If Dr. Dodge's $100,000,000 increase in the city assessment 
was accomplished as he says it was, through lightening the 
burden on the masses, it looks as if the assessor had dis- 
covered a golden age for San Francisco. 



The last regiments of the United States Volunteers have 
been disbanded in our midst this week. Nearly a million and 
a quarter of dollars has been distributed among the men for 
back pay. Can you wonder that the gVoggeries of upper 
Kearny street have laid in an extra choice stock of knock- 
cut drops for the Fourth of July trade, or that the em- 
ployers of the State are looking forward to plenty of cheap 
laborers this summer? 



119761 



Number 1. 



There are over Bil hundred thousand applications on file 
at Washington for pensions. If they are all granted, the war 
revenue will have to be restored. 



A mob has tried for the second time to do violence to 
George Suesser, .who killed Sheriff Farley, of Monterey 
County, nearly two years ago. Suesser would probably be 
glad to be hanged and safely out of the way. 



"Heeler" Schlatter perished of heat and thirst while mak- 
ing a pilgrimage across the desert near Los Angeles. Won't 
some one suggest to Faith Fakist Dowie that by a similar 
trip he can do lots of good? 



As Mr. William Waldorf Astor's recent big musicale in 
London attests, members of the British aristocracy have 
restored the ex-patriot in his capacity as public entertainer. 
The affair cost $15,000. London society must be very lan- 
guid this summer. 



The New York Churchman suggets that clergymen com- 
bine their profession with that of the physician. An eco- 
nomical plan. A certain percentage of preachers, however, 
should in such an- event, learn to be undertakers in order 
to meet the increased demand. 



On a Honolulu track a ring of sharpers attempted to drug 
the crack racer of Prince David of the Hawaiian royal 
family. Result: Prince David's horse won, the would-be 
swindlers lost several thousand dollars to the Kanaka 
nobleman and the gang is now in jail awaiting trial. This 
event will probably cause a slump in gilded bricks in the 
Hawaiian markets. 



Mr. John Elbert, who has been appointed business man- 
ager for the City and County Hospital, has declared an' era 
of reform. Cleanliness and order will be the rute, he says. 
Well, everybody knows that the City and County Hospital 
will stand a deal of reforming, and there are some un- 
charitable enough to predict that Mr. Elbert will earn his 
salary if he keeps his promise. 



Howard Tuttle didn't commit suicide. He got drunk and 
went to Fresno. He says he doesn't remember putting the 
note on his father's door announcing his contemplated suicide 
and that he must have been very, very drunk. You were, 
Howard, also very, very crazy. Your father has the heart- 
felt sympathy of the entire community in this, his sad 
affliction — your return. 



A wild-voiced jingo yell over a British flag raised in 
Skaguay would have had the two nations involved in a 
territorial war, if anybody had listened to it. The flag 
was raised above a customs house and was simply intended 
, as a trade-mark. Fortunately the British and American 
Governments are in the hands of sane men, so no harm 
is done. 



It looks as though Rev. Charles G. Adams, of Berkeley, 
who murdered Dr. John G. Jessup, will escape with light 
punishment or none at all. The Coroner's jury of that sup- 
posed-to-be-enlightened town found no fault at all with the 
leverened gentleman's act. Robert Edgar, Justice of the 
Peace in Berkeley, has reluctantly held him to appear on 
the charge of manslaughter. In line with these precedents, 
we may expect the Superior Court to- convict him of dis- 
turbing the peace. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



July 6, 1901. 



A CHANGE FOR THE BETTER. 

Several thousand soldiers were mustered out in San Fran- 
cisco this week, and the volunteer is a thing of the past. 
Most of them have been in San Francisco twice, once on their 
way to the Philippines, and now on their return. We have 
had more experience with soldiers than any city in the 
United States, and some that are not pleasant to recall. 
San Francisco has been subjected to all sorts of annoyances 
by the rowdyism of troops, and cannot be blamed for being 
apprehensive of the result that would follow turning thou- 
sands of men loose with plenty of money. But the fears 
proved groundless this time. Though over one and a half 
million dollars were paid out to the soldiers within less 
than a week, there has been no disorder. Most of the men 
quietly bought tickets and started for their homes the other 
side of the Mississippi. It is a gratifying change from their 
former behavior, and has done a great deal to remove the 
prejudice felt here against Uncle Sam's fighting men. 

It has been noted that these men had a far healthier ap- 
pearance than most of the returning troops — a condition due, 
probably, ,to the fact that experience has taught those in 
Jiuthority many things in regard to the care of men that 
they did not know when they first went to the Philippines. 
The negro troops stood the climate there remarkably well. 



PLANT SHADE TREES. 

The present terribly heated term m the East, and the 
frightful loss of life resulting therefrom, are going to 
force an animated and serious discussion as to what can 
be done to protect pedestrians from the direct rays of the 
summer's sun in our large cities. When a person feels like 
being overcome by the heat, he or she ought to be able 
to stand aside in a shaded place, until recovered. This con- 
sideration points at once to the great value of shade trees, 
which not only afford protection from the sun's rays, but 
induce breezes which would not otherwise exist. Paris, 
that delights in everything calculated to add to its comfort 
and attractiveness, is reported to have planted half a mil- 
lion shade trees within the past decade, and she spends 
$100,000 a year to keep them in order and to plant new 
ones. Every street for a certain width is entitled to a row 
of trees on either side, while every street of a certain greater 
width gets a double row. The cities of Italy sometimes go 
further than Paris in this matter. They take infinite pains 
to train the young growing trees in such a way as to afford 
the largest possible area of shade. It says little for the 
vaunted enterprise of our wealthy Eastern cities that they 
have not long since patterned after these well-known and 
successful examples. Viewed merely from the esthetic stand- 
point, there is every reason why our American cities should 
give greater attention to tree planting. We should do so in 
San Francisco, although we have not here the same pressing 
need for shade that they have in the East. 



A PACIFIC CABLE. 



Great Britain, Canada and Australia acting together, have 
let a contract for the laying of a cable from Vancouver, via 
Fanning Island, and Fiji, to Australia, whence there is al- 
ready connection with New Zealand, Tasmania, and other 
surrounding places. The distance is 7,100 miles, and the con- 
tract price about $6,000,000. The cable is to be ready for 
business on or before July 1st of next year. It is condi- 
tioned between the parties that the service shall be open to 
all countries on equal terms, exception, of course, being 
made against any country that may be at war with the Em- 
pire. Fanning Island is only a few miles south of Honolulu, 
and is little more than a barren rock. Yet on it the New 
Pacific cable is to be landed, and in time it will likely be- 
come the most important telegraph station in the Pacific 
Already it is proposed to connect Fanning Island with Yoko- 
hama, and there meet the telegraphic systems of the world 
It is very much to be regretted that the United States did 
not see fit to join their three Anglo-Saxon friends and cus- 
tomers in owning and controlling the cable, which tor many 
long years to come, we fear, will he the only one across the 
Pacific. Our interests would certainly have been advanced 
thereby. If it be not too late, it would even yet be worth our 
while to "stand in," and get the route so changed as to take 



in Hawaii and the Philippines. We are satisfied that such 
is the disposition of Great Britain and her self-governing 
Colonies toward the country that we could get the concession 
for the asking. It would be the easiest, cheapest and best 
way to solve the Pacific cable problem with which Congress 
has worried for the past three or four sessions. The truth 
is that we have not the plant with which to build and lay a 
long deep sea cable. It would take us two or three years to 
supply ourselves with one, and its cost would not be less 
than that for which the Britishers will lay their new cable 
complete. It should be borne in mind that it is our own 
fault that Hawaii has been given the go-by. The Colonies 
desired and intended that Hawaii should be a landing place, 
and applied to President Dole's Government for permission, 
but were refused at the instance, it is believed, of our own 
Government. It is a regrettable incident, about which the 
least said the soonest mended. Let us get into the scramble 
for Pacific cables, anyway. We need them for commerce. 



"GO THOU AND DO LIKEWISE." 
One would hardly look to Chicago for an example such as 
has been set by Mr. Frank G. Logan, a millionaire stock- 
broker, who has retired from business at the early age 
of fifty with the announcement that he has enough money 
and proposes to enjoy in leisure the fruit of his toil. He has 
set an example that should be followed. 

Mr. Logan has been in the harness for twenty-five years, 
and his present act is in accordance with a promise that 
he made himself years ago. He will be lucky if he has not 
allowed business to get such a hold on him as to kill his 
taste for enjoyment. It may be that by this time he has 
forgotten that there are other things besides money in the 
world which money can buy. It is to be hoped, though, 
that he will get so much fun out of his remaining years 
on earth that other business men will be tempted to 
follow in his footsteps, unharness and give others a chance. 
The British are wiser than we in this matter, and England 
is full of millionaires who have nothing to do but spend their 
wealth. 

There are many besides Mr. Logan who can be spared 
from the business arena. When a great artist, musician, 
scientist, writer, or public man ceases his labors the world 
is the loser. The work of such men is of benefit to human- 
ity, and they should be encouraged to keep at it as long as 
possible. In fact, so wrongly is appreciation applied, from 
a financial standpoint, they are compelled in most cases 
to die still fighting. But the money-maker's place can gen- 
erally be filled by some one not only able but willing to step 
into his shoes. 



A PLAIN CASE. 



The several weeks between now and the suit of Mrs. 
Clara Kluge-Sutro against the heirs of the Sutro estate will 
be busy ones for the defendants. Knowing as they do, that 
they have a hopeless case, as far as justice is concerned, 
they are endeavoring in every way to discover technicali- 
ties and flaws, and to devise ways to delay the action as long 
i»s possible. This latter has been their course all along, but 
Judge Patterson, Mrs. Kluge-Sutro's attorney, has deter- 
mined to have a speedy hearing of the case. It has been set 
for August 15th, and a hard battle is promised. The Sutro 
heirs are determined to hold on to what they have, denying 
positively that Mrs. Kluge-Sutro has any claim whatever on 
the estate, while the latter is equally determined to have 
what she and her children are entitled to. She tried by 
every m<eans in her power to bring about a compromise in 
order to avoid court notoriety, offering to settle with the 
heirs on the most liberal terms. They refused every offer. 
As it now appears, they will find in the end that a compro- 
mise would have been far cheaper. 

There can be but one outcome to the trial. The lady who 
is bringing this suit was acknowledged as the wife of Mr. 
Adolph Sutro. He introduced her to his friends as such, 
and proclaimed the children his own. Legally they are as 
much entitled to part of the estate as are Mr. futro's chil- 
dren by his divorced wife. 

There have been few similar cases in San Francisco where 
public sympathy has been so pronouncedly on the side of the 
plaintiff. 



July 6. 1901. 



• AN FRANCIfiCO NEWS LETTER. 



WHAT HAS BECOME OF THE COMMERCIAL MUSEUM? 

The Philadelphia Record says of the commercial museum 
of that city that "during lis brief tenure nf exlstem" II nan 
sdvertleed the city and the State In every mart of traffic the 
world over." A commercial museum in San Francisco would 
do the same thing fur California and the entire Pacific 
CoasL The people who come to this point from the various 
countries that confront us should he taught the habit nf buy- 
ing here, and that can be done by showing them that they 
can get here all they want. San Francisco should have n com- 
merclal museum as attractive as any In the world. We have), 
i.r can iiave. all the materials to make it so. We had hoped 
that by this time such a museum would have been opened 
to the public. More than two years ago the project was 
mooted, and seemed to take definite shape. Our mercan- 
tile bodies appeared very much in earnest for a time, and 
may be so still, for aught we know, but the indications are 
not as reassuring as they might be. Perhaps our traders 
have been so busy that the enterprise had to be put off to a 
more convenient season. What, however, is happening, is 
that our merchants, each in his own particular line, are mak- 
ing their own establishments veritable museums. Premises 
have been enlarged, stocks increased, displays rendered more 
attractive, and our wholesale houses are carrying lines of 
goods that give promise of an early and successful competi- 
tion with New York for, at least, the trade of our own ocean. 
That is the achievement that is before our business men, 
and it is a hopeful sign that they are beginning to realize 
that it is. We should like to see them, however, reproduce 
the Philadelphia museum in this city. Visitors would not 
then have to hire a guide and travel all over the city in order 
to see what we have to sell. 



MONOPOLIZING THE SALT OF THE WHOLE EARTH. 

It appears that the salt of the whole earth is about to 
pass under the control of a single corporation. It is the 
latest thing in trusts, which have only little further to go 
in order to control the earth itself. The operations of the 
company will be carried on throughout the Western hemis- 
phere, and will extend not only over Europe but also embrace 
Japan, Cnina, and the continents of Asia and Africa. The 
Salt Union of England already monopolizes the business of 
supplying salt in Great Britain and her colonies, the Cana- 
dian Salt Company controls the trade in the Dominion, while 
the National Company takes care of this country. By com- 
bining these it is proposed to establish the most comprehen- 
sive monopoly the world has yet known, and that in an arti- 
cle essential to the very existence of human life. The salt 
tax imposed by various Governments at one time or another, 
has long been abolished in most civilized countries, and 
where it has remained it is a synonym for benighted and 
odious taxation. But if this great combination is not to be 
checked by either legislation or public opinion it would seem 
that a universal salt tax is about to De levied on the human 
race. The one consolation is that at present there are no 
known means of monopolizing the ocean, which contains 
salt enough for all purposes. Probably it could not be profit- 
ably extracted in competition with the trust, but if the 
worst came to the worst, we might nave bounties for salt, 
as we recently had for sugar. 



STREET CARS AND STREET SIGNS. 

The Board of Aldermen of New York City are just now 
wrestling with two new ordinances, the operation of which 
will not be without interest here in San Francisco. One pro- 
poses to secure a more uniform system of street signs on 
business houses, and the other has for its object the regu- 
lation of street railway traffic. Members of the Municipal 
Art Society are preparing designs for street signs to replace 
those now in existence, which are said to be "glaring, start- 
ling, and a jumble of confusion." This description applies 
to more places than New York. It pretty closely fits the con- 
dition of things along the principal streets of San Francisco. 
Said a visiting Congressman the other day to a friend who 
was driving him out along Market street: "If San Francisco 
contains as many saints as it does signs, it must be a heav- 
enly place to dwell in!" The alliteration is good, but the 
application is distinctly bad. We do not expect, or want to 
be a "City of Saints." Our reputation of being "the Paris 



of America" would suffer nut we desire to M»e our atoro 
front* and sidewalks leas unsightly than they are. Our 
street signs should be more of an ornament and less of a 
disfigurement. They should be more modest, more uniform, 
and more securely fastened than many of them now are. 
Our City Fathers should keep step with progress In this mat 
to regard to the regulation of street railway traffic. 
New York is in dead earnest it is a huge city in which the 
overcrowding of street ™r» ims become intolerable. 

■ entt occur during almost every hour of the day and bite 
Into the night. The public demand is Insistent for more ac- 
commodations and belter regulation. Two propositions ap- 
pear to be more or less in favor. One Is to permit no com- 
pany to carry more passengers than It has seating accommo 
dations for. and the other is to run cars during certain hours 
of the day "for women only." It Is urged that it Is not pos- 
sible to prevent overcrowding by men whose situations de 
pend upon their being at their offices on time. As In San 
Francisco, so in New York, women will persist in staying 
('own town shopping until the stream of business men Is 
homeward bound. It is claimed that separate cars for 
women would change this. They would probably go home 
earlier, or in any event, they need not overcrowd each other. 



OUR TRADE WITH SOUTH AMERICA. 

Germany's trade with South America last year was $151,- 
000,000, while the United States' trade with the same coun- 
tries amounted to only $116,000,000. It must be admitted 
that this country has not yet distinguished itself in secur- 
ing the people of Latin America as customers. Yet it Ib a 
great many years since the late Secretary Blaine started to 
take in all Americans, and is this not the year of the Pan- 
American Exposition, at which we were to exhibit all that we 
have accomplished meanwhile? South Americans do not 
seem to be rushing to Buffalo to any appreciable extent, nor 
do we seem to be exhibiting anything there that they are 
anxious to buy. That is just where much of the difficulty 
comes in. We do not sufficiently cater to the tastes and re- 
quirements of the South American markets. We do not put 
up goods in their way, and they will not buy those put up in 
ours. We send drummers along with samples, but Spanish- 
Americans like to do their own sampling. That is to say, 
they are suspicious traders, and prefer to see that the bulk 
corresponds with the sample. Hence, British and German 
merchants establish branch houses, fill them with goods es- 
pecially prepared for the market, send a responsible agent 
who speaks the language, and employ, wherever possible, 
expert natives of the country as salesmen. They give long 
credit because it is the custom of the country, and are more 
than ready to accept local products in payment, in lieu of 
coin. They buy as well as sell, and that is the essence of 
good trading. Bills of exchange are drawn directly on Lon- 
don and Berlin, and rarely on New York. Banking facilities, 
the great need of the country, are supplied by our competi- 
tors, but we do not imitate them. If we would do a large 
South American trade, we must go after it and mean busi- 
ness. 



ANOTHER CLAIMANT IN THE FIELD. 

One more after a share of the late Senator Fair's millions. 
This time it is a daughter of the younger Mr. James Fair, 
who, those interested assert, was married by contract to 
the mother. The young lady is fourteen years old, and why 
she has been kept in the background all this time is a 
mystery. A Mrs. A. Jacobs, of Sacramento, tells a dime 
novel story about an infant girl being brought to her. 
Shortly afterward the paternity of the child was acknowl- 
edged by the Senator's eldest son, who paid thirty dollars 
a month for her support. After the alleged father died 
Senator Fair paid the money while he lived — so Mrs. Jacobs 
says. 

The younger Mr. James Fair died in 1892. Senator Fair 
has been dead for several years, and his estate is on the 
point of distribution. Yet these people have just remem- 
bered that the child is entitled to some of the money. They 
must have been taking lessons of Mrs. Craven, who, having 
exhausted all other tricks, begins to hint darkly of another 
heir, a child of Senator Fair. The whole thing has a comic 
opera sound. 



SAN FRANCI3C0 NEW8 LETTER. 



July 6, 1901. 



BUILDINGS THAT INDICATE PROSPERITY. 

There has been much talk for a long time of the "era of 
prosperity" that "was to strike San Francisco some day. 
Has it occurred to any one that it is here now? For surely 
these are prosperous days. There is a large strike on, to 
be sure, but it was not the consequence of hard times. The 
quietness of it and the seeming indifference of the mechan- 
ics as to whether or not they go back to work indicates 
other employment or money on hand. Though it is over a 
month since they walked out there has been no act of vio- 
lence, no attempt to win by force. TEey seem confident that 
their erstwhile employers will have to take them back, and 
are apparently willing to wait. 

The foregoing might seem like trying to "snatch victory 
from defeat," were it not for the fact that there are other 
evidences — more tangible — of present and future prosper- 
ity. The amount of building going on is a good barometer 
of financial weather, and at present it holds out most cheer- 
ing promises. The Alvinza Hayward building, nearly com- 
pleted, is a magnificent structure. The Merchants' Ex- 
change's new home will soon be a reality. " The Blythe prop- 
erty will shortly be covered by a building of which any city 
might be proud. Work is being pushed as rapidly as possi- 
ble on the new hotel to be put up at the corner of Geary 
and Powell streets by the Crockers. The St. Dunstan's 
bachelor apartment at the corner of "Van Ness Avenue and 
Sutter street is nearly finished. The old Baldwin Hotel 
property, so long an eyesore, will before long be the site 
of a building worthy the locality. Fine structures are go- 
ing up in the wholesale district. 

In addition to this, apartment houses, private residences 
and flats are being erected all over town, and in many cases 
they are rented before the foundation is laid. In many years 
there has not been such a scarcity of houses to let. 

Taking it altogether, San Francisco has nothing to com- 
plain of, and more to be thankful for than in a long time 
past. 



THAT BILLION AND A HALF OF EXPORTS. 

That billion and a half dollars' worth of exports during 
the fiscal year just ended, means a great deal. It means the 
markets and not the maxims, which President McKinley 
has become so anxious to cultivate. It means that Uncle 
Sam, who was once rich enough to give every man a farm, 
has become strong and skilled enough to run a world';; work- 
shop. It means cheap food for the teeming millions of Eu- 
rope and a comfortable cash balance for the people of the 
United States. It means that our manufactures are ex- 
panding at a marvelous rate, and it means, or it ought to 
mean, a fair day's wage to every man willing to do a fair 
day's work. It is the highest possible, and best realization 
of the right kind of "expansion." What are we going to do 
with it? In the first place, we are not minded to grow weary 
in well doing; on the contrary, the tide of our industrial 
success is only just setting in. The great Trusts have 
hardly yet got fairly started. When they get into good 
working shape, it is safe , from present indications, to 
predict that their productive capacity will discount all 
that has gone before. That means still vaster exports, 
z. people as industrious and busy as bees, and a na- 
tion enriched with such an accumulation of wealth as 
will place its people above and beyond the fear of 
that temporary depression which money panics and hard 
times bring to the best regulated communities. Never be- 
fore did a nation look over a more pleasing prospect than 
that which at present confronts the people of our happy 
land. 

All this is as far as human eyes can see. There is, how- 
ever, one factor that must always enter into such cal- 
culations. What has Providence in store for us? A total, 
or even partial, failure of crops would give us a setback 
that we might not overcome in a decade. Fortunately, the 
promise of a bountiful harvest is now almost assured of 
fulfillment. The reports from all sections of Uncle Sam's 
great farm are more than good. The bulletins of the Agri- 
cultural Department leave the June indications as the high- 
est in twenty years, and more than a million acres have 
been planted to wheat in excess of any previous experience. 
Crops are short all over Europe, especially in Germany, 



where the shortage is estimated at 30 per cent, as compared 
with last year. So that all the grain America has to spare 
is sure to be taken at good rates. Therefore, the country is 
safe for this year at any rate. Considering the vast area 
of our domain, the virginity of its soil, and its varied cli- 
mate, it is hardly likely that crops in this country will ever 
be subject to the vicissitudes that they are in Europe. If 
drought is experienced in one section, bountiful rains are 
likely in others. If this heated term does injury in the 
East. California, Oregon and Washington can be depended 
upon to make good the deficiency. There is no danger of 
a falling off in our exports during the next fiscal year. 



TAXING STREET FRANCHISES. 

The Supreme Court of New Jersey has just delivered an 
important decision touching the legality of taxing street 
railways. The point on which the decision turned was the 
nature ot the right to occupy streets which railway compan- 
ies possess. The argument relied upon by the Newark 
Traction Company, in opposing the tax assessed upon its 
right of way, was that such right was not real estate; and 
that if it were, it was of no value because it was not exclus- 
ive. It argued that a trolley company has no greater right 
in the street than the foot traveler, or the ordinary vehicle, 
and that its right is therefore no more subject to taxation 
than Id theirs. The Court held that "as between the City 
of Newark having title to the highways, and the trolley com- 
pany, the latter has acquired the right to lay on the soil the 
loundations for its tracks, to lay rails thereupon, and the 
right to the continuous, uninterrupted use of such part of 
the public estate. The poles and its tracks are there to the 
exclusion of any other person who might desire to occupy 
the land. To say that such a right is no greater than that 
enjoyed by the public in general is in conflict with the evi- 
dence of our senses. When the public grants to a par- 
ticular person or corporation an exclusive right to occupy 
a highway for a particular purpose, it is the grant of an 
casement which is as much real estate as that out <5f which 
it is granted." Those are clear-cut and forcible words that 
have a meaning and an interest far beyond the bounds of 
the State of New Jersey. That our own State Supreme 
Court could, however, be got to approve and adopt them 
may well be doubted. Its decisions are not usually so con- 
servative of public rights. The question of taxing all sorts 
ot street franchises is growing in interest. The New Jersey 
decision is an important step towards its settlement. 



INTEMPERATE TEMPERANCE. 

Mr. John G. Wooley, who was the Prohibition candidate for 
the Presidency of the United States at the last national elec- 
tion, favored the public, a few days ago, with a letter which 
was published in a daily paper, and in which he undertook 
to refute the allegation that the abolishment of the army 
canteen had resulted in an increase of drunkenness and 
minor crimes among the soldiers, and had led to the estab- 
lishment of a great many disreputable gin mills and dives 
in the immediate neighborhood of army posts. Mr. Wooley 
is a temperance leader, but he writes in a most intemperate 
manner. He seems to lack the capacity of logical argument. 
Such argument as he makes consists of bald assertion un- 
supported by recognized or demonstrated facts. He ful- 
minates against the army officers and their brass buttons, 
;md accuses them of a desire to prejudice the movement 
against the canteen and to set themselves above the civil 
authority which ordered the sale of beer and wine within 
the posts to cease. But there are really no known facts 
to support this assertion, except that the officers are aware 
(and have stated) that the records show that drunkenness, 
disorder and minor crimes have increased since the canteens 
were closed. Apparently Mr. Wooley is of the opinion that 
it is the duty of army officers to falsify in order to bolster 
up the peculiar theories of himself and his associates. That 
is a strange position for a God-fearing man who occasionally 
occupies the pulpit. But Brother Wooley appears to hold 
strange ideas in regard to the virtue of veracity, for he 
boldly asserts that gin mills and dives have not increased 
in the neighborhood of army posts since the canteens were 
abolished. Any one familiar with affairs at the Presidio 
knows that this assertion is absolutely untrue. 



July 6. 1901. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

Answers to Correspondents 



By Ella Wilier Wheelcox. 



By Ella Wilier Wheelcox. 
Patriotism. 

My head Is in a sling to-day, 
My arms are fractured, too, 

I have a band — 

Air" on each hand. 
So hurrah for the Red, White and Blue: 

It was a battle fierce and hot 
Where cool and lion-hearted 

In mimic war 

I battled (or 
My ancestors departed. 

Our granddads faced the cannon once 
When battle's cloud loomed blacker. 
And In the fray 

Of yesterday 
I faced the cannon cracker. 

"The glorious natal day of our liberties, dear to our 
I.earts and the hearts of our ancestors," writes Junius 
Halloran. a talented graduate of the Martinez high school, 
"is past and gone, and it fills my breast with pride once 
more on the night of Independence Day to see the smiling 
sun set upon our broad land, shedding its departing radiance 
on a free and equal people. I wish you would print our 
Independence Day programme in full. Pietro Martinelli 
spoke on 'Our Glorious Ancestors at Valley Forge,' and 
Heinrich von Katzenjammer on 'America for the Ameri- 
cans.' The speechmaking was followed by a Free-for-all 
Field Day and Grand Beer Barbecue in which two men were 
shot. Will you please insert this in your society columns?" 

Always willing to oblige. It gratifies me to fee that 
Messrs. Halloran, Martinelli and Katzenjammer have not 
forgotten the traditions of their Puritan ancestry and have 
fed our glorious national bird with the eloquence on which 
he thrives. Which reminds me that we have just undergone 
another Fourth of July and that correspondence is pouring 
in to me from every hand asking me what we had better do 
about it. 

"My little boy, Fitzgerald, had a very nice time on the 
Fourth of July. What treatment had I best give him for 
burns on the face, hands and arms, a compound fracture of 
the left forearm and slight bruises about the body?" 

Such cases as that of your little boy are best remedied 
on the Third of July, rather than the Fourth. On the night 
before the celebration it is always wise to treat the patient 
to a thorough massage with a hard-wood shingle. Do not 
use the redwood or cedar kind as they split before results 
are obtained. The patient should be locked securely in a 
cool and quiet room during the Fourth, when contact with 
the outside air is most dangerous. 

"Can you tell me of a nice quiet place where a man can go 
cheap to spend next Fourth?" 

If you are a good navigator you might hire a row-boat 
and head for midocean, avoiding picnic parties anl yacht 
races. Oakland, too, is noted for its padded pavements and 
pneumatic street-cars, but whether they use soundless fire- 
crackers in that rest-cure sanitarium, I don't know. 



It is surprising the number of people who go to the 

Grand notel Cafe for the lunch that is served there from 
11 to 2 daily, by Fay & Foster, the proprietors. They always 
have the best to be procured, served in attractive style. 



They who want the best work done send their carpets 

to Spaulding's Carpet Cleaning Works, at 353 Tehama street. 
They remove all the dirt without injuring the goods, and 
send them back looking like new. Goods called for and de- 
livered, and work done in remarkably quick time. You will 
save money by patronizing them. 

After the theatre step around to the Cafe Zinkand for 

a bite before going to rest. You will find the best people 
in town there, will hear first-class music, and will be served 
with the best viands prepared in the most approved style. 



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The University Preparatory 

SCHOOL, Ithaca, N. Y. 



Prepares for all 
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CORNELL UNIVERSITY 



Certificate has been accepted since 1895. Boarding and Day Depart- 
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Summer Term from July 16th to September 15th. Fall term opens 
Sept 26th for year 1901-'02. 
Of the school. President Schurman, says; 

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in your school. The excellent management and complete curriculum 
render it a most desirable preparatory school for the University." 

Send tor Illustrated catalogue. GH A3, fl. STILES, B. S.. Headmaster 

Avenue S, Ithaca, N. Y. 



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Importers - MACONDRAY & CO. 



8AN FRANCI8CO NEW8 LETTER. 



July 6, 1901. 




Tkc/jurelr 
. Wand 

Oft city no wand but P/eaturt'^ 
** —Tom Jiaf" ^m& 



Yes, David Belasco is the Ella Wheeler Wilcox of the 
stage. Like her he plays the auto-harp of human emotions, 
with many a "barber-shop" mlnar and many a heart-bite 
chord. But he must look to his laurels now, for the 
Servant Uirls' Sybil is about to invade his domain and pro- 
duce a play in New York. But I do riot fear for his sover- 
eignty, for while Mrs. Wilcox has the advantage of origi- 
nality, it is more than offset by Belasco's knack for pilfer- 
ing and his indisputable mastery of every device known to 
the stage. Belasco does not try to give the public good 
plays; he wishes merely to give it the plays it will like. 
An utterly unworthy, pragmatical aim from the view-point 
of many, but there are those who think that the Belasco 
play and the Ella Wheeler ethical essayette have a legiti- 
mate place in the scheme of things. 



All of this is apropos of "Under Two Flags," by Paul Pot- 
ter, in which there is abundant evidence of Belasco's fine 
Italian hand. I cannot believe that there is any one who 
does not enjoy Blanche Bates' performance of Cigarette, 
but many are commenting unfavorably on the play. Of 
course. That is to be expected. I would do so myself if 
I thought it was worth while. But what is the use of abus- 
ing anything so obviously raw as "Under Two Flags," par- 
ticularly when the altogether admirable acting of Blanche 
Bates commands our attention? Of course, the play is 
trash. Of course it is too bad that she should have to 
appear in it. But then we have her and we enjoy her, be the 
play never so inferior to her talent and ability. It is quite 
useless to storm about Belasco's degradation of the drama; 
he must be endured, like some other evils. At present 
he has "the situation well in hand," and will continue to 
give us spectacular humanism with Mrs. Carter and Blanche 
Bates burning out their souls to distract our attention from 
the wheels and pinions of the machine. It is a morbid con- 
dition that will work its own cure in time. 

* * * 
The Tivoli has in the course of years evolved a type of 
musical burlesque that is essentially its own. It is quite dif- 
ferent from the old English rhymed and punned affair, al- 
though usually affined thereto in its subject, and it is 
totally unlike the Casino or Webber & Field variety. "The 
Babes in the Wood," by Ferris Hartman, if you please, is 
i. Tivoli burlesque, and naturally the Tivoli company is at 
home in it. Hartman himself miade something of a hit in 
it three or four years ago, when his extravagant caricature of 
Weary Willie was first added to his impersonations. The 
stage tramp has been worked to death since then, although 
his counterpart in real life is as leary of labor as ever. 
Of course, there is little or no coherency in the "Babes," 
but that is a quality foreign to the Tivoli burlesque. It is 
not expected nor demanded. In fact, nothing is demanded 
but hap-hazard comedy, and the people who crowd the house 
during a spell of burlesque know just what to expect. It 
is all very frivolous, in part fairly clever, occasionally capital, 
here and there stupid, and now and then inane. On the 
whole a good average is struck, and the wants of the 
searcher after fun are served. There are specialties galore 
introduced and numerous songs. Hartman's recitation about 
a circus baby is serio-comic, and of course makes a hit. 
It is quite extraordinary how well he can turn out a turn 
of that kind. Arthur Cunningham sings "Will o' the Wisp" 
admirably, or rather his voice is admirable, for in point of 
fact he gives the song rather too stolidly. He has color in 
his voice, but does not use it boldly, and the dramatic qual- 
ity is only suggested and not impressed. One of the very best 
things in -the show is Harry Cashman's Hebraic imitation 
and the accompanying song. In point of make-up and man- 
ner the caricature is immense. 

PORTER GARNETT. 



Next week promises to be the most interesting one of 
Miss Florence Roberts' entire season. She will make her 
first appearance in the role of Lady Teazle in Sheridan's 
famous comedy, "The School for Scandal," a play which has 
not been seen here for some time. It has been a favorite 
role with all of the greatest stars since the eighteenth 
century. A great deal of interest is awakened among thea- 
tre-goers iu consequence of Miss Roberts' essayal of the role 
of Lady Teazle. Barton Hill, who has directed this play 
lor some of the most noted artists, has the presentation un- 
der his supervision. He himself will play the character 
of Sir Peter Teazle. The costumes have been made exclu- 
sively for this production. The cast includes: Mr. Barton 
Hill, Mr. White Whittlesey, Mr. George Webster, Mr. Carlyle 
Moore, Mr. Harry Rattenbury, Mr. Lucius Henderson, Mr. 
Frank Bacon, Mr. Paul Gerson, Mr. Edwin Emery, Mr. 
Walter Belasco, Mr. Jack Morris, Lillian Armsby, Marie 
Howe, and Agnes Rankin. 

• • * 
Mr. Frawley was to a degree unfortunate in choosing "The 
Only Way" for the initial week of his eight weeks' engage- 
ment in this city. The same play was too much of a suc- 
cess here with Mr. Henry Miller as Sydney Carton for us not 
to compare all subsequent productions with the original 
of Mr. Miller. To compare Mr. E. J. Morgan with Mr. Mil- 
ler is to give the former the worst of it; for Mr. Morgan has 
shown us all this week that he is temperamentally unfitted 
to impersonate Sydney Carton. San Francisco looks forward 
to Morgan parts that will show him at his best — and that 
best is excelled with difficulty, but it is certainly not aspired 
to in tne part of Sydney Carton. Mr. Theodore Roberts as 
Le Farge, Mr. Jack Mason as Evermpnde, Miss Katherine 
Giey as Mimi, and Miss Alice Johnson as Lucy Manette, 
while more or less misplaceu in the present piece, yet give 
promise of an excellent season to follow. 

* * • 

The bill presented at the Orpheum this week was a good 
one, with plenty of novelties. Mr. P. Richards does a crayon 
turn, producing startlingly real and funny cartoons while 
you wait. Ina Allen, the California girl, whose first appear- 
ance on the vaudeville stage has been heralded so loudly, 
did not disappoint anybody. Her mezzo-soprano voice is 
full of richness and beauty. La Moyne Brothers' acrobatic 
turn is clever, as is that of the Prosper troupe. Bimm, Bomm 
& Brrr are musical clowns who really do something original. 
The sketches are two,, and they are both actable and well 
acted, Marie Stuart producing "Dickey," and Emily Lytton 
and Mr. Charles Bowser "A Wise Guy." 

* * • 

The third week of the prosperous run now being enjoyed 
by Charles Frohman's production of "Under Two Flags" 
will begin next Monday night at the Columbia Theatre. 
From present appearances there will be no empty seats while 
the big spectacle is kept on the boards. Blanche Bates' mar- 
\elous interpretation of the role of Cigarette has won her 
;i distinctive triumph, and she will no doubt find it quite diffi- 
cult to secure a more interesting character for portrayal 
than the one in which she is at present entrancing the thea- 
tre-goers of this city. 

* * • 

The Orpheum promises another good bill for next week. 
Arras & Alice have a novelty act iu vaudeville. Gilbert & Gol- 
die need no introduction. Irving Jones is a monologlst is 
the author of a number of popular songs, and one of the 
best-known figures In the New York amusement world. 

* • • 

Sapho drew crowded houses at the Alcazar all the 
week. Miss Florence Roberts has made a reputation in the 
title role, and Mr. White Whittlesey makes an admirable 
Jean. The Alcazar people, noted for their careful staging 
made the production of "Sapho" a lavish one scenically.' 
* * » 
The next attraction for the Columbia is the sweet singer 
Mr. Chauncey Oleott, who will appear in his newest Irish 
comedy success, "Garrett O'Magh." Mr. Oleott will bring 
his entire production direct to this city from New York 
where it was seen during a five months' run. 

* • « 

"The Babes in the Wood" will continue to be the attraction 
at the Tivoli until further notice. 



July ». 1901. 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Fresh Air for the Children 



By Ermenttne Poole Long. 

Such a little bit of a cottage In Mill Valley, but every olght 
II holds six of the sleepiest, tiredest and happiest children 
to be found around San Francisco. 

They have been romping and shouting all day long in a 
.eally, truly garden, under live trees and on growing grass, 
and it's the first time their cramped little city-pavement 
souls and bodies have had a chance to know what "country" 
means. They are the waif children of alleys and back 
streets, over whom the Little Sisters of the Infant Shelter 
stretches a protecting arm in San Francisco. It is owing 
to the energies and determination of the members of the 
Auxiliary of the Shelter that its proteges are enjoying in 
detachments of six per week the delights of an untrammeled 
existence in the country. When the girls of the Auxiliary 
declared their daring project of giving the children some 
fresh air their enthusiasm received enough cold water to 
more than quench any amount of ardor. "The children did 
not need fresh air — San Francisco air was good enough 
for any of them." "Where were they going to get money to 
put the thing through?" "They never could do it in the 
world, and they would better give up the whole thing." 
These and other objections but added fuel to the flames, 
for with no bank account and little or no experience the girls 
went to work, and as a result of their vigorous efforts the 
< ottage in Mill Valley was rented for three months, a 
woman installed as house-keeper, and the simple furnishing 
secured. Two weeks ago a small but triumphant procession 
of "one grown-up and six kids" took the train for the happy 
valley. 

It is an unwritten and unbreakable law of the shelter that 
no begging shall ever be done, but the shelter has friends 
and a bank account. The Auxiliary had no bank-book, but — 
the members had friends, and the girls had a topic which 
opens the door of many otherwise tightly-closed hearts. 
"Hear the voices of the children, how they cry upon the 
streets." Some one, who is still anonymous, sent a check for 
the three months' rent; some on else said: "Take what you 
want for the kitchen." Another remembered that bedding 
was needed, and before the girls knew it their cottage was 
ieady, ana they still had a little of their fund left for running 
expenses. Has it been worth while? Ask the children. Do 
you long for the country, yon city man and woman, the coun- 
try you have known and loved, the freedom, the quiet air, 
the softness of mother earth, and her invitation to come 
and rest upon her breast. Think what it can all mean to the 
child whose natural birthright these should be, but whose 
inheritance is poverty and the grim surroundings of the 
tenement and the gutter. Yes, ask the children if they think 
it worth while to know even one week of country, and what 
comes with it. Will they have it again next summer? These 
girls say so; they also say they don't exactly know how, but 
they mean to have a larger house, more children, and for a 
longer time. Their cause is one of humanity's noblest, and 
because of its worth they must succeed. All honor to the 
Auxiliary, for to them must be given the credit of carrying 
cut the idea, long discussed and talked of by different 
charities in San Francisco, of providing the way for giving 
to the little ones of the slums the joy of living, if only for one 
short week, in an atmosphere undeflled by city odors and 
vileness. 



It has become a recognized fact among sportBmen that the 
Selby factory-loaded shells are the best to be obtained. They 
are accurately and scientifically loaded, and have a record 
for uniformity. The world's inanimate target record was 
made with them. Your chbice of these smokeless powders 
is given: In "bulk," Dupont, Hazard, Schultze, "B. C." In 
"dense," Shotgun, Rifleite, Laflin & Rand, Ballastlta. These 
shells are loaded by the Selby Smelting and Lead Co., S. F. 



Mrs. Terry, Mrs. Kendall, Adelina Patti and other 

notables use and endorse Camielline for the Complexion. 
It is the best protection against the wind and sun and cannot 
be excelled for keeping the skin fresh and clear. 




"There's the rub." <»,«,,.,.> 

I he "rub" in one hand, and the 
effect of it in the other. 
Good design for a soap 
"ad.— isn't it? Question 
of health, if nothing else, 
ought to make you give up 
this wearing washboard rubbing with 
soap, and take up the sensible way of washing 
with Pearline — soaking, boiling, rinsing. The 
washboard rubbing, done in the midst of soiled 
clothes and tainted steam is harmful to any 
woman. If you think it isn't, you'd better 
think again. 6;o 



Ql„-.-,^- Tk«.i.» BM.A80O A Thau,, Managers. 

rAicazar I neatre. Phone Main im 

FLORENCE ROBERTS 

In Her First Appearance as Lady Teazle, in 

THE SCHOOL FOR SCANDAL 

Supported by White Whittlesey and Aloazar Stock Company. 

Handsomely costumed- Beautifully staged. 
Only Matinee — Saturday— Only Malinee. 
Seats six days in advance. 75, 50, 35, 25, 15c. 

Columbia Theatre. °™ L ° B ' I>s"ees andManarers. 
Third week of the BIG SPECTACLE Begins Next MONDAY. 
CHARLES FKOHMaN'S Colossal Production from Garden 
Theatre. Hew York. By Arrangement with DAVID BELASCO, 

UNDER TWO FLAGS 

Paul M- Potter's live-act drama on (Hilda's novel. Entire New 
York Scenery and Company, over 100 People. Including 

BLANCHE BATES as CIGARETTE 

Every might (except Sunday). Matinee Saturday, 



Mrs. Ebnestine Keeling, 

Proprietor and Manager. 



Tivoli Opera house. 

It la a Huge Success! The Sparkling Extravaganza, 

BABES IN THE WOOD 

Written by Ferris Hartman. Loaded with the Latest Songs. 

Saturated with Funny Sayings. Cast and Mounting Superb. 

Do Not Miss the Last Comic Piece of the Season. 

Evenings at 8. Matinee Saturday at 2. 

Popular prices— 25 and 60 cents. Telephone Bush 0. 

1 San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. 

r P neU m . O'Farrell St.. between Stockton and Powell streets. 

Arras & Alice, Gilbert & Goldie, Irving Jones, Clayton White, 
Marie Stuart & Co.. Prosper Troupe, Emily Lytton, Chas. 
Bowser & Co.; Bimm, Bomm, Brrr; La Moyne Brothers, Blo- 
gTaph. 

Reserved Seats 25o.; balcony 10c. ; opera ohalrs and box seats, 50c. 

Matinees Wednesday. Saturday, and Sunday. 



After the Theatre 



Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the finest 
wines, beers and supper. ...■_«., 

The Cafe Zlnkand Is society's gathering plaoe alter the theatre 
oyer. 



"I've prescribed 
enough . . . 



Bethesda 



to swim in. 



— Dr. Shbady, 274 Lexington avenue. Now York 
L. CAHEN &JSON, Agents, Wholesale Liqu»r Dealers, 
Send for Pamphle *' 8 Sacramento Street. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 6, 1901. 




Library&able 



^-- ' ■■ 




The recently very successful pre- 

The Curious Courtship sentation of "D'Arcy ■ of the 

of Kate Poins. Guards" has made the- name of 

Mr. Louis Evan Shipman famll-' 
iar to theatre-goers. Mr. Shipman has now turned his at- 
tention to story telling, and has written- a readable romance 
of the rakish times of the Prince Regent, who was after- 
wards George IV. In "The Curious Courtship of Kate 
Poins" the author sets out with some skill and significance 
the manners, customs, and conversations of a society that, 
under the stimulus that the gay and profligate Regency fur- 
nished, in the early and middle part of the nineteenth cen- 
tury, many episodes — some scandalous, some romantic — 
which offer to modern romancers a prolific field of Actional 
possibilities. The heroine's father was a certain Jack Poins, 
a captain in the Horse Guards, a loose liver and roystering 
rake, who; although a member of the famous "Blues," was 
as some wit of the town proclaimed, in reality a blackguard, 
as notorious for his skill as a duelist as he was for his want 
of honor. In an encounter with Sir Kenstone Nevill, of a 
member of whose family he had spoken lightly, both he and 
his opponent fall mortally wounded at the first . fire. The 
outcome of the double tragedy is the motif of the story. 
Captain, later Sir Richard Nevill, by a whimsey of fate, falls 
in love with the daughter of his father's. slayer. The scoun- 
drelly Vicomte de Broisic, the degenerate son of an old 
B'rench emigri, whose extravagances had outrun his in- 
come and finally swallowed up his patrimony, turns his 
thoughts towards marriage as the solution of all his -pressing 
difficulties. He decides upon the courtship of Kate Poins. 
as he had reason to believe that she will be richly endowed 
by her uncle, but her youth and extraordinary beauty add 
zest to his matrimonial aspirations. Despite the machina- 
tions of the unscrupulous and plausible HonorP de Broisic, 
Dick Nevill, who, on the death of his cousin, succeeds to the 
title and august position of the Marquess of Kenstone. out- 
wits the wily Frenchman, and in the end wins the prize he 
covets — the heart and hand of the lovely Kate. There is a 
charming description of a quaint garden belonging to an 
old manor-house on the outskirts of Bath. With its hedged 
parterres and pleached alleys, its closely woven arborets 
through the interstices of which the distant, bending Avon 
can be seen, it makes a pleasing mental picture. Then 
"Almack's" and "White's" and "Brooks'," and the other 
clubs where men of fashion were wont to gather and talk of 
the mews and the prize ring, are lightly sketched in, and 
form a realistic background to the main characters who 
plot, and fight, and love in the somewhat impetuous way of 
a byegone era. 
E>. Appleton & Co., Publishers, New York. Price, $1.50. 

iFrancis.W. van Praag, a new author, 
Clayton Hallowell. has written, in "Clayton Hallowell," 
a story of Revolutionary times. The 
scene is laid in Morristown, N. J., and the country round 
f.bout, during the British occupancy of New York in 1777. 
The hero is a Continental officer who is caught in the tolls 
of a woman who is a spy in the service of the British com- 
mander in Philadelphia, but who has strength of character 
enough to tear himself away when he discovers the truth. 
The illustrations are by Winthrop Earle, and the frontis- 
piece shows Washington's headquarters at Morristown. 
R. F. Fenno & Co., Publishers, New York. Price, $1.50. 

A useful 'little volume, "A Handbook 
A Handbook of of Proverbs," has recently been com- 
Proverbs. piled for "readers, thinkers, writers 

and speakers." The classified arrange- 
ment enables one to find easily an apt quotation on the vari- 
ous subjects contained in the list of contents. A list of the au- 
thorities quoted — two hundred and fifty-six — is also included, 
and covers a wide range from the Scripture and Hebrew pro- 
verbs to La Rochefoucauld and Schopenhauer. 

New Amsterdam Book Co., New York. Price, 75 cents. 



Edmund Burke once said, "Man Is by 
The Evolution of constitution a religious animal." An 
Immortality. endless human interest attaches to 

the question, "If a man die shall he 
live again?" "The Evolution of Immortality," by S. D. Mc- 
Connell, D. D., D. C. L., is a conscientious and scholarly 
effort to read the eternal riddle, an attempt "to build a faith 
out of the material which human consciousness, human 
science, and Holy Scripture can furnish." The belief cur- 
rent within Christendom upon the question of the future 
life remained substantially unchanged during the thirteen 
centuries between Augustine and Darwin. How that belief 
came into Christianity, and how it is rapidly, if silently, dis- 
appearing from among thoughtful men. and what are 
the chief influences against which it cannot persist, 
are the points to which the writer gives careful con- 
sideration. He maintains that an enduring life for the in- 
dividual, if attained at all, must be reached through his 
highest quality, and he strenuously urges upon his readers 
the necessity of the belief that holiness is the very path 
to abiding life. "We need have no fear," writes Dr. McCon- 
nell, "that belief in 'the resurrection of the dead, and the 
lief in the world to' come, will be abandoned, provided only 
it be conceived of in such a way as will permit it to be 
correlated with all else which we know to be true." 

The Macmillan Company, Publishers, New York. Price, 
$1.25. 

The Reconstruction period in the 
Henry Bourland: South is the time chosen by Albert 
The Passing of Elmer Hancock for the setting of 
the Cavalier. his story, "Henry Bourland: The 

Passing of the Cavalier." Himself a 
Northerner, the writer has endeavored to take for the time 
being the point of view of the Southern planter, to write 
sympathetically the annals of a Virginia family, and to show 
how. amid the conditions following the war, it was impossi- 
ble for the wealthy planters to recover their status upon 
the old basis. In his foreword the author explains that 
the story is, in its broader aspects, a symbol of the extinc- 
tion of the Southern aristocracy and their ideals and tradi- 
tions as social forces. Among the incidents and descriptions 
are 'the firing on Fort Sumter, the battle of Gettysburg, 
Lee at Appomattox, a carpetbag legislature in session, the 
operations of the Ku Klux, the suppression of negro domina- 
tion, the return of the Bourbons, the political factors of the 
new South, the eviction of the cavalier. There is much of 
sorrow and tragedy and the horror of war in Mr. Hancock's 
novel, but there is also some grim humor, and not a little 
true love to brighten the shadow of its pages. 
The Macmillan Co., Publishers. Price, $1.50. 

Those who are curious to 
The Writings of King Alfred, know something of the real 

father of Saxon prose must 
not fail to read an address recently delivered at Harvard 
College by Frederic Harrison, M. A., Honorary Fellow of 
Wadham College, Oxford. It is entitled "The Writings of 
King Alfred," and is an able discourse on the great West 
Saxon King who is not only the founder of many English 
institutions and ways but of a regular prose literature as 
well. "He was," Mr. Harrison says "one of those rare 
rulers of men who trust to the book as much as to the 
sword, who value the school more than the court, who be- 
lieve in no force save the force of thought and truth." Mr. 
Harrison's lecture took on a new significance from the fact 
that this year is the millenary or thousandth anniversary 
of the death in 901, of King Alfred. In commemoration of 
this event a grand colossal statue is now being raised at 
Winchester, where Alfred, the writer of books, lived and 
died. Mr. Harrison's address is intellectually stimulating 
an., should be read by all interested in knowing something 
of the beauty and dignity of Alfred's own thoughts. 

The Itacmillan Co.. Publishers, New York. Price 25cts. 

MARY E. BUCKNALL. 



BOOKS REVIEWED IN THIS PAPER 
Can be Obtained at 



Robertson's 



126 Post Street 



July 6. 1901. 

THE WAY 



THEY CELEBRATE 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



By Robert McTaviah. 

A Hero in Durance Vile. 

A mil. straight negro soldier, with a mustache and Imper- 
ial, and with an air of being Immensely proud of his uniform, 
waa arrested for boisterous conduct the other evening, said 
conduct being the result of a conflict with the demon rum, 
In which the demon came off victorious. The soldier hadn't 
the least idea in the world that he was whipped, though, and 
was very voluble. 

"Offlcah," he said, "there ain't a jedge in thisher town 
will send me up. Why. I was at de battle of San Juan." 

"Faith, it's little any of the judges '11 care about that." said 
the officer, reassuringly. "You're dhrunk, and yer loikely to 
get ten days." 

"I won dat battle," said the soldier, impressively, turning 
to the crowd. "Teddy Roosevelt an' i marched right up dat 
hill togedder. an' Teddy sez, 'Now, Sam, we won't shoot till 
we sees de whites of deir teef.' An' Teddy's own teef was 
jis' flashin'. I doan want to brag ab6ut dat battle, but after 
it was all over, an' we berried de t'irty t'ousan' Spaniards 
dat we killed, Gin'l Miles he called me over to his tent an' 
said " 

"General Miles wasn't there." said some one in the crowd. 

"Wasn't he? Maybe yo' was dere. Gen'l Miles he sez to 
me, sez 'e, 'Sam, if yo' evah git arrested in San Francisco 
by some fool offlcah fo' gittin' drunk aftah yo git back 
f om de Philippines, yo' jis' send fo' me' ' 

"Faith, if ye on./ had the papers lor ahl that it's a pin- 
shun ye'd be gettin' instead of tin days," said the officer as 
he bundled him into the wagon. • 

* * * 
Regardless of Expense. 

Two colored soldiers cake-walked up Kearny street Mon- 
day afternoon in the full enjoyment of release from service. ' 
One was small and yellow, the other large and very black, 
and both somewhat the worse for gin. But they were very 
happy. The big fellow had discarded his khaki uniform, 
but still retained his pith helmet, and the other had nothing 
left to remind him of his past career except a slouch hat. 

The strains of music from a phonograph parlor attracted 
their notice and proved the strongest temptation that had 
been thrown in their way. 

"Let's hear 'Tigah Lily,' " said the big fellow when they 
were inside. 

A hungry look came into the eyes of the little fellow, who 
had evidently spent all his money and was depending on his 
companion for entertainment. "Let's have 'Whistlin' Rufus,' " 
he said wistfully. 

"Suah," said the big fellow. "We'll hab 'em both." 

And they did. More than that, they heard "Mah Angeline," 
"All Coons Look Alike to Me," "Honolulu Lady," "Ise Got a 
White Man Workin' for Me," and a dozen others. There 
seemed to be no end to their capacity for enjoyment, and 
when all the coon songs on the list had been exhausted they 
turned reluctantly away. Then the big one's face brightened. 
"Le's heah 'Whistlin' Rufus' again." 

"Say," said the little fellow affectionately, "what I likes 
about you is de way youah money holds out." 

* * * 

A Disappointed Granger. 

Thursday morning I met my friend Si Ayseed on Market 
street, and he hailed me gladly, delighted to see a familiar 
face in this wilderness. 

f'Jest came down to see ther celebration," he said. "Who's 
to be George an' Martha Washin'ton?" 

"George and Martha Washington?" I said inquiringly, 
then I remembered how the glorious Fourth is celebrated 
in Si's home town. "I don't think there's to be any, Si." 
"Ain't there goin' to be no procession?" 
"Well, I believe there's to be a parade of some sort." 
"But ain't there goin' to be no George an' Martha Wash- 
in'ton in a carridge, an' a Goddess of Liberty in a wagon 
with a lot of girls representin' the States?" 




When buying 



Knox's 
Gelatine 



speak the name KNOX plainly. 
This is important because unfair com- 
petitors take similar names to trade 
on my reputation . Remember, please, 
that KNOX is spelled 

K=N=0=X 

and that my gelatine is perfection. 
Its transparency proves its purity. It 
is granulated — measure with a spoon 
like sugar. 

I WILL MAIL FREE 

my book of seventy " Dainty Desserts 
for Dainty People," if you will send the 
name of yo'ur grocer. If you can't do 
this, send a two-cent stamp. 

For 5C. in stamps, the book and full 
pint sample. 

For 15c, the book and full two-quart 
package (two for 25c). 

Each large package contains pink color 
for fancy desserts. 

A large package of Knox's Gelatine 
will make two quarts (a half gallon) 
of jelly.. 

CHAS. B. KNOX, 

91 Knox Avenue, Johnstown, N. Y. 



"I'm afraid not, Si. I haven't heard of it." 
"No snollingosters, neither, nor a picnic an' barbecue out 
in the woods with some one to read the Declaration of In- 
dependence an' a fellow to orate?" 

I told my good friend that all these things were lacking, 
and his disgust was huge. "I've stayed in town a day 
longer'n I intended," he said, "which cost me nearly a 
dollar, expectin' to see something great, an' now by the time 
I get home there won't be nothin' left of the celebration 
there but the empty powder can where they was firin' off 
the anvil." 



Techau Tavern is the place to go after the theatre. 

Good music, good cooking and polite and attentive service 
make it the most attractive place in town to visit. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 6, 1901. 



MERE GOSSIP 



Betsy Bird. 

I have it upon the best authority that Mrs. Henry Oxnard 
is about to present her lord with an heir. This will bring 
pain to Mrs. Robert Oxnard, nee Stetson, tor she has been so 
anxious to have offspring herself. It will also delight the 
Oxnards, tor this will be the first grandchild in the family. 
The baby to come is expected to make a complete reconcilia- 
tion between the Henry Oxnards and the other members of 
the family, who were a trifle shocked that Henry took to 
wife Mile. Marie Pichon, who had been a lady's maid. As 
a whole, the Oxnard family married late in life, and there 
are two maiden aunts, very charming, kindly and gracious, 
awaiting the heir apparent to the great Oxnard fortunes. 

I have always known, although the public and newspapers 
generally have not realized it. that Mr. Henry Oxnard did 
not make a mesalliance. He and his bride are now with 
the parents of the bride near Alma, in the Santa Cruz Moun- 
tains. Marie Pichon came of a very excellent French family, 
had enjoyed nearly every advantage that the society girl 
of to-day has, and yet by a series of circumstances was 
v, lady's maid. Her parents lived in one of the provinces of 
Fiance. Her uncle was a priest, in Paris. So Madame Pi- 
chon placed her two children, Marie and Frank, in school 
in that city, and the parents started for California, the 
land of flowers, sunshine, and gold, to prepare a beautiful 
home for their old age in this State. They were wealthy in 
fra'.ics. and they hoped to become so in dollars. They settled 
near Alma. 

Meanwhile, Marie was at an extremely fashionable convent 
in Paris, and her companions and friends were from among 
the noble French families. The brother, likewise, was re- 
ceiving tne best instruction in a renowned French institution. 
Even school days have an end; the Pichon children left their 
beloved France for Alma. It was a great change from the 
center of the world to a desolate, dreary winter miles from 
acquaintances in the Santa Cruz Mountains. The boy and 
girl acknowledged that the ranch was beautiful, and the 
house very handsome and commodious, but at eighteen, af- 
ter leaving Paris, a person feels the need of people. One 
winter was sufficient. The fine old French parents were 
grieved that their children were not content with their home. 
Marie started for San Francisco and Frank went to Alaska 
long before the Klondike was known. 

Marie knew music, literature, art, and could do those 
thousand and one little things in the way of embroidery 
and lace-making which only the French convent girl can 
accomplish. I believe Mrs. Oxnard paid her forty dollars 
a month, which to the young girl, estimating that sum in 
francs, was a great deal — a fortune. She was young, a 
rare beauty, a pet of the family, and very happy. Unlike 
the average American girl she was not ambitious to marry. 

When she had been with Mrs. Oxnard two years, Henry 
asked her to be his wife. She refused him. Think of that, 
maidens of society. How many are there who would have 
refused a fine-looking, charming millionaire of undoubted 
good birth and a gentleman withal. Marie Pichon thought 
of the difference in their worldly position, appreciated the 
commotion their marriage would create, and refused Mr. Ox- 
nard. 

Soon afterwards she left Mrs. Oxnard, and was with sev- 
eral ladies. I think she was last in the employ of Mrs. James 
Flood, who loved Marie. A change in her life occurred when 
her brother Frank arrived from the Klondike. He 
was a comparatively rich man. When he left he was 
engaged to a charming young girl, but for five years 
he had been given up as dead, and meanwhile she married. 
Young Pichon was a faithful lover, and he went to see the 
young wife who was to have been his. She swooned into his 
arms, and left her husband instantly. Then came a divorce 
and the husband, many say, was paid to yield his wife to her 
first love. So they married. 

Frank Pichon could not be happy so long as his sister was 
Mrs. Flood's femme <lc ehamire. He offered to give her a 
home if she would leave Mrs. Flood, but Marie refused. 
Finally he gave her fifteen thousand dollars in cash, enough 
to live on quite comfortably in France, and Marie went to 
Paris to reside in the family of her uncle, the priest. She 



gave her parents beautiful presents, was devoted to them, 
but firmly refused to abide in Alma. At last she was en- 
tirely independent. 

Meanwhile Mr. Oxnard offered himself to Marie Pichon 
several times a year, and she refused. She loved him too 
much to ask him to face the Vruit. It was in Paris, after 
four years of courtship, that she yielded to his prayers and 
became his wife. Immediately they made a tour of Europe, 
including Russia, and then they journeyed through Central 
America and Mexico. She looks like a beautiful flower, and 
in her exquisite Worth gowns is more raviasante than ever. 
Mr. Oxnard is as devoted a husband as he was a lover, and 
she is the happiest woman in the world. True stories are 
sometimes beautiful, are they not? 
• * * 

Mrs. Mcintosh, nee Goad, is in one of the hospitals taking 
the rest cure. She is not at all strong, and is really quite 
ill. Mrs. Andrew Martin has taken the rest cure twice — 
once after the Williams' affair and again after her husband's 
ueath. Mrs. Aileen Mcintosh has altered so much recently 
that her most intimate friends scarcely recognize her. ■ She 
was such a beauty, and many preferred her style to that of 
her sister. Miss Genevieve. Now, she really wears specta- 
cles and a little bonnet, which makes her look like a dear 
saint, but years older that she is. 

With the death of Mrs. Gwin, pretty Mrs. James Follis 
is thrown back into mourning. Mrs. Gwin was famous in her 
time, but to the younger generation she is known chiefly for 
being the grandmother of the handsome Mary Belle Gwin 
Follis. There are many stories extant about how Dr. Gwin 
fell in love with his wife. One that you hear a great deal is 
that he passed her father's inn, and saw her with her sleeves 
rolled up to her elbows doing a washing. He admired her 
shapely arms, and soon afterwards married her. If Mrs. 
Gwin's lower arm was anything like Mrs. Follis' I can quite 
understand it, for I think from the elbow to the wrist her 
arms are of wondrous beauty. One of her sons, Mr. William 
Gwin, married Miss Maynard, the daughter of Mr. George 
Maynard. There were three Maynard brothers in San Fran- 
cisco — John, George, and La Fayette. They were not of the 
Southern aristocracy, but of a good, substantial middle class. 
Their mother was a Richmond school teacher and ambitious 
that her sons should get on in the world. The Civil War, 
a misfortune for so many of the F. T. V.'s, was a boon to the 
Maynards. I think it was John who was a quartermaster 
in the Southern army, and the war left him rich. He married 
? girl of really blue blood, and Southerners tell me he was 
the only Maynard who did so. She has gone back to Vir- 
ginia, I hear, after passing a lifetime at Menlo. My Southern 
friends say that Mrs. John Maynard always lived in a condi- 
tion of mute apology to her aristocratic Virginia friends for 
having descended from, her great estate and married one 
of the rising middle class. I have often thought, upon meet- 
ing Mrs. Follis, that it is better .to look like a patrician than 
to be one, and surely if any woman in San Francisco re- 
sembles a descendant of the Howards and Seymours she 
does. 

* * * 

The Henry Sloanes of New York came and departed with- 
out any one making a fuss about them. Mr. Sloane and his 
daughters stayed at the Richelieu. The young ladies are 
to make their bows to society within the year. Their mother 
is Mrs. Perry Belmont, but they will have a very strong posi- 
tion in New York, because of their Vanderbilt connections. 
The Sloanes occupied ten rooms at the Richelieu, and they 
had them furnished during their stay here with things from 
their store. It is an occurrence like this which reminds us 
that the Sloanes, who are so powerful socially, are shop- 
keepers. 



Don't throw your clothes away on account of a few 

ttains or spots. You will find it more satisfactory to send 
them to Spaulding's Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment at 
127 Stockton street. They renovate clothes thoroughly and 
quickly, making them look like new. Goods are called for 
and delivered, and satisfaction always guaranteed. 



"WnEN the bar-keeper sets out Jesse Moore "A A," he etveB the customer 
the best in the houBe. 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Wlnslow's Soothing 

Syrup" for your children while teething. 



July a. 1901. 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



>cwn Crier 

'Mrsr tit Cntrf 'ifatt ttn dtwit art /■*•« ' 
'Oat V*»t mil fit*/ tht dm/. Jir. mti/cu ' 



Nigh unto dying, old and wan and grey. 
In handsome quarters Mrs. Hot k in lay; 
The donors' draughts and physic no avail. 
She soon must leave her home, the County Jail. 
And still her face was rather sweet than sad, 
ror none denied that many trials she'd had. 
«nd there, in spite of court and legal friend, 
The time had come at last when trials must end. 

Slow comes her breath, then drops her hoary head, 
Her breath grows faint and fainter — is she dead? 
No — see, she rallies, opes her age-dimmed eyes, 
Calls an attorney to her side and sighs: 
"Excuse me — to the court — for death is nearing — 
And I — must — miss — my — ninety-seventh — hearing! " 

Last week I had occasion to expose, in a general way, the 
Cafe Royal's new and brisk rival, the Baldwin Annex, 
which is corrupting a good section of Market street with 
one of the toughest criminal and gambling elements the 
city has ever seen. Michael Shaw, a nondescript who gives 
his occupation as "booster" at the Baldwin, resort has come 
under the notice of the police — under whose notice his 
headquarters should have come these many moons agone. 
His wife appealed to Judge Mogan last week for the piteous 
privilege of staying in the County Jail for six months — 
anything to get away from the creature who is living off the 
spoils of her soul. Shaw surely is a duller man than the 
majority of cappers and heelers who shear the sheep 
that enter the Baldwin Annex, else he would not need to 
trouble his wife for money. Judge Mogan made a small 
move in a good cause by committing Shaw to jail on a six 
months' sentence for vagrancy; but arrests must needs be 
frequent ana sentences long ere the Baldwin ceases to be 
annexed to the city, an open and infectious sore. 

Since Mr. and Mrs. John Bradbury have returned to their 
home in Los Angeles, it has immediately become the ques- 
tion: Shall we receive them in society? This question seems 
almost an unnecessary one when you consider the extent 
of Mr. Bradbury's bank deposits, which means that if Los 
Angeles does not receive Mr. and Mrs. Bradbury, Mr. and 
Mrs. Bradbury will create a society of their own in Los 
Angeles. True, Mrs. Bradbury has behaved, at a time still 
within our memory, like a bad woman and fool, but have not 
ladies of quality since the days of Cleopatra or Pompadour 
done likewise and still continued to rule in pomp and worldly 
pride? Morality is not entirely "a matter of geography;" 
it is a matter of social altitude, also. 

Mayor Phelan was right. Why should the city be forced 
to accept printing and bookbinding and street-cleaning and 
chimney-sweeping with a union label only? Great a trust as 
Labor is attempting to make of itself it is nevertheless a 
fact that the city has no more cause to give it exclusive 
rights on production than to grant a similar privilege to 
any self-seeking monopoly. The Mayor, one poor, crushed 
millionaire, has raised a feeble axe against the arm of the 
Octopus. Those of us who do not believe in trust tyranny 
had better help the Mayor see to it that the union label is 
taken off our city and its burden off our citizens. 

Mr. John Belshaw has just made himself notorious by 
standing on his head on Glacier Point while his brother, Mr. 
W. W. Belshaw snapshot him' with his camera. I for my 
part am considerably more interested in Glacier Point as a 
natural attraction that I am in Mr. Belshaw as an acrobat, 
and I am just savage enough to wish that one of the pur- 
poseless idiots who automobile. and circus perform on all the 
spectacular heights of California and the Yosemite would 
accidently slip off one of these days. The loss would be 
great, but the benefit to the public peace of mind would be 
inestimable. 



Will someone loan the Crier n m< II' would 

like to make himself understood concernlni his opinion on 
ill juries in. in. linn coronor*s Juries, perjuries sod the plain, 
ordinary tat-wttted twelve thai serves In any civil or crim- 
inal Iriiil whirr asslnlnlty Is needful tu return a wrong 
verdict. Can anyone find a reason for the verdict of man- 
slaughter brought agalnal \v. a. Brandos, long sin.' placed 

00 trial for the brutal murder of his little girl? Don't try 
to find reason for it. There isn't any; for the verdict KM 

returned by a Jury. The thoughtful outsider would say thai 

lithcr Brandea did not murder bis daughter, therefore was 

rving of release: or he did kill her atrociously, there 

lore should be hanged high and well. Not so the twelve 
men and dull who sat on his case. They confessed that they 
were not sure whether Brandes was quite innocent or 
very guilty, therefore concluded to split the difference and 
send him to jail anyway. King Alfred is accused of Inventing 
trial by jury. God rest his ashes! 

Professor Barrett Wendell of Harvard is teaching English 
in the University of California summer school. Professor 
Barrett's English may be that of a Macaulay or a De 
Quincey, but I say unto you, he cannot make good as a sum- 
mer school professor. He has bunched together the pretty 
schoolma'am students and has classified their essays as 
"slops" and their English a "diseased." The chances are 
even that Professor Wendell was telling the truth, but 
what a way to talk! Does not the Herr Professor know that 
politeness is the first requirement of the summer school 
teacher, whose capacity must be at once that of instructor 
and social lion? How can the sweet but ungrammatical 
girl graduate from Petaluma wax sentimental over a peda- 
gogue who says "slops"? Tut, tut, Professor! Your lan- 
guage is more academic than polite. 

It was on the 5th of July. An Exploded Fire-Cracker was 
sitting on the edge of a curbstone, when a Waning Politician 
came along. The Politician saw the Firecracker only long 
enough to kick him into the Gutter, whereat the Exploded 
One remonstrated. "See how you parade, the boss of all you 
control," he said. "Some day, however, you too may be an 
Exploded One, due to an over-sudden Boom." 

"That may be true," replied the Politician, "but while I 
last I intend to be a Scorcher, whereas you only Banged and 
became a Dead Stub." "Be not so sure," replied the Late 
Exploded. "Since going off I have- burned down a ?100,000 
Business Block, two Laundries, and a Barber Shop." Moral: 
A Red Hot Stub, when rightly applied, may cause a bigger 
blaze than a Blast Furnace. 

There is altogether too much sympathy wasted on soldiers 
and others who are robbed in dives. They seek the lowest 
dens they can find, carrying large sums of money with them, 
and fall easy victims to the harpies who are waiting for 
their kind. It is all very lamentable, of course, but experi- 
ence seems to teach them nothing. Money is of no use to 
a man who will deliberately seek such company, and, from 
an economic standpoint, it does not matter whether he 
keeps it or someone takes it away from him. The main 
objection to the dives is that police are needed to keep them 
in order, and that the money for that purpose comes from 
the pockets of decent taxpayers. 

Shall there be two Superintendents for the City and 
County Hospital? Heaven forbid! Two women Presidents 
for the W. C. T. U. would be the peace that passeth under- 
standing compared with two medical men sitting on one 
job. A good example of what might happen in that exigency 
is shown by the war waged between Dr. D'Ancona and Dr. 
Buckley over the same question. The Town Crier opines 
that our free-for-all hospital would need at least fifty 
Superintendents before it becomes a safe retreat for the 
needy sick. 

The limit has been reached by Charles Morgenworth, of 
Alameda. His wife, after many threats to do so, drowned 
herself a few days ago. Morgenworth and his sons searched 
in the tidal canal for the body and found it. The afflicted 
widower brought in a claim against the county for five 
dollars, the regular fee for finding the bodies of drowned 
people. The money was paid him, and his only regret is 
that it didn't cover funeral expenses. There* is no doubt, 
though, that he buried her as economically as possible. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 6, 1901. 



■ . . 



j_.i " -■ : ^_ 






LfOokerOn 



■h 




The Frawleys play "The Only Way"— 

Oh, tell me what's the reason? 
And is there, pray, no other way 

To open up the season? 

The Miller play, "The Only Way," 

(I say who should not say it) 
Served to display The Other Way 

From which the Frawleys play it. 
* * * 

"I am, constrained to smile," said a Los Angeles matron 
to me the other day, "when I read what a morning paper 
says about it being a social problem in Los Angeles whether 
the John Bradburys shall be received back into society. 
Why, society at large never did receive the Bradburys. 
When Mrs. Bradbury was Miss Lucy Banning, her parents, 
who belong to one of the gayest sets in Los Angeles soci- 
ety, would not hear of their daughter's alliance with Mr. 
John Bradbury. They declared openly that they did not 
approve of either the man or the morals of the man. The 
result was a romantic elopement by the dark o' the moon. 
Lucy Banning was eighteen at that timje. 

"It wasn't only Mrs. Bradbury's well advertised entangle- 
ment with Bggerton Warde and its police court sequel that 
put the Bradburys in bad odor. Tales were always rife 
about them. They were dreadfully careless, you know, 
about their behavior. When they were out for a country drive 
together they used to drink at roadside bars and worse than 
that — they used to invite their coachman in to drink with 
them. Their coachman! Imagine! 

"No, the reception of the Bradbury's is no new social prob- 
lem at Los Angeles; for what with the small numbers of the 
people wealthy enough to interest the Bradburys, and the 
largeness of the numbers whose standards and morals 
differed from theirs, there was never more than a very 
limited set with whom the Bradburys exchanged calls. Still, 
society honors Mr. Bradbury for forgiving his wife her 
one picadillo in the face of his hundred and one." 
» * * 

Scene, Oakland. Occasion, examination of applicants for 
certificates to attempt to teach in Oakland. 

Member of Board of Examiners (to Young Lady Appli- 
cant) — Now, to begin with, you have noticed in store win- 
dows fur capes, tippets, mittens and such articles. 

Y. L. A— Yes, sir. 

M. B. E. — Does your mother wear furs? 

Y. L. A.— Yes, sir. 

M. B. E. — So. And where does she procure them? 

Y. L. A. — She buys them at the stores, sir. 

M. B. E. — Good. And does your father wear mittens? 

Y. L. A.— Yes, sir. 

M. B. E. — Ah! And where does he procure the mittens? 

Y. L. A. — Please, sir, my grandmother knits them for him. 

M - P- E.— Very good, indeed. I just wanted to see what 
you know about the climate of Alameda county. 

Really and truly, Oakland is a funny, funny place. 
* * * 

Every one declares himself tired of the Scott-Martin wed- 
ding chatter, and yet all continue to talk it. People grabbed 
the newspapers eagerly, and after having read every line 
of the news threw them down in disgust, saying, "What dis- 
play!" "Yes," answered the editors, "but it was display 
about which you wanted to hear." Ten days have passed, and 
the hearts that were broken by not receiving invitations to 
that wedding would fill a column of this department. 
There are those who say frankly, "I was Mrs. Scott's friend 
for twenty years, and I was not invited." Again, one hears, 
"Mary Scott dined and lunched with me several times last 
season. I was not asked." The poor aristocrat declares, 
"Nothing but parvenues. You couldn't have dragged me 
there." The prSuder spirits declare, "I was asked, but I 
did not go." Now, you may put yourself in any class you 



wish, and wail as you please, for I have given you the various 
rormulae that society is employing. Undoubtedly at the bot- 
tom of all this gnashing of teeth there is a lot of jealousy of 
Mrs. Henry Scott. You know we can bear the decline of our 
iriends with equanimity, but oh, the fortitude we need to 
see them rise. 

Before we leave the Scott-Martin nuptials, let this coinci- 
dence be recorded: The two estates which are being united, 
the Scott and Donahue fortunes, sprang from the same 
blacksmith shop. The Donahue estate came from the 
Donahue blacksmith shop, and it was in this same one that 
Messrs. Irving and Henry Scott learned their trades. Irving 
was the foreman and Henry learned to be a draughtsman 
under him. Moreover, they are not ashamed of it. Have 
you ever noticed that self-made men are always proud of 
their advancement, while their womenkind, in nine cases 
out of ten, will wish to forget it? 

When Mr. Peter Donahue died, he cut off his widow with 
only twenty thousand a year, to be paid her during her life, 
and he left the remainder of his property, valued at five and 
a half millions, to his son, Mr. Mervyn Donahue, and the Bar- 
oness Von Schroeder. It is not generally known that Mr. 
Mervyn Donahue suggested to his sister that they give 
their stepmother her third, which was eighteen hundred 
thousand dollars. The Baroness, who is one of the kindest 
women living, consented, but when Mrs. Donahue died, not 
a penny was for the kin of her late husband, but all for her 
own. 

* * * 

Professor Lawson. of the University of California, is not 
only an eminent geologist but a man of ready wit. The 
students often attempt to play pranks on him, but usually 
with little success. 

Not long ago one of them! slipped into the tray of minerals 
which the professor intended to use in his lecture a piece 
of ordinary red brick. The word was passed around, and 
great fun was anticipated over his attempt to classify the 
substance. 

He did not notice it when he commenced his lecture. 
This," he said, picking out a small stone, "is a piece of 
granite," and he proceeded with a learned talk on its 
characteristics. 

"This is a piece of agate," he informed them on picking 
up the next fragment. He got hold of the brick next, 
looked at it for a few seconds, and said calmly: "This is a 
piece of impudence." 

* * * 

"Uneasy lies the head that wears the crown." 
Farmer (who has seen pictures of crowns) — Wall, I should 
say it would: I don't see how they sleep in 'em at all. 

It was an illustrated joke in a funny paper, and Lieuten- 
ant-Governor Jacob Neff was reading it once as he rode 
('own town. Now, nobody has ever accused the Lieutenant- 
Governor of being a horny-handed soil tiller, yet there is no 
gainsaying that his benign whiskers do exude a more 
than farmer fatherliness. When the "old war horse" had 
read the joke he glanced around and saw a real picture- 
1 ook farmer looking at it over his shoulders. His eyes 
twinkled and the Neff whiskers began to exude. He could 
l.ot resist nudging the old man and pointing to the joke. The 
farmer read it, grinned back at the Lieutenant-Governor, and 
replied: 
"Us poor farmers gets it on all sides, don't we?" 
The Lieutenant-Governor left the car and bought a mirror 
which he now wears in his hat. When he removes his 
hat, watch him look into it. It's worth while. 
* * • 

The crop of Dunham skulls now in the possession of Chief 
of Police Kidward of San Jose and Sheriff Langford, threat- 
ens to materially increase through the efforts of exploration 
parties who are at present scouring the hills that form a 
semicircle all around Santa Clara and adjoining counties. 
The exploiting or exploration parties, known as the Pan- 
American Skull Hunters, grew out of the report of a wild- 
i yed individual who declared last week that he had discov- 
ered the remains of the now extinct Dunham In the wild and 
I angled fastnesses of the mountain passes. While pot-hunt- 
ing he had opened fire on a cotton-tail that ran out of bounds, 
and in his death struggle was closely interwoven in all that 
was left of the unfortunate and criminal Dunham. He knew 
it was Dunham because — well, because Dunham was seen 



July 6. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



IS 



KOlnit Id the direction In which the last And was mr>. 

nitly. h<- reported <he matter In due form. A heavlly- 
anned body of young (allows ripe for a new sensation fol- 
lowed the clew. It Is perhaps needless to say I 
waa not found. but several skulls wars unearthed liter > l * 1 1- 
i from out of the way graveyards, so thai U 
and sheriffs force could no longer be slighted In the 

skull distribution. 

• • • 

It looked at first as though the Rodklnson incident would 
•sough to satisfy Arthur Lotto for the time being, bill 
II seems that Lotto's host of admirers have underrated his 
capacity. Last week he was Riven to understand that a 
reporter of an evening paper had said something de- 
togatory to the well-known Lotto dignity, so he hied him 
to the City Hall with blood in his eye and a ninety -five cent 
tevolver in his pocket. In the reporters' room he found his 
intended victim. 

"Are you the man who described me as a person?" he 
begun. 

"I am." replied the reporter, whose name and temper are 
1 oth Irish. Lotto made a move and simultaneously the re- 
porter's fist collided with Lotto's eye-glasses. 

Lotto's next move was a decisive one toward his pistol 
pocket. There was a general scattering of onlookers, under 
tables and behind chairs, as Lotto drew from his business- 
pocket his ninety-five cent revolver, carefully wrapped in 
'hamois skin. With the precision of a watchmaker he un- 
wrapped the treasure, but no shots were fired. Some 
say the gun wasn't loaded. Others say that Lotto was. 

• • * 

"What's poorer than a poor man, sir?" 

A sage had cause to ask 
When he beheld Assessor Dodge 

Plying his civic task. 

The Doctor rubbed his honest palm, 

Which righteously did itch, 
"What poor man, pray," in turn he asked, 

"Is poorer than the rich?" 

• * * 

Mr. Ernest Simpson, city editor of the Chronicle, is said to 
be. able to express more in three words than any other 
man living. Hence this story: 

In the old lively days of the Spanish war, there was a cer- 
tain reporter whom we will call Smith, assigned lo Camp 
Merritt. One lively day a regiment from his home State 
showed up in camp with a bunch of his old friends. It was 
o merry meeting, and Smith looked upon the Scotch and soda 
so much that he came Into the office very late and in no 
condition for writing. He had to dictate his "dope" to an- 
other man. 

It was a great offense, and Smith appeared next day suf- 
fering from remorse and expecting the jacking-up of his life. 
From the inner office Mr. Simpson shouted: 

"Smith!" 

Smith appeared, pale and nervous. 

"Smith," said Mr. Simpson, "you may take Camp Merritt 
to-day — dry." 

* * * 

Lieutenant Anderson of the Southern Police made a haul 
of three drunks a few weeks ago. He was going from his 
house to the station when he caught them trying to loot 
a saloon. There was no patrolman in sight, so he rang for 
the wagon himself, threw them in with the help of the driver 
and drove them to headquarters. One was a fighting jag, 
one was simply stupid, and the other was jolly. The fighting 
jag had to be laid out with a blow from the Lieutenant's 
good right, but the jolly drunk made trouble all along the 
line, in his efforts to scramble out, to drop between the 
wheels, and to flirt with every woman in sight. Anderson 
pulled him out bodily at the station, and braced him 
against a wheel while he carried in the stupid jag. When he 
returned, the jolly drunk was still leaning against the 
wheel with his finger in his vest pocket. 

"Of'cer," said the jolly drunk; "of'cer — pay here?" 

* * * 

Mr. Bert Lees, the man behind the tickets at the Or- 
pheum, knows what it feels like to be a hero. The other 
day he was standing at the counter in a small but prosper- 
ous jewelry store up town. He was pricing a fancy pocket 



tlgar cutter, which the proprietor offered to him for 112. 
Intimating that he would take lens. During the Brgumont 
Which followed Mr Laos noticed that a large, black vol 
unteer had slipped his hand into a show case and was In the 
act of pocketing n $300 diamond ring. He tailed the proprle 
tor's attention to the fact, enught the negro and demanded 
the return of the ring, while the Jeweler stood by voicing his 
eternal gratitude. When the thief had been kicked out Into 
the street, buyer and seller returned to the neglected 
< igar cutter. 

"I can't think of charging you $12 for that cigar cutter 
after all you have Just done for me," said the proprietor 
pathetically. "I'll tell you what I'll do. Take It for $11, 
and God bless you." 



Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 
ures poison oak and all skin diseases. Sold by all druggists. 



Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. 

Cooper & Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 




St. Louis A. B. C. Beer, Pure, Pale and sparkling, the king 
of all Bottled Beers. 

JULY 

Overland 

Monthly 

112 PAGES-10 CENTS 

Summer Reading 

A splendid literary production by Cal 
fornia writers, illustrated by California artists. 

CONTENTS: 



The Transit of Bohemia — Story By Ednah Robinson 

Late Dusk in the Golden Gate — Poem By Theodore Gontz 

Our Legion of Honor , By James F. J. Archibald 

Some Famous Jewish Women.. By Rev. A. Kingsley-Glover 

When the Overland Comes in — Story By Roger J. Sterrett 

"Heathen" — Story ,. ., By Agnes Louise Provost 

The Zuleta — Story , By C. B. Acheson 

En Rapport — Poem , By Margaret Schenk 

The Law of the Medes and Persians.. By C. Bryant Taylor 

La Fiesta Dance — Poem.. ;. .By J. Torrey Connor 

The Biologist's Quest — Story John M. Oskison 

Broken Strings — Poem , i. .By E. R. Wynne 

In the Days of the Padres — Story. . . .By Harry R. P. Forbes 

Books: To Read or Not to Read 

Kern City and the Kern River Oil District. .By O. C. Ellison 
Price, 10 Cents a Number. $1.00 a Year. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 6, 1901. 




Investors in oil shares should see to it 

Fakers Robbing that they are not robbed by fakers who 

the Public. . are using the industry as an excuse tor 

manipulating a flim-flam game. A few 
acres of ground within blank miles of some well-known oil 
producer and a chapter or two of what they propose to do, 
and never intend to do, is the stock in trade of these vam- 
pires who are now milking the East, for the reason that 
11 ey are too well known here to do any mischief. Two scoun- 
drels engaged in the same kind of business got five years' 
penal servitude in London the other day, under the new 
Company's law which has been drawn up to cover cases 
where men fill prospectuses of promotion schemes with lies. 
They got away with the game in Britain until lately, but the 
law now on the statute books just fits the case, and Port- 
land or Dartmore will be the address for some years of these 
pestiferous wretches. It is fortunate for some individuals 
in this part of the world that this law did not exist in Eng- 
land some years ago, or their career of sin would have been 
cut short at an early date. Never before was there such a 
necessity of a similar law as there is at present. The 
Eastern press literally teems with advertising of California 
oil schemes, nine-tenths of which are frauds of the worst 
description. The statements are false and an investigation 
will prove this to be the case. Money is being subscribed 
daily by investors who will never get a penny of it back, 
and as usual in affairs of the kind, where "everybody's busi- 
ness is nobody's business," the thieving promoter will he al- 
lowed to scatter away out of sight eventually with his ill- 
gotten gains. Self-interest will keep the leading men of the 
oil industry from prosecuting these frauds. It takes time 
and money to use the courts with the chance that some rot- 
ten example of local juries would decide that it was only 
smart business after all. Missionary work on behalf of the 
defrauded outsider is often charity thrown away. They 
scoff at all warnings until they get trapped, and then, oh! 
what a howl! Still, it is not going to do California any good 
to have the oil industry wrecked for the benefit of a lot of 
sharpers. 

It is pleasant to note that 

State Mineralogist shows State Mineralogist Anbury 

His Mettle. has determined to put a stop 

to any company using the 
State's name in floating their wares upon the public. He has 
issued instructions to his assistants in the field that under 
no circumstances must they sign any report unless on work 
for the State which he directs, officially as Field Assistants, 
and has already removed one person for disobedience in this 
respect. In order to get around this, where such assistant 
does not sign officially, the designing promoter, he complains, 

heads his report, "as furnished by Mr. , Field Assistant 

to the State Mining Bureau." He threatens to give some 
of these individuals all the advertising they want, and in 
this he will undoubtedly have the assistance of the respect- 
able portion of the press. As he remarks, the assistants are 
employed part of the year at the State's expense, and are not 
allowed to make private examinations during that time. Af- 
ter the State work has been completed, they continue as 
private individuals, and are not at liberty to sign reports 
as being connected with State work. He mentions the Cop- 
per Giant Mining Company, with property on the Colorado 
River, and the Red Cloud Mining Company, of Riverside 
County, as the latest offenders, and while he does not dis- 
credit these properties, knowing nothing personally of their 
merits, they are not going to use the State's name if he can 
help it. Mr. Auhury is to be congratulated upon the position 
he has taken in this matter. His action will be endorsed 
by every one interested in the protection of mining invest- 
ors from loss at the hands of promoters who have grown 
bold with years of immunity from the consequences of their 
conduct. 



The Sweepstake Company is tack- 
Miles of Piping for ling the work of installing its 
Sweepstakes Mine. immense plant at its property in 

Trinity County with a vigor which 
.hows that they do not propose to let the grass grow under 
their feet. They have already let a contract for twenty- 
eight miles of 36-inch pipe and 10,000 feet of syphon. Some 
samples of gold from this great gravel deposit were shown 
en Pine street during the past week, and some of the nuggets 
in point of size were the equal of any yet imported into this 
city fromi the far-famed placers on the Yukon. Mining men 
who know something about the placer properties of Trinity 
have always contended that the Klondike would be out- 
rivaled if ever the right class of investors took hold of them. 
The difficulties of the undertaking scared the majority of ex- 
perts who have reported upon these mines in the past, but 
from all appearances the men and the money have arrived 
at last. The development of the Sweepstakes mine will 
now be watched with the greatest interest by all who believe 
in the bonanza character of this ground, a belief well- 
founded, judging from the samples of the gold extracted in 
doing prospect work recently. 

Tuesday and Wednesday ended 
The Local Financial financial operations in the Stock 
Markets. and Bond, Mining, and Oil Ex- 

changes in this city, and the volume 
of business transacted in all of them was light, as it gener- 
ally is at this period of the year. Most of the leading brok- 
ers and operators left town early in the week to derive as 
much benefit as possible out of the holidays, and they did 
not lose much by their departure. In the Stock and Bond 
Exchange prices were steadier as a rule. A good bond busi- 
ness was transacted in June, amounting to $426,100 as 
against sales valued at $264,900 in the same month last year. 
In stocks the sales were 26,506 against 21,660 in June, 1900. 
Up to date the transactions for the year amounted to 
$3,619,760 in bonds and 239,762 shares. The mining market 
showed no change worthy of note, prices closing moderately 
firm at the north-end and quiet at the south-end. The oil 
markets were both dull and weak. 

The annual report of the Hi- 
The Hibernia Savings and hernia Savings and Loan So- 
Loan Society. ciety appears in this issue of 

the News Letter, for the per- 
iod ended June 30, 1901. The total assets amount to 
$52,011,601.51, of which $21,063,680.17 is invested in bonds 
of the United States; $22,743,530.60 in mortgages on real 
estate, with the balance in bonds. The cash on hand 
amounts to $2,027,247.31, and the reserve fund is $3,101,- 
519.65. The flourishing condition of this institution is due 
to the sterling reputation it maintains in financial circles 
and the reliance placed upon it by the industrial classes 
of the community as a depository for their accumulations. 
This strong financial policy maintained by the management 
of this sterling concern, under the direction of Mr. Robert J. 
Tobin, who has for so many years directed its affairs, can he 
accepted as the main basis for the high position the Hibernia 
holds among the banking institutions of the world. 

In view of the slump which has taken 
Figures Which place in the Stocks of California oil 
Tell a Story. Companies, the list of mine dividends 
paid in June is interesting by way of 
comparison with the profits for the same period by one oil 
concern alone, with the knowledge, of course, that its in- 
terests in the industry are many and diversified. The 
mining dividends were paid by the States as follows: Cali- 
fornia, $25,000; Arizona, $12,500; Colorado, $206,519; Utah, 
$55,000; Idaho, $71,544; Nevada, $26,100; South Dakota, 
$105,000; Michigan (copper), $2,387,700; Missouri (lead), 
$42,500; Montana, $15,000, and British Columbia, $39,000. 
This represents a total of $2,985,863. During the same month 
the Standard Oil Company paid in dividends $12,000,000. 
All persons who are directly in- 
To Further Interests of terested in the welfare and ad- 
Oil Industry. vancement of the oil industry 
of this State, should join the 
California Petroleum; Miners' Association and give it their 
support in every manner. It has now passed into the hands 
of a board of management which is reliable and trustworthy, 
and one which can be depended upon to maintain the dignity 



July •■ 'Ml. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



15 



• it the Association, while uslnir, every means possible lo make 
II That It Is Intended to be — a powerful adjunct In building 
up and protecting this young and Important industry. The 
'nrs. through their President, Mr. M II da Toon 
■ ity. Dr. C T Deone, hare just Issoed a clrcolai 
to the oil men throughout the Stat-' s.tting forth tl 

■riatlon. and requesting (heir co-operation. 
As a bureau of Information about companies and lands, 
the clerical facilities at the command of the board of manage- 
ment are already severely tested, ami the companies owe it 

to themselves to keep as closely In touch with the Associa- 
tion as possible, and put It In a position where it ran give 
full and complete details in answer to the enquiries pouring 
in dally from all quarters, but principally from the Eastern 
States. The fees asked are small in comparison with the ser- 
vices rendered to companies and individuals, and within 
■ each of every decent company operating on the Coast, 
which should certainly be registered on the books of the 
Association. It is desired especially to issue bulletins of 
statistics through the press, furnishing information as to 
the standing of companies, to assist legislative action, distrib- 
ute reports, and in every way to cultivate proper and con- 
servative action in oil mining. The annual fees for com- 
panies and firms is $25 per annum; individuals $12, with an 
entrance fee of $10. 



UNLISTED SECURITIES. 
Oil Stocks. 
Which undersigned offers (or sale at the following prices: 



500 San Antonio 

1000 Bachelors (Sunset). 

2000 General Ol eaves 


15 1000 California Crude- 

04 500 California Fortune 

12i4 250 Lake «fe Colusa O & L 

05 luilO Kern River Oil Con- .... 


25 

:5 

3 0J 






1000 Lone Star (sunset) 


05 1000 Lion 


13 










05 500 Sovereign 

05 1000 Superior. 


3? 

18 


loOO Sunset Crude 

1000 Superior Extension. 

7500 Mouarch 

1000 Transcontinental 


05 lOOO Superior Develop 

01 500Occiden-al 

31 500 Eclipse O & Devel.. ... 

15 500 Kern Valley 

00% 500 Wellington 

01 1000 Contra Costa O Petr 

45 


05 
52 
10 
18 
05 
01 


1100 Famosa 


30 



Anyone wishing to buy any of the above oil stock wilt make an immense 
saving by buying them from undersigned, who guarantees lowest prices 
against all and any offerings. Listed stockB at market price- 
Orders for buying or selling above stocks (listed and unlisted) promptly 
attended to by - 

Joseph B. Toplitz, Stock Broker, 
Member Producers' Oil Exchange. Rooms 9 aud 10, 330 Pine street. 



' A Russian author has defined humor as "an Invisible 

tear seen through a visible smile"; and it is in somewhat 
this sense that an American critical writer, Mr. George 
Wright Buckley, treats of the "Wit and Wisdom of Jesus" in 
r, recent book of that title. The humor of Jesus, he says, 
was akin in religion to that of Thomas Carlyle in literature, 
or to that of the sad and thoughtful Lincoln in politics; 
but just as "some of the choicest specimens of antique art 
were lost in the accumulated rubbish of centuries, to be 
resurrected by the zealous efforts of modern archeologists, 
so the Son of Man was lost," in the aftergrowths of belief 
that hare sprung up around His personality. 



Captain Evan Howell, a Georgia cavalry officer, was 

talking the other day in Washington, D. C, to Senator 
llatt about insomnia. "Now, suh," he said, "I have a sure 
cure for insomnia, and it is as simple as it is sure. When 
you go to bed and can't sleep, get up and take a drink. Go 
tack to bed and wait half an hour. If you do not go to sleep, 
get up and take another drink. Repeat this, suh, at intervals 
of half an hour. If you do not go to sleep for four times, 
making four drinks, then, suh, if you are not asleep you will 
not care whether you sleep or not." 



A Good Milk 
for infant feeding is a mixed Cow's milk, from herds of na- 
tive breeds. Borden's Eagle Brand Condensed Milk herds 
pie properly housed, scientifically fed, and are constantly 
under trained inspection. Avoid unknown brands. 



Emperor Oil Co. 

X£>2£. Sunset District $1 £ JJ 

KERN CO., CALIFORNIA. 



A.C. LIEBENDORFER, Pres., 

llnkcrsncld. OH. 



E. H. LOVELAND, Soc. 
Kakcrsticld. Cnl. 



St. Louis A. B. C. Beer, Pure, Pale and Sparkling, the king 
of all bottled Beers. 



OFFICE OF COMPANY. 1910 CHESTER AVENUE. BAKERSFIELD. 

This company owns 340 acres of land In the Sunset 
and Midway Oil Districts. On the 20 acres of their 
Sunset holdings they have completed ONE well, which 
is now producing 150 barrels of oil per day, and -have 
the second well under way. 

The company has not been offering any stock for sale, 
preferring to first demonstrate and prove that they 
own 

OIL BEARING TERRITORY 

which they have now done with their own money. 
To further develop their property and increase pro- 
duction the company has decided to offer a limited 
amount of 

Treasury Stock for Sale at 45 Cents 

per share. This stock will have to be taken imme- 
diately to be procured at this figure, for with the 
further development and increase of production the 
price of the stock will be advanced. 
The company now expects to begin paying dividends 
in the near future. Any one wishing to buy stock 
which has MERIT, cannot do better than to invest in 



EMPEROR 



All information given, inquiries promptly answered 
and prospectus furnished by addressing 

E.H. LOVELAND, Sec, 1910 Chester ave., Bakerfield, Cal. 

Reference: The Bank of Bakersfield. 



200,000 H. P. 

Developed by 

Pelton Wheels 

Operating electric trans- 
mission plants alone : : : 

Sensitive Regulation 

Send fur illustrated catalogue. 

THE 
PELTON WATER WHEEL CO. 
127 Main St. San Francisco. Cal- 
143 Liberty St., New York, N.Y- 




nining riachinery s n uP p„ e8 

The Ropp Straight Line Furnace. 

Huntington Centrifugal Roller Mill. 

Bartlett Concentrating Table. 

James Ore Feeder. 

Roger Improved Crushing Rolls. 

Dodge Rock Breakers and Pulverizers. 

Two and Three Stamp Mills. 

Engines, Boilers, Steam and Power Pumps. 

Wood-Working and Iron-Working Machinery. 

PARKE & LACY CO. 21 and 23 Fremont **<">*■ 



16 



SAN FRANCI8CO NEW8 LETTER. 



July 6, 1901. 



GaLirvsborovighs a^nd Frizzes 



By Mrs. Chauncey De Wit. 

Coming events cast their shadow before, and already 
the girls are standing before their mirrors trying the new 
style of hair dress which the forerunners of fashion assure 
us will prevail during the winter. Fancy discarding the 
stately pompadour for a lot of frizzes and lowering our soft 
top knots to the nape of the neck where the hair is coiled 
in a figure eight with variations. Never consistent, fashion 
further insists on Gainsborough hats. Now how can a pic- 
ture hat ever accommodate itself to that style of coiffure? 
Out of the tail of my eye I can already see some of the girls 
—the little girls like Marie. Louise and Daisy Parrott, with 
their hair dressed low and mammoth sky-pieces drooping 
over bangs! And the tall girls will look almost as bad. 
Fancy Ruth McNutt or Therese Morgan! Women used to be 
brighter than they looked— that was in the day of forehead 
fringes. Since we roll our hair becomingly away from our 
foreheaas. many of us are accused of even more intellect 
than we would care to cart around with us, especially in hot 
weather. In Europe the low coil and frizz already prevails, 
so our day of hirsute doom must be lowering. Miss Pudge and 
Miss Lank will both have to fall in line to be modish. 

We may find some way of adjusting it, just as the clever 
cnes twisted the pompadour to suit individual styles. From 
a hideous stiff roll propped by a "rat," it evoluted into a 
soft, artistic wave that drooped or parted as was most be- 
coming. The fastidious girl has never accepted the care- 
fully draped puff of hair falling over the left eyelid, which 
has been popularized by the vaudeville artistes. I don't 
know any girl who has so well mastered the problem of the 
arranging her hair as Ethel Hager. Of course, she has un- 
usually pretty hair to work with, but she frames her face 
with it in a very fetching fashion. A bow of narrow ribbon 
caught where the hair droops, and standing crisp and taut, 
one loop and end coming well over the forehead, is a pretty 
trick by which Miss Hager accentuates her coiffure. 

• * • 

A quaint conceit to wear with elbow sleeves is a broad 
band of black velvet ribbon tied around the wrist in a co- 
quettish little bow or fastened with a small brooch. It not 
only makes the hands look whiter and hides the ring of sun- 
burn, but is an odd addition to the costume. Some of the 
girls are cutting tiny slits in their long evening gloves, and 
through these black velvet ribbon is run, a smart little bow 
bugging the outside of the arm. 

• • • 

For afternoon wear, besides white, palest of pearl tints, 
pale fawns, biscuit shades and pale tans prevail. For the 
forenoon deeper tans and fawns, as well as white wash 
suedes are worn. To properly dress the hand one must have 
a large supply of gloves to choose from. 

* • * 

Despite the oft-repeated statement made by scribes that 
society has taken to sunburn like the sunflower turns to its 
god, I do not know a woman who faces the sun ungloved 
and unhatted, unless there is absolute necessity for it. 
She may play golf with her sleeves rolled back and the sun 
beating down on her hands, but depend upon it, she anti- 
dotes the effect by wearing gloves at night, and trying every 
skin bleaching process known to chemistry. Just before 
Mary Scott's wedding, four of her bridesmaids, whose sum- 
mer homes are down Blingum way, came to town for a lunch- 
eon at the Grill Room, and the matinee afterwards. I heard 
the girls bemoaning their sunburned hands and swapping 
recipes to make them once more lily white. 

* • * 

Philippine hats, the genuine article, are in great demand 
in New York. Modish folk wear them at the seaside and 
mountain, crushing in their high crowns and winding about 
the brim a soft drapery of the pretty fibre gauze that is made 
in Manila. Mrs. Ashton Potter is being besieged to help 
some of our girls get these picturesque chapeaus, and Mrs. 
Crimmons has already sent several fortunate friends Philip- 
pine hats. 

*,» » 

A "raglan" waist is the latest outrage against good taste. 
An ultra-smart matron attempted one at San Rafael the other 



day without reaping any flattering comments. The "raglan" 
waist, like its step-sister the coat, is distinguished by the 
way its loose sleeves fit on up the shoulder to neckband. 
* * * 
Wealthy people do not dress their children nearly as 
well as the offsprings of the tradespeople are frocked. The 
little sisters of the rich are usually clad like Cinderellas. 
No wonder Jennie Crocker was round-eyed with admiration 
ever the dainty little frock she wore at Mary Scott's wedding. 
Her grandmother does not believe in spoiling little girls 
with fine feathers, and when Jennie was attending private 
school here she was invariably dressed, or rather "aproned," 
in a blue gingham affair. Little Flossie Hopkins is dressed 
as plainly as her grown-up sisters are elaborately gowned. 
The same might be said of dozens of other gold-spoon young- 
sters. On the whole, the simple fashion in which the child- 
ren of the sensible rich are dressea is a commentary on 
the vulgar display of the parvenues. 



SPENDING MONEY. 

When I was a little boy 

Just about the size you be, 

Daddy used to say to me: 

"When I was a little boy 

Little children didn't try 

To spend their money all at once 

On the Fourth o' July. 

"When I was a little boy 

Jest as poor as I could be," 

(Daddy used to say to me), 

"All my holiday expense 

Wasn't more than sixteen cents — 

Now it seems, my lad, you oughter 

Not spend much more'n a quarter." 

When I was a little lad 
Not much bigger 'n you be, 
Then I understood my dad 
Better'n he knew me. 
And I gen'rally used to say 
In an off-hand sort o' way: 
"i jest bet you if your dad 
Had a-been as smart as you 
He'd been rich and would o' had 
To give up a dollar or two." 

When I was a little lad 

That would always fetch my dad. 

Now I've come of age and grown 

To have children of my own. 

When the glorious Fourth comes round, 

With its avalanche o' sound, 

Kid, I'd like to work the same 

Old hereditary game 

"When I was a little boy 
Jest about, the size ye be, 
Daddy used to say to me" 

Pshaw! This foxy talk, I see, 

Is durned poor economy. 

An' you'll get it anyway. 

So I'd best shut up an' pay; 

For I reckon, little lad, 

That you're smarter than your dad. 



Green okra, fresh pineapples, melons, all kinds of 

fiuits and vegetables at Omey & Goetting's stalls 33, 34, 45 
and 46 California Market. Goods always fresh. 



St. Louis A. B. C. Beer, Pure, Pale and sparkling, the king 
of all bottled Beers. 



PUY81CIAN6 would not recommend Jesse Moore Whiskey II they did not 
know It to be the best In the market. 



St. Louis A. B. C. Beer, Pure, Pale and Sparkling, the king 
of all bottled Beers, 



July 6. 1901. 



• AN FRANCISCO NEWt LETTER. 



17 



STATEMENT OF THE CONDITION AND VALUE OF THE 

ASSETS AND LIABILITIES OF 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

A CORPORATION, 
and where said Assets are situated, dated June 30, 1901. 



ASSETS. 

1 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby 

secured, the actual value of which is $22,743,530 60 

The condition of said Promissory Notes 
and debts is as follows: They are all 
existing contracts, owned by said Corpor- 
ation, and are payable to it at its office, 
which is situated at the corner of Market, 
McAllister and Jones streets, in the City 
and County of San Francisco, State of Cali- 
fornia, and the payment thereof is secured 
by First Mortgages on Real Estate within 
this State and the States of Oregon and 
Washington. Said Promissory Notes are 
kept and held by said Corporation at its 
said office, which is its principal place of 
business, and said Notes and debts are 
there situated. 
2 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby 

secured, the actual value of which is 302,500 00 

The condition of such Promissory Notes 
and debts is as follows: They are all exist- 
ing Contracts, owned by said Corporation, 
and are payable to it at its office, which is 
situated as aforesaid, and the payment 
thereof is secured by "Northern Railway 
Company of California 5 per cent Bonds," 
"Southern Pacific Railroad Company of 
California 6 per cent Bonds," "San Fran- 
cisco and San Joaquin Valley Railway 
Company 5 per cent Bonds," "Market Street 
Railway Company First Consolidated Mort- 
gage 5 per cent Gold Bonds," "Park and 
Cliff House Railway Company 6 per cent 
Bonds," "Los Angeles Railway Company 
5 per cent Bonds," "Spring Valley Water 
Works First Mortgage 6 per cent Bonds," 
"Spring Valley Water Works Second Mort- 
gage 4 per cent Bonds," and "Pacific Gas 
Improvement Company First Mortgage 
4 per cent Bonds," the market value of all 
said Bonds being $352,130.00. Said Notes 
are kept and held by said Corporation at 
its said office, and said Notes and Bonds 
are there situated. 
3 — Bonds of the United States, the actual 

value of which is 21,063,680 17 

The condition of said Bonds is as follows: 
They belong to said Corporation, and are 
kept and held by it in its own vaults and 
are there situated. They are "Registered 

4 per cent of 1907 ($18,000,000.00) and 4 
per cent of 1925 ($1,000,000.00) and 3 per 
cent of 1908 ($500,000.00) United States 
Bonds," and are payable only to the order 
of said Corporation. 

4 — Miscellaneous Bonds, the actual value of 

which is 4,003,943 49 

The condition of said Bonds is as follows: 
They belong to said Corporation, and are 
kept and held by it in its own vaults, and 
are there situated. They are "Market 
Street Cable Railway Company 6 per cent 
Bonds ($999,000,000)," "Market Street Rail- 
way Company First Consolidated Mortgage 

5 per cent Bonds ($339,000.00)," "Sutter 
Street Railway Company 5 per cent Bonds 
($150,000 000)," "Powell Street Railway 



Company 6 per cent Bonds ($50,000 00)," 
"The Omnibus Cable Company 6 per 
cent Bonds ($82,000 00)," "Presidio and 
Ferries Railroad Company 6 per cent Bonds 
($25,000.00)," "Northern Railway Com- 
pany of California 6 per cent Bonds 
($545,000.00)," "San Francisco and North 
Pacific Railway Company 5 per cent Bonds 
($364,000.00)," "Spring Valley Water 
Works First Mortgage 6 per cent Bonds 
($78,000.00)," "Spring Valley Water Works 
Second Mortgage 4 per cent Bonds ($462,- 
000.00)," "Spring Valley Water Works 
Third Mortgage 4 per cent Bonds ($533,- 
000.00)," and "City of San Luis Obispo 5 per 
cent Bonds ($22,500.30)." 

5 — Interest on Miscellaneous Bonds accrued to 
July 1, 1901 . ., 260,637 26 

6 — (a) Real Estate situated in the City and 
County of San Francisco ($590,362.55), and 
in the Counties of Santa Clara ($260,338.57), 
Alameda ($160,206.61), and San Mateo 
($29,312.96), in this State, the actual value 

of which is 1,040,220 69 

(b) The land and building in which said 
Corporation keeps its said office, the actual 

value of which is 569,841 99 

The condition of said Real Estate is that 
it belongs to said Corporation and part of 
it is productive. 

7 — Cash in United States Gold and Silver 
Coin, belonging to said Corporation, and in 
its possession, and situated at its said office, 
Actual Value ; . . . 2,027,247 31 

Total Assets $52,011,601 51 

LIABILITIES. 

1 — Said Corporation owes Deposits amounting 

to and the actual value of which is $48,910,081 86 

The condition of said Deposits is that 
they are payable only out of said Assets 
and are fully secured thereby. 

2 — Reserve Fund, Actual Value 3,101,519 65 

Total Liabilities $52,011,601 51 

The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, by JAMES R. 

KELLY, President. 
The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, by ROBERT J. 

TOBIN, Secretary. 

City and County of San Francisco. \ 

State of California, }**' 

JAMES R. KELLY and ROBERT J. TOBIN, being each 
separately duly sworn, each for himself, says: That said 
JAMES R. KELLY is President, and that said ROBERT 
J. TOBIN is secretary of THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND 
LOAN SOCIETY, the Corporation above mentioned, and that 
the foregoing statement is true. 

JAMES R. KELLY, President, 
ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

Subscribed' and' sworn to before me this 1st day of July, 
1901. 

GEO. T. KNOX, Notary Public, 
In and for the City and County of San Francisco, State of 
California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 6, 1901. 




Negotiations were completed last week, under the terms 
of which the entire outstanding business of the North Ger- 
man Insurance Company of Hamburg, Germany, with the 
exception of its risks in Cook County, Illinois, and on the 
Pacific Coast, were reinsured in the Western Assurance 
Company of Toronto. The deal was engineered by Mr. 
gumner Ballard of New York, who thus adds another to his 
already long list of successful reinsurance transactions. 
Messrs. Adolph Loeb & Son, of Chicago, will continue as 
United States managers, restricting their operations to the 
above territory. The reinsurance does not in any way 
affect the North German Insurance Company of New York, 
of which Mr. E. Harbers is general manager. The trans- 
action is not nearly as large as it would have been in June 
of last year, as about that time the North German com- 
menced to cancel large lines and reduce its business. 
* * * 

In some points, plate glass companies are complaining 
of rate cutting and rebating on part of agents. All the com- 
panies except the Pacific Surety are in the home office 
agreement, although the Union Casualty is out at Chicago. 
Rates are generally well-maintained, although at a few 
points fire insurance agents are given to rebating the 

plate glass premiums. 

* * • 

Mr. Rolla V. Watt is rapidly recovering from an illness that 
has confined him to the house during the past two weeks. 
At one time his condition was considered decidedly critical. 

* * * 

Some conscience-stricken person having deceived the 
Fire Association of Philadelphia, took this novel method of 
refunding the over-plus: The assured stated, in a letter, that 
a recent loss he had sustained was not so great as he had 
claimed. He offered to return the money if the Fire Asso- 
ciation would indicate its wishes to receive it by displaying 
a white cloth in the office window. The officers did so, 
though not pinning much faith to the offer. An hour later 
a messenger boy appeared with an envelope which, on being 
opened, was found to contain bills to the amount of $100. 

* * * 

The Teutonia Fire Insurance Company of Philadelphia 
closed a contract for the reinsurance of all its outstanding 
risks, except perpetual, with the National Fire Insurance 
Company of Hartford, on June 18th. The entire premium 
income of the Teutonia for the year ending December 31, 
1900, not including perpetual, was 540,840.01; total income, 
$53,644.01; total admitted assets, $275,054.56; capital stock, 
$200,000; surplus above capital, $21,311.40. The National 
I- ire has purchased of the Teutonia its four-story building at 
424 Walnut street, which will be modernized and utilized 
for handling the Philadelphia business of the National. 

* * * 

Mr. Henry Houghton, who died last week, had been mana- 
ger of the Aetna Life Insurance Company of Hartford for 
eight years past. He was very popular with all who knew 
him, a member of the Bohemian Club and prominent in 
society circles. 

* * * 

Insurance is not a commodity, and the legal advisor of 
Governor Toole of Montana says: "Unless insurance can be 
construed to be a commodity, or an article of commerce, 
it is impossible under the present statutes of Montana to 
prosecute a company on the charge of being a party to a 
pool or so-called trust." The question of the Governor was 
on the legality or illegality of the board of fire underwriters 
of the Pacific Coast, having headquarters in Montana at 
Butte. It was claimed by some that this board was merely 
a pool or trust of the insurance companies transacting busi- 
ness in the State, and was detrimental to the interests of 
the public. Governor Toole some tim,e ago asked the Attor- 
ney-General for an opinion as to the possibility of applying 
the present law to this case. There have been no decisions 



by the Montana Supreme Courts, but the highest tribunal 
of other States have passed upon almost exactly the same 
I oint. Many of these States have laws almost identical with 
that of Montana, therefore the same questions arose. 

* * * 

Two expensive fires during the past week in unprotected 
Arizona towns, aggregating over one million dollars, are mak- 
ing those companies, which in greed for business have been 
tempted to carry lines in that territory, extremely nervous, 
and is likely to materially lower their Coast loss ratios. 



You will never make a mistake in calling for J. F. 

Cutter whisky. It is smooth, oily and palatable, and leaves 
none of the bad effects that follow drinking poor whisky. 
The best bars keep it and the most fastidious people drink 
it. Take some on your camping trip. E. Martin & Co., 
54 First street, sole agents for the United States. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 610 Montgomery street, 

San Francisco, deals In all kinds of newspaper Information, 
business, personal, political, from press of State, Coast, and 
country Tel. Main 1042. 



St. Louis A. B. C. Beer, Pure, Pale and Sparkling, the king 
of all bottled Beers. 



SOUTHFIELD WELLINGTON COAL 
order from any coal dealer. 



Trusts and combinations do not aftect Jesse Moore Whisky. Its fame is 
established, its qu >lity is the finest and it is always the best. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society. 

The Board of Directors declared a dividend for the term endingr June 30, 
1901. at the rate of three and one-eighth (3 1 ;.) per cent per annum on all 
deposits free of taxes, and payable on and after July 1. 1901. Dividends 
not called for are added to, and bear the same rate of dividend as the prin- 
cipal from and after July 1. 1901. 

CYRUS W. CARMANV. Cashier. 

Office — 101 Montgomery St., cor. Sutter St., San Francisco, Cat. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE, 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Company. 

For the six months ending June 30. 1901, dividends have been de- 
clared on deposits in the Savings Department of this Company as follows; 
On Term Deposits, at the rate of three sir-tenths (3 6-10) per cent per 
annum, and on Ordinary Deposits at the rate of three (3) per cent per annum, 
free of taxes, and pnyable on and after Monday, July. I, 1901. Divi- 
dends uncalled for are added to the principal and bear the same rate of 
dividend as the pticcipal from and after July 1, 1901. 

J. DALZELL BROWN, Seoretary. 

Cor. California and Montgomery Sts„ San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Security Savings Bank. 

For the half year ending June 29th, 1901. dividends on term deposits at 
the rate of three and six-tenths (3 6-10) per cent- per annum, and on ordi- 
nary deposits at the rate of three 13) per cent- per annum, free of taxes, 
will be payable on and after July 1, 1901. S. L- ABBOTT. JR.. Seoretary. 

Office— 222 Montgomery Str eet, Mill s Building. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half-year ending June 30th, 1901, a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of three (3) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, 

payable on and after Monday, July 1. 1901. 

GEORGE A. STORY, Cashier. 
33 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year ending with June 30. 1901. a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of three and one eighth (3%) per cent per annum on 
all deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Monday, July 1. 1901. 

GEORGE TOURNY. Secretary. 
526 California street. San Frjncisco. Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of thiB society, held June 
28. 1901. a dividend has been declared at the rate of three and one-eighth 
(3%) per cent, per annum on all deposits for the six months ending June 30, 
1901, free from all tnxes, and payable on and after July 1, 1901. 

ROBERT J. TOBIN. Secretary. 

Office— Corner Market, McAllister and Jones streets, San Francisco, Cal , 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

For the half year ending with the 30th of June, 1901, a dividend has been 

been declared at the rate per annum of three nnd six-tenths (3 6-10) per 

cent, on term deposits nnd three (3) per cent on ordinary deposits, free of 

taxes, payable on and after Monday. July 1, 1901. 

LOVELL WHITE. Cashier. 
Office — 532 California street, oorner Webb streets, San Franolsco. 



July 6. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



19 




First Hotelkeeper— Yes: I am goinn to have the sea-ser- 
pent attraction again this year. Second Hotelkeeper— That 
is old. I am going to have n young woman wade out beyond 
her depth every hour. I have just ordered a few gross of 
t, and each rescuer will )»■ presented with one. 

Farmer Honk— What sort of people are your city relatives 
that are vlsitin' up at your house, 'Gustus? Farmer Bent- 
hack (grimly i— Aw: They're the kind that when they pay 
ye a visit act like they wanted a receipt for it. 

Tillets — Tyrder looked very sad when he heard that tele- 
phoning across the ocean is possible. Crustham — I suppose 
he did, poor fellow. It will he an unhappy day for him when 
he cannot get beyond the reach of his wife's voice." 

"He seems quite celebrated as an author, and yet he has 
written very little.'' "Yes, for you see pretty much every- 
thing he does it silly enough to afford material for a literary 
anecdote." 

Hodkinson — Splitter's automobile is something of a nov- 
elty, is it not? It seems to be made in two separate parts. 
Peter — Oh, you must have seen it since he divided it with a 
lamp-post. 

Mrs. Hoon — "Why are people who get married often called 
the "contracting parties"? Mr. Hoon — I don't know about 
the bride, but think how small the groom usually looks! 

The Lion (before the game) — We'd better toss up to see 
who goes to bat first. The Elephant (picking up monkey 
and tossing it in the air) — What do you say — head or tail? 

Smithers — How old are you? Miss Randolph — Oh, I don't 
tell my age. As old as I look. Smithers (with deep feeling) 
—No! 

"It is shameful the way the allies have treated the Chi- 
nese!" "Yes, but perhaps it has kept them from quarreling 
with each other." 

Tommy — Say, Jimmie, what is classical music? Jimmie — 
It's the kind you can't understand unless you wear long hair. 

Judge — Have you formed any opinion on this case? Would- 
beigh Juror — No, sir; I haven't mentioned it to my wife. 




Why experiment with other brands when you can Bret Jesse Moore 
Whiskey at all times and places ? 

Pacific Coast Department 

G. H.WARD, 

Manager, 

337 PINE STREET, 
INSURANCE COMPANY Sar. Francisco, Ca 

OB" TS-K-HTBrpoRT Phone, Maln'5509. 

New Amsterdam Casualty Company 

of New York 

405 Montgomery St., San Francisco. Cal, 

Edmund P. Green. Manager. Jesse W. Lilienthal, Attorney. 

Employers' Liability, Accident, Burglary and Salary Insurance. 

Fire Association, of Philadelohia 
Philadelphia Underwriters, of Philadelphia 

PENIS 

J. M. BECK, Manager 
219 Sansome street, San Francisco, Cal. 



" INSURANCE CO. 

of Broot^lyn 



112 MONTGOMERY ST., S. F. 

hi. McD. SPENGER, 

General Agent for 

Pacific Coast, British Columbia 
and Hawaiian Islands. 



INSURANCE. 



FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE 



FIREMANS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Capital $1,000,000 Assets, $4,000,000 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 



OF LONDON. ENGLAND 



C- F. MULLINS. Manager, 416-118 California street. S. F. 
FIRE INSURANCE 



Founded A. D. 1792 

Insurance Oompany of / lorth A 



merica 



OP PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital 13.000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders (5,022.016 

JAMES D. BAILEY. General Agent, 412 California Btreet, S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720 
Capital Paid Up, $3,446,100 Assets. 124.662.043.36 

Surplus to Policy Holders, (8,030.481.41. Losses Paid Over, (184,000,000.00 

PACIFIC COAST BRANCH: 

601 Montgomery street. 
FRANK W. DICKSON, Manager 

HERMANN NATHAN & PAUL F. KINGSTON. Local Managers. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New Zealand Insurance Company 

of New Zealand 
Capital. $5,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office In company's building, 312 California street 

W. P. THOMAS, Manager 
Hooker &, Lent, City Agents, 14 Post street 

Phoenix Assurance Co., of London 

Established 1782 

Providence-Washington Insurance Company 

Incorporated 1799 
BUTLER & HEWITT. General Agents 413 California street, S. F. 

Gonnecticut Fire Insurance Co. 

OF HARTFORD 

Cash Capital (1,000,000.00 

Cash Assets 4,081,895.13 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,092,661.01 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager 
COLIN M. BOYD, San Francisco agent, 411 California street. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) OF LIVERPOOL 

Capital (6,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents 316 California street, S, F. 

The Thuringia Insurance Company 

of ERFURT, GERMANY 
Capital, (2,250,000 Assets, (10,984,248 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Manage 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome street, S. F. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany 

N. Schlesslnger, City Agent. 304 Montgomery St., S. T. 



ANDERSON SPRINGS. 

Only natural Mineral Steam Baths in 

LAKE COUNTY. 
Hot Sulphur and Iron Baths. 
Board: $10 to $14 per week. 
Baths free. Address, 

J. ANDERSON, Anderson Springs, Middletown, 
Lake County, California. 

Fare, San Francisco to Springs and return reduced 
to $8. Send for circular. 
Full particulars at S. F. News Letter, 5i/ 2 Kearny St., S. F. 

HOBERG'S RESORT. 

Pleasantly located in a pine forest three thousand 
five hundred feet altitude; highest elevation, low- 
est price. First-class family table and pleasant 

rooms, eight dollars per week. 
Surrounding scenery unsurpassed by any springs 
In the immediate vicinity. Stage daily. Buy tickets 
direct for Hoberg's, Lake County, California. 

George Kammerer and Mrs. M. Hoberg, Proprietors. 

Full particulars at S. F. News Letter office. 

HOTEL BENVENUE AND COTTAGES. 

LAKEPORT, CAL. 
LAKEPORT'S SUMMER RESORT. Situated overlooking 
the shore on Clear Lake. New pavilion, boathouse, and bowl- 
ing alley. Open all the year. Special facilities for accommo- 
dating families with children; home cooking; boating, bath- 
ing, hunting, and superior fishing. Lovely drives and walks. 
Rates: $7 per week. 

FRANK & A. M. SCALES, Proprietors. 

LAUREL DELL LAKE 

LAKE COUNTY. 
THE ORIGINAL SWITZERLAND OF AMERICA. 

Fishing, Hunting, Boating, (new boats) Tennis, Bowling 
Alley, Dancing and Music, best and largest dance hall In 
Lake County, beautiful drives and walks, new and first class 
livery Largest dining room in Lake County, built over lake. 
Cottages. 

Under new management. Address, 

EDGAR DURNAN, 
Laurel Dell, Lake County, Cal. 



CYPRESS VILLA. 



B STREET, San Rafael, near Narrow Gauge. 

NOW OPEN. This favorite resort has been newly 
furnished and has undergone an entire renovation. 
For families, tourists, and the public generally, the 
accommodations are unexcelled. Board by day, 
week or month. New management. 

MRS. WARBURTON, Proprietor. 



Blue 



THE SWITZERLAND OF AMERICA. 
Boating (new boats), bathing, fishing and 
hunting. Dancing and music every even- 
ing except Sundays. Best dance hall in 
Lake County. Fine table; only white 
cooks employed. Send for new pamphlet 

O. WEISMAN, Midlake P. O., Lake County, Cal. 



DUNCAN SPRINGS. 

HOPLAND, CAL. 

Lovely drive of two miles from station to hotel. 
Terms: $10 to $12. Best medicinal waters In the 
State. Housekeeping cottages to rent. 
O. HOWELL, Hopland, Cal. 



PARAISO HOT SPRINGS. 

The Carlsbad of America 

Open Winter and Summer 

Monterey County, Cal. C. T. Romie, Proprietor 



Lakes 



SKAGGS' HOT SPRINGS. 



Sonoma County, only 4% hours from San Francisco; but 9 miles 
staging; waters noted for medicinal virtues; best natural bath in 
State; good trout streams; telephone, telegraph, daily mail and ex- 
press: trst-class hotel and stage service; morning and afternoon 
stages. Round trip from San Francisco, only ?."■.. 50. Take Tiburon 
ferry at 7.30 a. m. or 3.3 i p. m. Terms, 82 per day or 8l2 per week. 
References: Any guest of the past bis years. For further informa- 
tion address 

J. F. MULGREW, Proprietor. 
SKAQQS. GAL. 



HOWARD SPRINGS. 



picturesquely situated amidst the ptne forests of Lake County — the 
Switzerland of America. Elevation 2300 feet; no foe; o.imate perfect. 
Natural hot mineral plunge and tub bathH, line medicinal drinkln&r 
water. Excellent fishing and hunting. Telephone on premises. 
Rates, 810 and 812, with special terms for families. Ac- 
comodations, table and service first-class. Round trip from San 
Francisco, via Napa, Caiistoga, 810, including: line stage drive. 
For accommodations and further particulars address 



MRS. R. J. BEEBY, Proprietor. 



HOTEL MOUNT VIEW. 

CHANGED HANDS. Will hereafter be open the year 
round. Bus meets 9.30 and 11 o'clock trains from city at 
present. The culinary department will receive special 
atteniion. For rates and particulars address, 

Hotel Mount View, Ross Valley, Marin County, Cal. 

PACIFIC CONGRESS SPRINGS. 

An ideal spot in the Santa Cruz Mountains, Two hours 
from San Francisco. Five miles from Los Gatos. No 
tiresome staging. Delightful climate. Mineral water 
and table unsurpassed. Boating, swimming and fishing 
and all out-door sports. One of the best tennis courts 
on the Coast. Entire new management. 

A. S. OLNEY, Manager. 

THE GARDEN CITY SANITARIUM. 

Thoroughly Equipped with all modern appliances. X-ray. All 
forms water treatment, the finest Static Galvanic Sinusoidal and Faradlc 
Electrical apparatus. A Corps of well-trained nurses of both sexes 
skilled In all forms of treatments and manipulations Rest Cure scientlfie- 
cally carried out. * * • * A qulet.Chome-like place, beautiful scenery 
Mount Hamilton and the famous Lick Observatory in plain view; one 
block from electric cars, fifteen minutes walk from the center of the city 
Terms 810 to 820 per week, including medical attention and regular treat 
ment- 

Garden City Sanitarium, East San Jose, Cal. 



GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL. 

Felton, Santa Cruz County, Cal. 
A. J. GASS, Proprietor. 



Six miles from Santa Cruz, 
and % mile from big trees. 
Bus meets all trains. Terms 
reasonable. 



HOTEL KNICKERBOCKER 



BLITHEDALE 

Mill Valley, Cal. 



VAN NESS AVENUE, 

San Francisco. 



J. A. ROBINSON. 



CALISTOGA & CLEAR LAKE STAGE LINE 

Direct to Harbin, Anderson, Adams, Howard, Astorg, 
Glenbrook, Hoburgs and Selglers Springs. Teams and sad- 
dle horses, etc. Write 

WM. SPIERS, Calistoga. 



July 6. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



21 



THE DAY AFTER. 
The Ambulance, the Hose Cart nml 

The gTeen Police Patrol. 
Their tongues hang out. their wheels are tired, 

And they can scarcely roll. 

"The Fourth Is gone, we rest at last," 

The trio feebly say, 
"We also celebrated some 

On Independence Day." 



CAMP REVERIE 

RUN UP FOR A DAY 

r-». m, ,r-» SATURDAY AND 
RUN UP RETURN SUNDAY 
OR MONDAY 

RUN UP AND BACK 

l\KJ\V Ul ON SUNDAY 

and see for yourself. 

CAMP REVERIE 

"IN ALL CALIFORNIA NO PLACE LIKE THIS." 

Round Trip, $2.50. Take Boat at Ti- 
buron Ferry. 

H. C. Whiting, R. X. Ryan, 

Gen. Manager Gen. Pass. & Freieht Agent 

CAMP REVERIE 

ON THE 

CALIFORNIA & NORTHWESTERN R'Y. 

HARBIN SPRINGS 

The Most Accessible and Most Desirable Id Lake County. 

Contain Sulphur, Iron, Magnesia, and Arsenic. 
Open the Year Round. Hotel, Cottages and Grounds Lighted 
with Acetylene Gas. Wonderful cures of rheumatism, cunt, 
dyspepsia, catarrh, paralysis, neuralgia, dropsy, blood poison- 
ing, skin diseases, kidney, liver and stomach troubles. A Nat- 
ural Mineral or Medicated Mud Rath has just been discovered; 
nothing like it known. Don't Miss Harbin Springs During May 
and June. The most delightful months in the year. Absolutely 
free from mosquitoes. Perfect climate; no excessive heat; fin- 
est vegetable garden in the State. Perfectly equipped livery 
stable in connection with hotel. Home dairy. Popular amuse- 
ments. Two hard-finished cottageB juBt completed. ONLY SIX 
I HOURS from San Francisco. Stage daily. from Calistoga to 
Springs. Round-trip tickets at S. P, office, 88- Fine hunting and 
fishing. Rates reasonable- Long distance telephone. 
J. A. HAYS, Proprietor. 

CALIFORNIA HOT SPRINGS 

Hot springs, but not a sanitarium. Formerly Agua Caliente Springs, Sonoma 
Valley. No staging; 46 miles via C. N. Railway or S. P. R. R. Immense 
swimming tank. Splendid table. Come Sundays — try it. Round trip, 
$1.10. Telephone. Expensive improvements. $12 and $14, 

COOPER & SHEDDEN, Agua Caliente, Cal. 



GIBBS RESORT 

In the Santa Cruz Mountains 

Hotel, cabins, camp ground, Redwood groves. Fishing, shoot- 
ing. Cream, milk, poultry, and Iresh fruit in abundance. One 
of the most healthful and picturesque resorts in the mountains. 
A. W. J. GIBBS, Proprietor, 
GIBBS, 
Santa Cruz Co., Cal. 

PARK HOUSE Ben L <»"ond, Cal. 

Pleasant surroundings, beautiful scenery, good table, fish, 
ing, and fine drives. MRS. I. N. HAYES. 



K>ttTS%^£ 



HOTEL VENDOME. SAN JOSE, CAL. 

One of California's most attractive resorts. The start- 
ing point for Lick Observatory. The center of an 
orchard section of unparalleled beauty, through which 
finely graded and watered roads, for cycling and driv- 
ing, lead in every direction. The most thoroughly-kept 
and jp-to-date hotel in Central California. 

For further information call at Traveler office, 20 
Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., or address 

GEO. P. SNELL, Manager. 



Arlington Hotel 



SANTA BARBARA 



The finest summer climate in the State. Sea bathing 
every day in the year, The best green turf golf links 
in California; five minutes' street car ride from the 
hotel. Special low rates during the summer. 

E. P. DUNN, Proprietor. 



Arcadia 

CAMPUS STATION 

Santa Cruz Mountains 

Delightfully located, 
half a mile from 
Big Trees. New 
hotel newly fur- 
nished. Electric 
lighted. Hot and 
cold water. Porce- 
lain tubs. 

BATHING, FISHING, HUNTING, TENNIS, Etc. 

Address THOMAS L. BELL, Felton P. O. 

HOTEL ROWARDENNAN 

Located in the Santa Cruz Mountains. 

9 miles from Santa Cruz. Round-Trip tickets 

from San Francisco, $3.00. 

Everything first-class. Over Ten Thousand 

Dollars spent in improvements this year. 

Headquarters for parties going into the Big 

Basin. Good livery. Competent drivers. 

Write for booklet to B. DICKINSON, Lessee, 

Ben Lomond, Cal. 




HOTEL EL MONTE L ° s Gatos . Cal - 

John Nevill, Proprietor. 
American Plan. Strictly first-class. 




HOLLY OAKS 

SAUSALITO, CAL. 

Rates from $10 
per week upward. 

MRS. M. A. FARRAR, 

Proprietor. . 



a 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



July 6, 1901. 




Fourth of July week is always a decidedly off one In San 
Francisco. Every one who can manage it leaves town to 
get away from the noise and discomfort of the city on that 
day, and in many instances find both commodities in in- 
creased supply where they betake themselves. There has 
been a large exodus this week. San Rafael and Del Monte 
have attracted a large proportion of the social element, and 
house parties from all over the State, from the Colliers 
at Lakeport to the McKittricks at Bakersfleld, have been 
as numerous as there are country homes. Especially was 
this the case at that settlement of the elite, which includes 
Blingum, San Mateo, and Menlo Park, nearly all the guests 
thereabouts joining in the dance at the Blingum Clubhouse 
en Wednesday evening. However, our belles have been sadly 
disappointed that the supply of button beaux which they had 
surely counted upon for the national holiday should have 
failed them. The Iowa and Winconsin have both gone, and 
the Oregon is going, and it will be some little time till we see 
them again. The officers of the Wisconsin, which sailed last 
week, and is now in northern waters, gave a delightful little 
reception on board the vessel the day prior to departure, 
members of the Bohemian Club and their lady friends being 
the guests honored. 

The week at San Rafael has been largely devoted to 
tennis. The tournament for the championship of the State 
opened in the courts of the Hotel Rafael on Tuesday and 
lasted three days. The paper chase which was run at San 
Rafael last Saturday proved such a success there will be 
another one this afternoon. Miss Jefferys, of New York, 
was the winner of the woman's prize last week, Mr. George 
Quarre carrying off the men's trophy. 

The genial host of the Occidental Hotel, Major Hooper, is 
never more happy than when planning some pleasure for 
his guests and their friends. The army and navy seem to be 
his especial care, and the entertainment he aided in giving 
them last Friday evening was not only a novelty but a de- 
lightful success. The band and some two hundred of the 
regiment of the Forty-eighth Volunteers, just arrived from 
the Philippines, gave a serenade to General Young and his 
daughters, and the officers of the army stationed in and about 
San Francisco were there in large numbers, as well as many 
civilian friends. The large dining room was used for the 
concert hall, chairs being placed in rows for seats. A cord 
stretched across the entrance to the smaller dining room 
made the dividing line for the men and the audience. The 
band played selections in alternation with solos and choruses 
by the colored soldiers, whose singing of "Old Black Joe," 
"Tenting To-night," and "My Old Kentucky Home," were the 
gems of the vocal programme. The selections from "Tann- 
hauser" and "Maritana" by the band were loudly applauded, 
and the whole affair was most enjoyable. The rooms were 
artistically draped with the national colors. The bright 
buttons worn by the men and the light, pretty costumes of 
the ladies made a brilliant ensemble. Among the audience 
were General Young and staff, General Shatter and staff, 
Colonel Rawles, Colonel Girard, Colonel J. D. V. Middleton, 
Major Gibson, Major Hull, Captain Kimball, Dr. Edie, and 
many others. 

The sixth of August is the date set for the marriage of 
Miss Bessie Gage to Mr. William Richardson of Austin, 
Texas, which will take place at the Gage villa in Oakland. 
The fair bride-elect has selected the Misses Mabel Gage, 
Ruth Durham, Crissie Taft, Ethel Gage, Amy Scoville and 
Belle Nicholson as her attendant bridesmaids, with Miss 
Rose Nalle of Austin as maid of honor. 

The wedding of Miss Grace Loud and Mr. James O'Connell, 
whose engagement was recently announced, will be solemn- 
ized next Tuesday at the home of the bride's parents. 
Congressman and Mrs. E. F. Loud. 

Wednesday next is the wedding day of Miss Alice Chlpman 
and Mr. Chester Smith. They will leave immediately after 



the ceremony for a wedding trip around the world. The 
Davis-Burgess wedding ranks as one of the earliest of the 
month. Lieutenant L. R. Burgess arrived with his battery 
in the transport Pak-Llng last Saturday; a brother officer, 
Lieutenant Summerall (a former favorite beau in our swim), 
also arrived by the same ship. 

Miss Ida Belle Palmer and Mr. George S. Wheaton were 
guests of honor at the dinner given by Mrs. A. S. McDonald 
in Oakland last week: Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Adams, Mrs. J. M. 
Driscoll, Mr. and Mrs. I. L. Requa. Colonel and Mrs. O. F. 
Long, Mr. and Mrs. Athern Folger, and Mr. Thomas Driscoll 
were the guests invited to meet the recently engaged 
couple. 

Mr. J. C. Stubbs, who is leaving San Francisco after a 
residence here of over thirty years to become Traffic Mana- 
ger of the Southern Pacific Company in Chicago, has been 
given a good send-off by his business associates and friends 
generally, and to say he will be missed puts it mildly. Thir- 
ty-five of them united in giving Mr. Stubbs a luncheon at 
the Palace Hotel on Saturday, and on Monday evening Mr. 
R. P. Schwerln gave a dinner in his honor at the Pacific 
Union Club, which was a veritable banquet, fifty guests being 
invited to partake. 

Mrs. May Wright Sewall, who is the guest of Mrs. J. F. 
Swift, has been the recipient of many pleasant little atten- 
tions since her arrival in San Francisco. Mrs. Swift gave 
her a reception immediately upon her arrival, and has fol- 
lowed it up with several dinners at which those well known 
in the world of letters have been asked to meet Mrs. Sewall. 
Mrs. Webb Howard gave a reception in her honor at her 
home in Oakland; another hostess was Mrs. Sanborn of 
Berkeley, whose luncheon was a delightful affair, and last 
Saturday the Association of Collegiate Alumnae entertained 
her at luncheon. 

Those who have heard the rumor that Mrs. Hattie Sanger 
Pullman has become the owner by purchase of the Corbett 
place at San Mateo indulge in a little mild wonder as to why 
she should want another residence, being already so well 
supplied. She possesses handsome homes in Chicago, at 
Long Branch, and on one of the Thousand Islands, and now 
in California, should the tale be true. 

Bishop and Mrs. Moreland have taken a house on Clay 
street, and will remain in San Francisco until after the 
great convention of the Episcopal church, which will as- 
semble here in October next. General Shatter has also be- 
come a householder, having taken the old Hort residence out 
on Jackson street. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Alexander leave New York next week 
for Del Monte, where they will spend several weeks, and 
where their coming is looked forward to with pleasure. Miss 
Alice Rutherford is en route here, whence she sails for 
Japan for a visit of several months. General and Mrs. J. 
V. Houghton, who have been East visiting their daughter, 
Mrs. Bulkeley, in Connecticut, were hurriedly called home 
owing to the death of their son, Mr. Harry B. Houghton, 
which occurred last Friday. Mrs. Hugh Tevis returned 
from Japan by the steamer Doric, arriving last Saturday 
with the cremated remains of her late husband. Mr. and 
Mrs. Wilfred Chapman were passengers by the same 
steamer. 

The two recently wedded pairs, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
Bishop and Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Callahan, have returned 
from their honeymoon trips. Mr. Peter Martin has gone back 
tc the "haven where he would be" — Newport, R. I., where 
his marriage to Miss Lily Oelrichs is to be celebrated 
within the next few weeks. Mrs. Mayo Newhall and family 
expect to leave some time next week for an absence of 
several years in Europe, where her children are to be edu- 
cated. Miss Bessie Ames is visiting her sisters. Mrs. Robbins 
&nd Mrs. Wood, in Boston. 

Colonel J. L. Chamberlain, who has relieved Colonel Maus 
as Inspector General of this Department, and Mrs. Cham- 
berlain, will pass a part of the summer at the Hotel Rafael; 
the Misses Blanche and Octavia Hoge are spending the month 
of July at that pleasant hostelry; Dr. Henry Gibbons and 
Miss Marjorie Gibbons are at Deer Park Inn for a stay of 
several weeks; Mrs. H. M. A. Miller is spending the summer 
months at Blithedale; Mrs. Robert Oxnard has been visit- 
ing Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels at her home in Sonoma County; 



July 6, 190V. 



• AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Mrs K A MA'arthy anil Miss Helen Wagner are imon( 
the summer guests at Del Monte. Miss Kowenu Burns and 
Miss Mar Rets arc at Arcadia. Mrs. J. A. Stanley mul Mrs. 
Thomas Coghlll are at Rowardennan. and Judge and Mrs 
Uarber are at Napa Soda Springs. 

The Hotel Rafael Is enjoying an unusually large patronage 
this summer. Tbe climate of San Rafael and the beautiful 
sienery attract visitors from all over the country. The 
following are guests at the Hotel Rafael: Miss P. Mone. 
Miss I/)ul8e A. Slynn. Miss Nellie A. Slynn. Mr. R. J. Tobln. 
Mr. Percy Kahn. Mr. William Trowbridge. Mr. S. F. Lusk, 
Miss W. A. Craig. Miss Lola Simpson, Mr. A. Stewart and 
wife. Mr. O. H. Bain and wife. Mrs. Mortimer Davis. Mr. E. 
J. Douglas. Mr. George Bent. Mrs. Spencer Arhlin. Miss 
I. Arhlin. Mr. C. C. Stevenson. Jr.. Miss Mae Perkins, 
Mis. De Gardner, Miss Helen Dean, Mrs. R. Anderson, 
Miss Kuth Anderson, Mr. S. H. McChutock and wife, Miss G. 
S. Scovel. Mr. W. J. Woosley, Mrs. L. B. Figenbaum. Mrs. S. 
L. Naphthaly. Colonel and Mrs. Chamberlain, Mrs. C. Muir, 
Mr. I. C. Ackerman. Mr. John Martin, Mr. A. H. Babcock, 
Mr. F. s. Brown. Mr. W. B. Collier, Jr., Mr. G. F. Whitney, 
Miss Sarah Collier, Miss Dorothy Collier, Mrs. Walter S. 
Dean, Miss Mary Cooley, Mr. L. E. Van Winkle, Miss Haw- 
kins, Miss McNally, Mrs. Stanley Ponton de Arce, and Mr. 
M. Johnson. 

Mr. William Wblff and daughter, Miss Paula Wolff, have 
leturned after an absence of three months, touring France, 
Germany, Great Britain and Holland. 

The guests who registered this week at Congress Springs 
are: Miss J. L. Murphy, Miss Annette Murphy, Mr. D. V. 
hniythe. Mr. A. E. Winslow, Mr. S. Hoffman, Mrs. Hoffman. 
Mr. James T. Regan, Mrs. E. W. Harris, Miss L. J. Blumberg. 
Mr. and Mrs. F. Levy and child, Mr. H. C. Ahpel, Mr. Max J. 
Franklin, Mrs. H. Lewis, Mr. M. H. Edwards, Miss Flora Ed- 
wards, Mr. C. J. Anger and wife, Miss Anger, Miss Nelle 
Blakey. Miss Helen Dougherty, Mr. E. F. B. Mills, Mrs. 
Horton and son, Mr. Simon Newman, Mr. Charles W. Pike, 
Mr. F. Lacoste and wife, Mr. P. Chartrey and wife, Miss E. 
Chartrey. Miss A. Chartrey, Mr. W. M. Kitchen, Miss E. C. 
Kitchen, Mrs. Morrow, Miss Edith Morrow, Miss May New- 
man. Miss Gladys Courvoisier, Mrs. D. Courvoisier, Miss 
Violet V. Smith, Mr. John Pike, Mr. S. Grozelier, the Misses 
Grozelier, Mr. Amanary Mars, Mr. Henry Payot, Mr. and Mrs. 
M. Goldsmith, Mr. Edward Haven, lVj.r. Thomas A. Graham, 
Mr. W. D. Avery, Mrs. Owens, Miss Owens, Mr. D. J. North, 
Anne L. Henry, Mrs. W. C. Westlake, Mr. H. R. Rood, 
Mr. W. G. Oliver, Mr. L. A. Spitzer, Mr. L. H. Knochre, Mr. 
W. C. Perren, Mr. and Mrs. E. Lion, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. 
Hart, Mr. and Mrs. C. Becker, Mr. Harry Morris and wife, 
Mr. L. Hart, Miss E. Hart, Miss Hart, Miss Elsie Levy, Mr. 
John Crothers, Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Howland, Mr. and Mrs. 
G. I. Cochran, Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Bachelder, Mr. R. M. Batch- 
elder, Mr. J. D. Norris, Mr. S. T. Corren, Mr._S. K. Long, and 
wife, Mr. James Boyd and wife, Mr. John Kirby, Anita Levy. 

The commencement exercises of the graduating classes of 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons were held at Metro- 
politan Tem$>le on Wednesday evening, July 3d. There were 
thirty-eight graduates in the medical class, forty-five in the 
dental, and seventeen in the pharmaceutical. A very inter- 
esting programme was rendered. 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Shortridge have taken the Gregory 
cottage at Sausalito for the summer. Mr. Shortridge de- 
livered the Fourth of July oration at Marysville. 

The general agents of the Eastern railway lines paid 
a handsome tribute to Mr. J. C. Stubbs Saturday by an elab- 
orate luncheon given in the banquet room of the Palace 
Hotel. The affair was in the way of a reunion among old 
friends and business associates and was as informal as it 
was delightful. 

The weather has been ideal at Del Monte lately, making 
bathing a delight. San Francisco society is largely repre- 
sented, and there is a large number of Easterners enjoying 
the many attractions of the place. Interest is increasing 
day by day in the amateur sports to be held at Del Monte 
during the week beginning August 19th. The men's amateur 
golf competition for the Del Monte cup will be held on the 
first day, and promises to be one of the best contests. The 
ladies are looking forward to winning many boxes of gloves 
on the result. The one and one-half mile hurdle race, to be 



bold on the lust day t.,f tin- nivel for I cub pi lie will be ex- 
i lling. and. from all reports, will proddC* one or two sur- 
prises. The polo tournaments will be held during tha Aral 
lour days, and some brilliant work Is looked for. 



THE DRUDGE AND THE DREAMER. 



The drudge he scoffs at the Dreamer's dream: 
How valueless his life!" he deems, 

As he peers through the attic's dusky chink, 
"Good Lord! What a waste of pen and ink!" 

"His head is empty as sucked eggs — 
No wine in his cup except the dregs! 

"While I make the wheels of the world go round. 
And I'll work and work 'till I'm under ground!" 
The Dreamer gazes with dreary eyes: 
"How hard to live that poor man tries! 

Toils like an ox, and just to feel 
He's only a cog in Labor's wheel! 

"While / move the world to laughter or tears, 
To know my joys, or feel my fears!" 

But the World rushes by with a wink and a leer — 
iney are both just equal parts of its gear. 
April 2, 1901. E. F. L. 



A Ski.i of Beauty is a Joy Forever. 

FELIX OOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM OR MAGICAL BEAUTIF1ER. 

Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, 
Moth Patches, Rash and Skin Dis- 
eases, and every blemish on beauts', 
and defies detection. It has stood the 
test of 53 years and is so harmless we 
taste it to be sure it is properly made. 
Accept no counterfeit of similar name. 
Dr. L. A.Payresaid to a lady of the 
haut-ton (a patient): "As you ladies 
will use them. I recommend 'Gour- 
aud's Cream' as the least harmful of 
all the skin preparations." For sale 
by all drujrgrists and Fancy-Broods 
Dealers in the United States, Canadas 
and Europe. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 

37 Great Jones street, N. Y. 




IRVING INSTITUTE 



Boarding and day school for girls . 2120 California street, San 
Francisoo. Accredited to the Universities. The next session 
will begin August 5 For illustrated catalogue address the 
principal, 

REV. EDWARD B. CHURCH, A. M. 



MRS. M. E. PERLEY 

KERAM1C STUDIO 

Instructions In 

Keramlc Roman Gold, $1.00 per box. 
Agent for Revelation Kiln. 



TELEPHONE GKANT 43 



Colors and enamels for sate. 
China fired dally. 



CHINA PAINTING 

209 A POST ST.. S. F. 



SEND 10 CENTS FOR 

KORN 
PATENT 
SOFT HAT 
CREASE 
HOLDER 

Will retain shape and 
crease In any soft hat. 

KAHN THE HATTER, 726 Market St., S. F.. Cal. 
i^»»»»»».| < 4. ^< .. » » <nl . »4 -- >< ' <"l '4'4i<'4-»4'»* <"l '-fr- l '' » '»<''»<' » 4 




24 



8AN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



July 6, 1901. 



BANKING. 



London and San Francisco Bank, Limited 

424 CALIFORNIA STREET. 
HEAD OFFICE— "I Lombard street, London. 

Capital Authorized. 82,500,000. Capital Paid Up. 81.400.000. 

Directors— Henry Goschen, Chairman. London; Charles Edward Brether- 
ton, London; Christian de Guigne, San Francisco; Charles Hemery. 
London; John L. Howard, San FranciBco; Bendix Koppel. London; Nor- 
man D. Rideout. San Francisco; Arthur Scrivener, London. 
Inspector of Branches, Gustav Friederich. 
Aeents in New York, Messrs. J. P. Morgan & Co. 
BRANCHES; Portland, Oregon ; Tacoma. Wash., Seattle. Wash- 
Letters of credit issued available for travelers and the purchase of mer- 
chandise in any city of the world. Deal in foreign and domestic excha nee 
Accounts of country banks received. Terms on application. 

W. Mackintosh. Manager 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With which is amalgamated The Bank of British Columbia 

HEAD OFFICE— Toronto. 

Paid Up Capital. 88,000,000. Reserve Fund, 82.000,000. 

Aggregate Resources over 865,000,000. 

Hon. Geo- A- Cox. President; B- E. Walker. General Manager. 

♦J. H.Plummer, Asst. General Manager- 

LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St., E. C, S. Cameron Alexander, Manage 

NEW YORK OFFICE— l6_Exchange Place. Alex. Laird and Wm- Gray. 

Agents. 
ONTARIO: 44 BRANCHES- 

Quebec: Montreal; Manitoba: Winnipeg; Ynkon District 
Dawson. White Horse; British Columbia: Atlln. Cranbrook, Fernie 
Greenwood. Kamloops, Nanalmo, Nelson, New Westminster. Rossland 
Sandon. Vancouver, Victoria- In the United States— New York, N. Y. San 
Fiancisco. Cal- Seattle, Wash- Portland, Ore- Skagway, Alaska- 
Bankers in Loudon— The Bank of Scotland; Messrs- Smith. Payne & Smiths: 
Bankers In New York— The American Exchange National Bank. 
Agents in Chicago— The Northern Trust Company. Agents in New Orleans ■ 
— The Commercial National Bank. 

San Francisoo Office: Walter Powell, Manager. A. Kalns, Asst. Manager 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Cob. Sansomk and Stjttkb Sts. 

Subscribed Capital 82,500.000 Pald-Up Capital. 82.000.000 

Reserve Fund. 81.000.000 

HEAD OFFICE— 40 Threadneedle street, London, E. C. 

AGENTS: New York— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank. 
Limited. No. 10 Wall street. N. Y.; Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 17 
Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits Issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM C. ALTSCHUL, Managers. 
R, ALTSCHUL. Cashier. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Sansome and Pine Sts., San Francisco 
Jab. K. Wilson, President 
Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashier 

CAPITAL. 8500.000 
SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS, 8130.000. 
DDiECTORS-- James K. Wilson. Wui. J. Dutton, Wm. Phjrce Johnson. Geo 
A, Pope, H. E. Huntington, Henry Pierce. C. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS : New York—Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank; 
Chemical National Bank, Boston—National Bank of the Commonwealth 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co.: Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis 
—The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London--* 
Brown. Shipley & Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co. 

Germania Trust Company of San Francisco 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital, 81,000.000 Pald-Up Capital and Reserve. 8390,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian, or Trustee. 

Check Accounts of individuals, firms, and corporations solicited. 

Legal Depository for money in Probate Court proceedings. Interest 
PAID ON TRUST DEPOSITS AND SAVINGS. INVESTMENTS carefully selected 
for our clients. 

Officers— F. Kronenberg, President; W- A- Frederick, vice-president; H. 
Brunner, Cashier 

Board of Directors— F. Kronenberg. W. A- Frederick, Fred A- Kuhls, E 
A. Denlcke, A- G. Wieland, Fred Woerner. J. C. Rued, Fred O. Slebe 
John Rapp. 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Coe, PrNE AND Sansome Sts. 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars. London. E. C. 

Capital Authorized J6.000.000 Paid TJp $1,600,000 

Subscribed 3.000.000 Reserve Fund... 700,000 

Agents at New York— J. <fe W. Sellgman & Co.. 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and isBues letters of credit available throughout the world 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange and bullion 

ION. STELNTTART, P. N. LLLLENTHAL. Managers. 



Wm. Pierce Johnson. Vice-President 
F. W. Wolfe. Assistant Cashier 



Bank of California, San Francisco 

Capital. 12.000.000. 
Surplus and Undivided ProfltB, April 1, 1901, $3,611,096.80. 

WILLIAM ALVORD .President I I. F. MOULTON Ass't CaBhier 

CHARLES R. BISHOP Vlce-Pres't SAM H. DANLEL8.....As8't Cashier 

THOMAS BROWN Cashier I ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary 

CORRESPONDENTS 

New York— Messrs. Laldlaw & Co. ; the Bank of New York. N. B. A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston — National Shawmut 
Bank. Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank: First National Bank. 
Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louis— Boatmen's Bank. 
Virginia City. Nev. — Agency of The Bank of California. London— Messrs 
N. M. Rothschild & Sons. Paris— Messrs. de Rothschild Freres. Berlin- 
Direction der Dlsconto Oesellschaft. China. Japan, and East Indies— Char- 
tered Bank of India. Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand— The 
Union Bank of Australia, Ltd.. and Bank of New Zealand. 

Letters of credit Issued available In all parts of the world. 

Wells Fargo X Co. Bank 

N. E. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 
JOHN J. VALENTINE. President H. WADSWORTH, Cashier 

HOMER S. KING. Manager F. L. IJPMAN. Assistant Cashier 

H. L. MILLER. Second Assistant Cashier. 

Capital. Surplus and Undivided Profits Dec. 31, 1900 18.620,223.88 

Branches— New York City. H. B. Parsons. Cashier: Salt Lake City. J. E. 
Dooly, Cashier: Portland, Or., R, Lea Barnes, Cashier. 
DIRECTORS— John J. Valentine. Andrew Chrlsteson. Oliver Eldrldge. 
Henry E. Huntington. Homer S. King, George E. Gray. John J. McCook 
John Bermlngham, Dudley Evans. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 12.290.159.05 

Capital actually paid up in Cash 1.000.000 00 

Deposits June 29. 1901 .29,886.288.11 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President, B. A. Beoker: First Vice-President 
Daniel Meyer: Second Vice-President. H. Horstman: Cashier. A. H. R 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier. William Herrmann: Secretary, George Tourny 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller: General Attorney. W. S. Goodfellow. 

Ign. StHnhart, E. Rohte H. B. Russ. N Ohlandt. John Lloyd, and I. N 
Walter. 

/Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,000,000. Paid Up Capital $800,000 

James D. Phelan. President 8. G. Mdbpht. Vice-President 

George A. Story, Cashier John A. Hooper, Vice-President 

C. B. Hobson, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan. S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, James 
Morntt. Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Chas. S. Neal. James M. 
McDonald. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo & Co.. or Exchange on 
city banks. When opening accounts send signature. 



Security Savings Bank 



Interest paid on deposits. 



222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 
Loans made. 
DIRECTORS. 



William Alvord 
William Babcock 
Adam Grant 



8. L. Abbot. Jr. 
O. D. Baldwin 
W. S. Jones 



H.H.Hewlett 
E. J. McCutchaa 
R. H, Pease 



San Francisco Savings Union 



532 CALIFORNIA STREET, S. F. 



Reserve Fund $223 451 

Contingent Fund 464.847 

W. C. B. DeFREMERY. Vice-President 
R. M. WELCH. Assistant Cashier 



Deposits Jan 1. 1901... $27,881,798 
Paid-up Capital 1,000.000 

E. B. POND. President 
LOVELL WHITE. Cashier 

Directors — Henry F. Allen. Thomas Magee. W. O. B. de Fremery, C. O 
G. Miller. Robert Watt, George C. Boardman. Daniel E. Martin. Jacob 
Barth. E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms and farming 
lands in the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made in checks payable 
In San Francisco. Post Office, or Wells Fargo &. Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 3 p. m.. and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only, 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

Continental Building X Loan Association 

Established In 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 
Subscribed Capltal..$12,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund...$250.000 
Pald-in-Capltal 2,000.000 Monthly Income, over 100,000 

Its Purpose is to help its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on Improved property, the members giving first liens on their real estate as 
Becurity. 

To help Its Stockholders to earn 8 to 12 per cent, per annum on their stock 
and allow them to open deposit accounts bearing Interest at the rate of 5 
per cent, per annum. 

Home Office — 222 Sansome St.. San Francisco. Cal. 

Wm. Cobbin. General Manager 

Crocker-Woolworth National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Corner Mabket. Montgomery and Post Sts. 

Pald-up-CapllBl $1,000 000 

Wm. H. Crocker. President Geo. W. Kline. Cashier 

O. E. Green. Vice-President W. Gregg. Jr.. Assistant Cn»hi e r 

Directors— W. H. Crocker. E. B Pond. George Crocker. O. E. Greon. GW. 
Kline. Henry J. Orooker. G. W. Soot'. 



July 6. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




ABSCHIED. 
.Roiuuuond Marriott WateoiO 
The mountain tops are wrapped in rain. 
And all the ling's fire amethyst 
Is drowned in drifts of white, white mist. 
Our hour Is come to part again. 

By the pale window waves the pine 

Its measured farewells, great and slow; 
Silently as the falling snow- 
Floats the gold leafage of the vine. 

O. very lonely is my way. 

Morn lonely than your dwelling here; 

Which is the sharper grief, My Dear, 
For me to go? . . . .for you to stay? 

That you must stay ... that I must go. 

O vast estrangement bleak and new; 
Whate'er the years may bring to you 
I shall not heed, I shall not know. 

For the high hill-tops shall touch the plain, 
Sun, moon, and stars be overthrown, 
And the salt seas be turned to stone 

Before we two may meet again. 



THEOSOPHICAL REFLECTIONS. 

IT. Shelley Sutton, in Tne Bohemian) 

Ah, no, not here! Perhaps it might have been 

In some far sphere — some cosmos that is lost — 
Where hearts are pure, unconscious of all sin, 

And knew not yet the pain tnat sin would cost — 
Some distant orb — some lone, mysterious star 

Where no Iago could disturb the breast — 
Where hell was not, tho' heaven was not far, 

And Lucifer was happy with the blest! — 
Where peace was found and heaven was not bought; 

Where joy was true and endless was its song; 
Where souls were pure, contented with their lot, 

And love was right and passion was not wrong! — 
Perhaps — ah, yes! in that Utopian sphere 

I know full well that we have sometime met, 
For there is something — something that is dear 

Which floods my soul with memory; and yet — 
Yes, somewhere, love, sometime — I know not when, 

But in the mists of far, forgotten years 
We met and loved ; we parted, and since then 

My soul is steeped in love's repentant tears. 



THE SHADOWING PAST. 

(Arthur Strlneer, in Ainslee's Magazine ) 
He followed me with hound-like tread, 

He dogged me night and day. 
Each time I dreamed that he was dead 
There at my door he lay. 

"Though once I harbored this old Hound, 
By what right does he stay?" 

So him at last I caught and bound, 
And rode long miles away. 

Dark paths with many a twist I took, 
Strange woods with twilight dim; 

Through by-ways thick with turn and crook 
Alone I carried him. 

His last cries in a tarn I drowned, 
Ana hurried home once more. 

Lo, waiting there, my old gaunt Hound 
Stood whining at the door! 



A FOREST LITANY. 

(Amelia K. Wing, in Outine.) 

The solemn ritual of the leafy wood, 

The swaying branches moaning high in air, 

The murmur of the brook in playful mood, 
Are but the soul's deep litany of prayer. 



SHAKE INTO YOUR SHOES 

Allen'* Font-Eiiftc. * powder- It cure* painful, marline, nrrvnn- lc*H 
mill Irurrowlns nnli*. rim) ln«t*oUy tnkr« thr Ming oul of oonw asd trair 
Ions* lt> the BTMt*Ml comfort dltoovtr? ■■* tht *ae. Allan*! i'i»>i-Etu»e 
iimkc* tight "T n*W ■•hoc* loci en»y. Il In n certain curt- f-.r •« eating, oftl- 
lonfl and ho . tired, rthtnoj fti-t Try It l"-i<iy. Bold by nil druggist** and 
■hoefttorra. By mull t-.r Hk>. in ntntiipa- Trlni pnrkmce PRKK. AddroM, 
Allen 3. Oltnited. I*e Roy. N. Y. 




FELIX'S ROTISSERIE. 

Felix Gouailnardou, proprietor, (formerly with 

Jack's Rotisserie), 537 California street, below 

Kearny. Private rooms for families and banquets 

Telephone Black 2906 



Gray Bros. 



228 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 
205 New High Street, Los Angeles*. 

Concrete and artificial 
stone work. 



Murphy, Grant & Co., 



Agents for the 



(Formerly in Mills Building 



BALTIMORE 

MT. VERN0N-W00DBERRY COTTON DUCK CO. 

Importers of Staple and Fancy Dry Goods. Manufacturers of furnishing 
goods. Patentees and sole manufacturers of The "Never-RIp" Overall. 
The best in the world. 

Full Line of Spring Goods 

J. R. SMITH 
Tailoring Co., 

310 Bush St., under Russ House, S. P. 

Joseph Gillott's Steel Pens, t ™ awa1 Mgo.i893 

Gold Medals Paris, 1878-1809. These pens are " the 
beat in the world." Sole agent for the United StateB 
Mb. Henry Hob, 91 John street. New York. 
Sold by all stationery 

A. B. TREADWELL Attorney-at-Law 

(Formerly Judge Police Court No. i) 
HAS RESUMED PRACTICE at 633 Kearny St., cor. Sacramento St. 
Al legal business attendedto promptly. 

Samuel M. Shortridge, Atty-at-Law 

Crocker Building, San Francisco. 



THE CHAMPAGNES OF 

Moet& 
Cfrccndon 

White Seal and Brut Imperial 

now being marketed are of the celebrated vintage of 1893. 

Messieurs. Moet & Chandonare the most extensive vineyard pro- 
prietors in the world and their Champagnes are having a larger sale 
and are of a quality far superior to any other brand, being used al- 
most exclusively at all ultra-fashionable functions, among others at 
the Admiral Dewey Collation, Vanderbilt, Astor, Bradley-Martin, 
Belmont, and Stuy vesant Fish affairs.— New York Wine Circular. 

WILLIAM WOLFF & CO., 
Pacific Coast Agents. Market Street, S. F. 



26 



•AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 6, 1901. 



MURDERED BY PROXY. 

It was exactly six o'clock in the even- 
ing when I rode into the station-yard 
at Bastport. I heard the silvery chimes 
sounding from the tower of the great 
church in the market place as I dis- 
mounted from my bicycle. The discom- 
forts of the afternoon were now over, 
and therefore might be forgotten; what 
was really important was to procure 
a good meal, rest my rather weary 
limbs for an hour or two, and then 
set out on my journey along the coast 
once more. 

I wheeled my bicycle into the station 
and made for the left-luggage office. 
As the attendant wrote out my ticket 
I observed that market day seemed to 
cause much business in Eastport. He 
shook his head with a gesture of some- 
thing like impatience. 
Nay," he said, "it's not that, sir. 
It's this Great American Circus that's 
come into the town for a few days. 
*olks is coming in from all sides to 
see it — there'll be thousands in the town 
to-night." 

He gave me the ticket for the machine 
and I walked out on to the platform, 
having to push my way through a little 
group of men congregated at the door 
of the shed. Then my thoughts turned 
to food and drink. I remembered a 
curious, old-fashioned hostelry in the 
heart of the town where you could get 
a grilled steak that was worth eating. 
I said to myself that I would go there; 
it would be quiet and peaceable, for it 
was out of the way and hidden in a 
labyrinth of streets. But, hrst of all, 
I would have a drink in the station re- 
freshment room, for I was very thirsty; 
there had been a hot sun all day, and 
the roads were thick with dust that 
June. 

The refreshment room, like all the 
rest of the purlieus of the station, was 
crowded with people, and it was only 
after some difficulty that I contrived 
to approach the bar and make my 
wishes known .0 one of the much-tried 
young women behind it. Most of my 
companions were people from the 
country, and had left their usual 
haunts in order to visit the Great Am- 
erican Circus. Some of them, judging 
from their conversation, had attended 
the afternoon performance and were 
now going home; others were looking 
forward with expectancy to the evening 
exhibition, some notion of the grandeur 
of which they derived from the accounts 
of those whose eyes had already gazed 
on clown and equestrienne. 

My attention was soon diverted from 
these simple folk by two men, who, like 
myself, stood" a little apart from the 
crowd around the bar. When I first 
caught sight of them their eyes were 
fixed upon me. but as I looked at them 
their faces became, or seemed to be- 
come, utterly indifferent, and immedi- 
ately afterwards I set down my empty 



nsn 


In Principle end 
Practice the 


Ew 


PRESIDENT 


SMI 


SUSPENDER 


lhM 


Lb Bupcrior to nny suspender 
made. Every pair guaranteed. 
The genuine has "President" on 
tlie tuu-kles. Trtnimmps^nn not 
ruflti 50e. everywhere, or byiuuil. 


pAfl -ka^M 


0. A. EDGAUTON MFG. CO. 




Box ' I U Shirley, Maes. 



Pabst beer 

is always pure 



glass and started out at a brisk pace 
for the hostelry where I proposed to 
make my evening meal. 

The Olde Dun Cowe in Eastport is 
one of those quaint, ancient Tudor 
houses which have somehow or other 
managed to escape the ravages and 
despoliations of time. Ere I had satis- 
fieu my hunger in the grill-room of the 
Olde Dun Cowe I chanced to look up, 
and found myself once more encounter- 
ing the glances of the two men whom 
I had seen about an hour previously 
in the refreshment room at the rail- 
way station. It was only for a second 
that our glances met; but they did 
meet, and I did not like to realize that 
there was some meaning in both theirs 
and mine. 

There was a smoking room opposite 
the open door of the grill room, and its 
door was also open. The two men en- 
tered the smoking room and sat down, 
with every appearance — I mean genuine 
appearance — of innocent intent. I 
watched them as I ate; they never once 
turned their eyes in my direction. They 
ordered drink — some sort of foreign 
stuff in tiny glasses — and lighted long, 
thin cigars, and they chatted and talked 
and laughed gaily, one with the other, 
as if they were old friends who had 
not met for years. It was easy to see 
they were foreigners by their gesticu- 
lations, and I quickly decided that they 
were sailors — mates, stewards, or the 
sort — ashore for the evening. 

I walked into the little smoking room 
when I had finished my meal, and drew 
out my cigarette case. The room was 
small. One of the two men politely 
struck a match and held it out to me. 
I took it, thanked him, and lighted my 
cigarette. I caught another glance 
from both men such as I had seen, or 
fancied I had seen, at the station, and 
felt rather puzzled. Surely there was 
nothing about me that attracted atten- 
tion? I looked at myself in the mirror. 
No. my tie was quite straight and my 
face was clean, and my hair was fairly 
decent. Why should two strangers re- 
gard me with any particular Interest? 

I fell into a brown study over my 
cigarette. I had ridden a long way 
that day. and had still a long way to ride 
during the June night. It was my whim, 
that ride by night — I might just as eas- 
ily have stayed in Eastport all night, 
and gone forward along the coast next 
morning. But I wanted the night ride, 
and now. as I sat there smoking, I began 
to think about it and the road. I pulled 
out my map and began to estimate the 
mileage which I must yet traverse. The 
road was straight enough — it all lay 
along the coast. 

When I folded ray map and looked 
up again the eyes of the elder of the 



two men were fixed on the solitary trin- 
ket appended to my watch chain — a 
curious oval medal of pure gold, which I 
found in Italy, lying by the roadside 
some years ago. It was absolutely 
plain, save for a device, which is stamp- 
ed, rather than engraved, on the ob- 
verse, and which I have always taken 
to be a dagger having a cord loosely 
twisted about handle and blade. 

"It is ver' dustee to-day?" he said, in- 
terrogatively, and with perfect polite- 
ness. 

"Very dusty, indeed," I replied. "A 
shower of rain or two would do the 
roads a lot of good." 

"Ah — just so," he said, in tuat curious 
jerky fashion peculiar to foreigners 
who are Imperfectly acquainted with 
our language. "Bot the roads in these 
parts of der country — what you call the 
coast, eh? — they are ver' bad for the 
cycling — ver' loose, eh?" 

"Oh, I have done about sixty miles, 
I suppose," I replied. "Not a big ride, 
you know. I am going forward in an 
hour or so." 

The man lifted his hands. 

"You have seexty miles alretty done 
and you will go forward! Mein Gott!" 
he exclaimed. "It is great feat if I ac- 
complish der twenty miles in a half- 
holiday egscursion. Seexty mile! — but 
you vill not much further dravel, hein?" 

"Oh, not much — just along the coast 
to Stormborough." 

"To Stormborough! Bot that is five- 
und-dventy mile. Ach Gott! — what en- 
durance der young folk possess in dese 
days!" 

"It's a good road?" I inquired. "Do 
you know it?" 

"I haf dreeven along it," he answered. 
"Nice straight road too — der sea lies 
alongside: bot you cannot the sea ad- 
mire at night, eh?" 

"No, I suppose not," I said. I rose 
to my feet, lighted another cigarette, 
and pulled out my watch. I saw the 
eyes of both men fasten themselves on 
the gold medal. 

"Dat was a bretty drinket you haf 



"A Genuine Old Brandy made front Wine. 

— Medical Prut {London), Aug. 1899 

MARTELL'S 
THREE STAR 
RRANOY 

AT ALL RESORTS AND RESTAURANTS 

WILLIAM WOLFF & CO., san francisco 
Pacific Coast Acents 



July 6. 1M>1. 



•AN FRANCISCO NEWI LETTER. 



Iter*.'' Mid the older man There ni 
a look In his eye* which I did not like. 
I drew myself llp and favored him with 
a chilling glance, then said "Good- 
night" In my most distant fashion, and 
walked out of the Inn. I noticed that 
both men seemed to shrink away as 
I drew myself up in reproof of their 
inqulsitlveness. and I saw a gleam of 
what I at the time took to be covetous- 
ness came into their eyes. 

I strolled slowly up to the station, 
amusing myself by watching the groups 

which crowded the principal Bl 
I was in no hurry, and I lingered here 
and there Interested In listening to the 
fragments of conversation which 
reached me as the heterogenous mass 
which is always found in the streets of 
a seaport town swayed hither and 
thither. When I reached the station it 
was nearly ten o'clock, and that hour 
had struck when I rescued my machine 
from the storage room and had lighted 
ray lamp. In a few minutes more I 
was riding slowly along the road toward 
Storm borough. 

As I left the lights of Eastport behind 
me another cyclist came alongside and 
hailed me with a cheery "Good-night." 
I replied to his greeting, and then, just 
to make sure, called out: "This right 
for Stormborough?" He slackened 
speed and I drew up to him. "Yes," he 
answered. "It's all right, but you're not 
going there to-night, are you?" 

"Certainly, I intend to do so," I ans- 
wered. "It's only twenty-five miles, is 
it?" 

He laughed — poor fellow! — and slack- 
ened his pace again. 

"Well. look here," he said, " I'll give 
you a tip. The road is straight enough 
from here to Stormborough, but there's 
a very bad bit about three miles further 
on, which spreads over two miles of 
unridable road. If you'll ride with me 
as far as where the road forks I'll show 
you another way." 

"Thanks very much," I answered; "I 
shall be glad to accept your offer. I 
don't like walking over stones — I'd far 
rather ride a few miles round than be 
obliged to dismount for two miles' walk- 
ing." 

We rode on, side by side, through the 
night. It was as dark as a June 
night ever is — a vague, impalpable dusk, 
somewhat increased by heavy clouds 
which seemed to presage thunder. I 
discovered that my chance companion 
was a young farmer living in a village 
on the sea-coast, and that he had rid- 
den into Eastport to see the afternoon 
show of the Great American Circus, and 
had remained rather late. We chatted 
cheerfully for the next three miles, and 
then he suddenly stopped and dismount- 
ed. I followed his example. 

The light of our lamps showed me 
that we were standing at the point of 
a V-shaped piece of grass, on either side 
of which stretched away the road; that 
on the right seeming to disappear into 
the darkness much more speedily than 
that on the left. 

"There," said my companion, point- 
ing to the road on the right, "that's 
the proper road, the coast road, but 
from about half a mile from here it's 
covered with stones until Holmshaw 
Bank's reached. Now, if you take this 
road to the left, and follow it without 
turning left or right, it'll take you round 
country on the level to the top of Holm- 
shaw Bank, and you can ride every yard 
though it is a bit out of the way like." 
I thanked him. We said good-night 
and mounted our machines, and he went 
oft to the right and I to the left. 
But this is what happened, and I knew 






SAUCE 

r '9mai and (j env j ine worc«»'« r * 

Ladies.at luncheon parties and at all home- 
meals. will find a delicacy of flavor in all 
dishes savored with this sauce -for soups 
fish, meats, gravy, game, salads etc. 



k8FMR£ Or IIIIY4T10NS. 



Signature 

onevervbewte 






John Dunoa/U ^c»\3 
Aqenli-Mewlbrk 



nothing of it until the next day. when 
the whole country rang with the news. 
His body was found next morning at 
that part of the road where it was nec- 
essary for a eyelist to dismount. It was 
evident that he had been assailed as 
lie stepped from his bicycle: it was also 
evident that the murderous work which 
had been done upon bim had been done 
quickly and surely. When he was found 
he was lying in the midst of the high- 
way, face downwards, with his bicy- 
cle at his side, and the people who dis- 
covered him fancied that he had had an 
accident. But when they came near 
they saw that a stiletto was fixed firmly 
in his heart, having been driven there, 
as it seemed, with one fierce blow from 
behind, and around its handle and blade 
there was twined and knotted, in curi- 
ous fashion a strand of scarf cord. 

From that day to this I have taken 
good care to abstain from wearing the 
gold medal with its strange emblem, 
and have, indeed, been at such pains to 
keep it out of sight that not even my 
wife knows where it is hidden away — 
under strict lock and key. — J. S. Flet- 
cher, in Vanity Fair. 



"I see that one of the newly ap- 
pointed patrolmen made an arrest with- 
in twenty minutes after he assumed his 
duties." said the observant citizen to 
the experienced policeman. "That's 
nothing." smiled the latter. "I went to 
sleep while my commission was being 
handed to me." — Baltimore American. 



Owner of Summer Hotel — Just what 
do you mean by modern accessories? 

Prospective Lessee — Well, for In- 
stance, an electric attachment for all 
the outside doors, so that a man con't 
leave with a dollar in his pocket without 
ringing an alarm bell in the office. 



Ranter — We're getting up an amateur 
theatrical society, and we're looking for 
a good motto; something appropriate, 
you know. Banter — What's the matter 
with "Think twice before you act?" — 
Philadelphia Press. 



The retort of a little boy to an attor- 
ney in a justice's court not long ago 
created some amusement. The lad, be- 
ing on the stand as a witness, was 
questioned concerning a certain dime 
novel, alleged to have ueen stolen. 

"What was pictured on the cover?" 
asked the attorney. 

"Two Indians," was the reply. 

"What were the Indians doing?" 

"I didn't ask 'em," answered the boy. 
— Green Bag. 



"I think that education might put an 
end to war." 

"How?" 

"Well, if the weaker parties were edu- 
cated to see that it is better to give 
in than to get whipped." 



There's one good thing about an auto- 
mobile." 

"What's that?" 

"It doesn't try to run up to every 
watering-fountain it comes to." 



"1 am Elijah," says Dr. Dowie. 

One difference that suggests itself 
is that, whereas Elijah was fed by the 
ravens, Dowie is fed by the gulls. 



Client — That little house you sent me 
to see is in a most scandalous condition. 
It is so damp that moss positively 
grows on the walls. House Agent — 
Well, isn't moss good enough for you? 
What do you expect at the rent — or- 
chids? — Exchange. 



"Cool play.er. Great presence of 
mind!" 

"That's right. He never forgets that 
the umpire can fine him ten dollars." 



Timid Lady — Are people ever lost in 
this river? Boatman — No, ma'am, we 



'Overland' 
Monthly 

.•Skrv. Frsvrv.ci.rc-o 

arv illustrated 
nva^az i rve °s «»» 
wevt.orve dol- 
lar per yeao* 

-/"e.n\.ple c ~ 



Overland^ 

MONTHLY 1 

-^A.M FRANCI/CO 

6pe/- irvto W\o\isoj\dsi 
°f Kon\e/- tfW Ez^rt- * 
ert\ rrvskdiazi rvey ' 

*■ i\ever erVter 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



July 6, 1901. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC CO.--PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trains leave and are due to arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 
[Main Line. Foot of Market St.] 



Chicago |N LESS THAN 3 Days 



leave] 



Fkom June 16, 1901 



[ ARRIVE 



CREEK ROUTE FERRY 



7:00 A Benlcla, Suisun, Elm Ira, VacaviUe. Rumsey, and Sacramento 6:25 P 
7-30 A Martinez, San Ramon, Valleio, Napa, Callstoea, Santa Rosa... 6:25 p 

8:00 a Davis; Woodland, KnithtsLandlne. Marysville, Orovllle 7:55 p 

8:00 a Atlantic Express, Oedenand East 12: -5 p 

fi:00A Niles. Lathrop, Stocfcton y?k T 

8:00 a Niles, Mendota, Hanford. Visalla, Portervllle 4:i>;> p 

8:30 a Shasta Express— Davis. Williams, (for Bartlett Sprlncs). Wil- 
lows, Red Bluff. Portland 7:55 P 

8:30 A San Jose. Livermore. Stockton. lone. Sacramento. Placerville. 

Marysville. Chico. Red Bluff. *:25 p 

8:30 a Oakdale. Chinese (Yosemite). Sonora, Carters , ■ 4-20P 

9 00 A Hay wards, Nlles, and way stations 11 :55 A 

9:00 A Vallejo 12:25 P 

9:00 A Los Angeles Express— Martinez. Tracy, Lathrop. Stockton. 

Merced. Fresno, and Los Antseles 7:25 p 

9:30 a Vallejo. Martinez, and way stations 7:55 p 

10:00 a The Overland Limited— Ocden, Denver, Omaha, Chicago 6:55 p 

tl:00p Sacramento River Steamers T5:00 a 

3:30 p Haywards. Niles. and way stations 7:55 P 

4rfK) p Benlcla, Winters, Sacramento. Woodland, Knights Landing. 

Marysville, Oroville W^ A 

4:00 p Martinez. San Ramon, Vallejo. Napa. Calistoga, Santa Rosa 9:25 A 

4:00 p Nlles. Livermore. Stockton, Lodi 12:25 p 

4:30p Haywards. Nlles, San Jose. Livermore TS:55 a 

4:30 p Port Costa. Tracy, Lathrop, Stockton 10:25 a 

5:00 p The Owl Limited— Fresno. Tulare. Bakersfield. Saugus for 

Santa Barbara, Los Angeles 8:55 A 

5:00 p Martinez, Antloch, Stockton, Merced, Fresno 12:25 r 

5:00 P Yosemite 12 25 p 

5:30 p New Orleans Express— Mendota, Fresno, Bakersfield, Los 

Angeles, Deming, El Paso. New Orleans, and East 7:55 A 

6:0Op Haywards. Nlles, andSanJose 7:55 A 

T6:00p Vallejo 11:25 A 

6:00 p Oriental Mall— Oeden. Cheyenne. Omaha, Chicago 12:25 p 

6:00 p Oriental Mail— Ogden, Denver, St. Louis. Chicago 4:25 P 

7:00 p Oregon and California Express— Sacramento, Marysville, Red- 
ding. Portland, Puget Pound, and East 8:55 A 

8:05p San Pablo, Port Costa. Martinez, and way stations 11:25a 

t8:05 p Valleio 7:55 p 

Coast Division (Narrow Gause). (Foot of Market St.) 

17;45a Santa Cruz Excursion to Santa Cruz and principal way sta- 
tions t*:05p 

8:15 A Newark, Centerville, San Jose, Felton. Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz, and way station* 5:50 p 

t2:15 P Newark. Centerville. San Jose, New Alraaden, Felton. Boul- 
der Creek. Santa Cruz, and principal way stations 10:50 A 

4:15p Newark, 9an Jose, Los Gatos t8:50 A 

C4:15 P Glenwood. Boulder Creek. Santa Cruz., ?3:50a 



From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— f7:15, 9:00. and 11 :00 
A.M. 1:00, 3:00. 5U5, P.M. 

From Oaklanp — Foot of Broadway.— f6:00. J8:00, t8:05. 10:00 A. U. 12:00, 

2:00, 4:00 p. m. 

Coast Division (Broad Gauge). (Third and Townsend streets.) 

6:10 A San Jose and way stations 6:30 P 

t7:00 A San Jose and way stations 1 :30 P 

/"7:00a New Almaden /4:l0 p 

17:30 A Sunday Excursion for San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, 

and principal way statlous J8:30 P 

8:00 A San Jose, Tres Plnos. Santa Cruz, Paclfio Grove. Salinas, San 

Luis Oblspo.Santa Barbara.and principal Intermediate stations 7 :30 P 

10:30 A San Jose and way stations 4:10 P 

11=30 a San Jose and way stations ... 5:30 p 

f2:45 p San Mateo, Redwood. MenloPark. Palo Alto, Santa Clara.San 
Jo e, Tves Plnos, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, and Pacific 

Grove t!0:45 A 

8:30 p San Jose and way stations 6:30a 

t4:15 p San Jose and principal way stations 9:45 a 

t5:00 p San Jose, Los Gatos. and principal way stations |9:00 a 

5;30 P San Jose and pilnclpal way stations 8:36 A 

6:00 P Redwood, San Jose. Gilroy, Salinas. Santa Barbara, Los An- 
geles ]O:00 A 

6:00 p Del Monte, Monterey, Pacific Grove, Lompoc 10:00 a 

6:30 p San Jose and wey stations t8:00 A 

all .45 p 8an Jose and way stations 7 :30 p 

Afor Morning. p for Afternoon. f Sundays excepted- 

X Sundays only- f Tuesdays and Fridays. a Saturdays only. 

' Monday. C Saturday and Sunday. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and other 
information, 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p. M., fo 
YOKOHAMA AND HONG KONG. 

calling at Kobe (Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hongkong 
with Bteamers for India, etc. No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

Doric (via Honolulu).-. Tuesday July 9. 1901 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Friday, August 2, 1901 

GaeUc (via Honolulu) Tuesday, August 27. 1901 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Friday, September 20. 1901 

Rojjnd Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 
For freight or paBBage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street 
corner First. D. D. STTJBBS, Geneial Manager. 



Santa Fc 
Route 



7:20 A.M. LOCAL FOR FRESNO. BAKERSFIELD, 

and intermediate points. 9 a.m. California Limited, 
with Sleepers. Dining and Observation Cars to Kansas 
City and Chicago. 4 :20 p. m. Local for Stockton. 8 P- M. 
Overland Express, with Palace and Tourist Sleepers and 
Chair Cars San Francisco > l t : aro. 



From San Francisco 



At iO a. m. 



CHICAGO, UNION PACIFIC AND 

NORTH-WESTERN LINE 

Double Drawing-Room Sleeping Cars. Buffet, Smoking and 
Library Cars, with barber. Dining Cars— meals a la carte. Daily 
Tourist Car Service and Personally Conducted Excursions every 
week from San Francisco at 6 p. m. The best of everything. 
R. R. RITCHIE, General Agent Pacific Coast, 

617 Market St., Palace Hotel, San Francisco. 

C. A. MURD0CK, FRINTERS««» 

Nc. 532 CLAY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

CALIFORNIA NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY CO. 

LESSEE 

SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC R'Y CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. TnnmoN Ferry — Foot of Market Street 

WEEK DAYS— 7:80. 9:00, 11:00 a.m.; 12:35,3:30,6:10.6:30 p.m. Thursdays- 
Extra Trip at 11:30 p.m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:50 and 11:30 p.m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:Oo 9:30. 11:00 a.m, ; 1:30, 3:30, 5:00, 6:20 p.m. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO 

WEEK DAYS— 6:10. 7:50. 9:20, 11:10 a.m.; 12:45. 3:40, 5:10 P.M. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1:55 and 6:35 P.M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10.9:40. 11:10 a.m.. 1:40. 3:40. 5:05. 6:25 p.m. 

Between San Francisoo and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



Leave San Francisco 

Week days I Sundays 

7:30 AM K:00 am 

3:30 PM 9:30 am 

5:10 PM I 5:00 PM 



In Effect Nov. 7. 1900 I Arrive at San Francisco 



Sundays I Week days 
10:40 am I 8:40 AM 
6,05 Pm 10:25 am 

7:35 pm I 6:23 pm 



Destinations 

Novato 

Petal uma 

Santa Rosa 



7:30 am 
3:30 Pm 



Fulton. Windsor. 
Healdsburc. Lytton, 

Qeyservllle. Cloverdale I 



J 10.-25 AM 
7'.35 PM I 6:22 PM 



7:30 AH 


8:00 AH | 


Hopland. Ukiah 


1 7;!5 PH 


6:22 PH 


7:30 AH 

3:30 fm 


3.00 AH 1 


Guernevtlle 


1 7:36 ph 


10:25 ah 

6:22 PM 


7:30 ah 
5:10 ph 


8:00 AM I 

6:00 ph 1 


Sonoma 

Glen Ellen 


1 9:15 am 
1 6:05 PM 


8:40 am 
6:22 pm 


7:30 AH 

8:30 m 


8:00 ah 1 

5:00 PH 1 


Sebafitopol 


1 10:40 AM 
J 7:35 PM 


1 10:25 »M 
1 6:22 PM 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs and White Sulphur 
Springe; at Fulton for Altruria; at Lytton for Lytton Springs; at Geyperville 
for Skaggfi' Springs; at Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hopland for Duncan 
SpriDgs, Highland Springs, KelBeyville, Carlsbad Springs, Soda Bay, Lake- 
port, and Bartlett Springs; at TJkfah. for Vichy Springs, Saratoga Springs, 
Bine Likes, Lfuirel Del Lake, Witter Springs, Upper Lake. Pomo, Potter 
Valley. John Day's. Riverside, Lierley's, BuckneH's, Sanhedrin Heights, 
Hullville, Booneville, Philo, Cbristinp Soda Springs, Navarro, Whitesboro, 
Albion. Little River. Orr's Springs. Mendocino City. Fort Bragg, Westport. 
Usal Willits, Laytonville. Cummings, Bell's Springs, Harris, Olaens, Doyer, Scotia 
and Eureka. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays, Round 
Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 

TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle BuildiDg. 
H. C. WHITING, Gen. Man. R. X. RYAN, Gen. PasB. Agent. 

Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 8teamer8leaveBroadwa y Wharf - 

Sun FrntirriiMMV 






San Francisco. 

For Alaskan ports, 11 a.m,: June 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30- 
July 5; chance to company's steamers at Seattle. 

For B. C- and Purzet Sound Ports. 11 a.m.. J une 5, 10, 
15, 20, 25. 30. July 5, and every flf.h day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay). 1 :30 p.m., July 1, 6, 11, 15, 
20, 25. 30. Aug 4, and every tilth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Santa Barbara, Port 
Los Angeles, Redondo (Los Alleles). Steamer "Queen," Wednesdays, 
9 A.M., Steamer * Santa Rosa," Sundays, 9 a.m. 

For Los Angelep. calling at Santa Cruz. Monterey, San Simeon. Cayucos, 
Port Harford (San Luis Obispo), Oaviota. Santa Barbara, Ventura. Hue- 
neme. San Pedro. East San Pedro, and 'Newport (* Corona only). 
Steamer "Corona," Saturdays, 9 a.m.; Steamer ''Bonlta." Tuesdays. 

9 A.M. 

For Mexican Ports, 10 a.m., 7th of each month. 

For further information obtain company's folder. 

The company reserves the right to chance steamers, sailing dates, and 
hours of sailing without previous notice. 

TICKET OFFICE— No, 4 New Montgomery street (Palace Hotel). 

G00DALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen. Acts. 10 Market St , San Franolsar 



SS " Sierra," Thursday, July 11, at 10 a. m. 

SS " Ventura," Thursday, Aug 1, 10 a. m. 

SS "Australia," for Tahiti. Tues.. Aug 6. 10a.m. 

1 Ine to Coolgardte. Australia, and Capetown. 

South Africa. 

J. D. SpRECKELS & BROS. CO.. 
Agents. 043 Market Street. Freight Offlce. 337 
Market St., San Francisco, 




Prle* per copy, 10 cent*. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1858. 



Annual Subscription, S4.00 




(fMifxrrum 




Volume LXIII. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 13, 1901. 



Number 2. 



Crimed and published every Saturday by the proprietor, FRED 
MARRIOTT. 5" j Kearny strict, San Francisco. Entered at .San FrHii- 
clsco I'osloffice as second-cla,s matter. 

Tbeoffl.v of (be a P. NEWS LETTER in London. Eng., is at 30 L'ornhill 
-. London, England, (George Street A Co., Representatives), where 
Information may be obtained regarding subscriptions and advertising 
rate-. Faris. France— Office. No. 37 Avenue de L'Opera. 

All social items, announcements, advertising or other matter, intended for 
pub.icatloD in the current number of the NEWS LETTER should be 
sent to this office not later than 6 p.m. Thursday. 

Seedless prunes have been developed by a California horti- 
CUltUtist Who will start a pruneless boarding house? 



In her last race the Constitution has beaten the Columbia 
and the Independence, so Uncle Sam is a bit more cheerful. 



Kaiser Wilhelm has become joint partner in a German rail- 
load, which like the strenuous monarch, promises more 
speed than safety. 



Croker lost $62,000 at the races in England last week. A 
little more of that will remove all uncertainty as to whether 
he will enter politics again. 



It is worthy of cheerful comment that, although the drug- 
gists are preparing to strike, the physicians and dentists 
have not yet been heard from. 



The interesting fiction of Mr. James Creelman, the imagi- 
native correspondent, is soon to look like mere prose. Mr. 
Max O'Rell is writing foreign letters. 



Mrs. John Bradbury, of Los Angeles, is in San Francisco. 
The dailies gave her only three lines. Such is fame. She got 
pages when she was here three years ago. 



Mrs. Craven wants three months devoted to her suit 
against the Fair estate. Three minutes would be enough 
to convince anyone of the unworth of her claim. 



The Epworth League convention will bring sixty thousand 
visitors to San Francisco. That means that at least sixty 
thousand dollars will be dropped here. 



If the State Board of Barber Examiners does nothing more 
than carry out its intention of suppressing the filthy barber 
colleges its appointment will be worth while. 



Captain John Ross claims to have discovered the wreck 
of the Rio de Janeiro. That shows poor taste on the Cap- 
tain's part. The joke has ceased to be funny through con- 
tinual repetition. 



The literary searchlight of the Call has discovered that 
Mr. Rudyard Kipling has plagiarized from the works of Mr. 
Ihomas Fleming Day. Mr. Kipling wanted only this dis- 
covery to insure his permanent greatness. 



Mr. Walter Hobart intends to enter for the Monterey races 
this year a horse bred hy a Colorado outlaw. This raises a 
question of racing ethics. If a race is won by an outlaw's 
horse can the winnings be counted fair? 



It looks now as though it was only a matter of months 
before Cuba becomes a part of the United States. All of 
which shows that a war of humanity may bring quick re- 
ward and substantial. Does any other oppressed island 
want to be saved from a haughty tyrant? 



Once in a while a preacher is right, as, for instance, the 
St. Louis pastor who has decided that "shirt-waist" men shall 
not attend his church. 



Rejoice, ye commons! The Chateau de Valencay has been 
restored to the house of Castellaine. If the same house of 
Castellaine could scrape up another marriageable son the 
titled possessors might soon be able to pay the water rates 
and the hired help. 



The war is ended in the Philippines. It ended when Agui- 
naldo was captured. Of course, they are having battles 
right along, Americans and Filipinos are being killed, a 
lebel leader is caught once in a while, and more engagements 
are looked for. But the war is ended. 



Murderer Brandes, recipent of an assault and battery 
sentence for the killing of his own child, still imagines him- 
self to be a misused man, so will petition for a pardon. 
Brandes does not appreciate the possibilities ahead of him. 
He may get a job as bookkeeper of Folsom. 



In Chicago they have formed a society of "White Boxers," 
organized to fight the "Chinee and the Coon." The society 
threatens to use every expedient of brutality to terrorize 
the dark-skinned races off the American continent. Their 
name is too mild. "White Christians" would go a great 
deal further as a pure blood curdler. 



Sergeant Conboy is a good officer. He has successfully 
l aided almost a half dozen Chinese opium dens in the past 
week. But does anyone believe for a moment that Conboy's 
raids are going to accomplish anything toward discouraging 
the opium habit in Chinatown? Better give the Sergeant 
something easy and detail him to remove Chinatown bodily. 



King Edward VII has refused to bestow the Order of the 
Garter on King William of Wurtemberg. He says that 
William is coarse and boorish, and has horrid table manners. 
William, on the other hand, asserts that Edward's fondness 
for cards and the fair sex make him an undesirable associate. 
Wouldn't it be a joke if both were right? 



Several American zealots fighting for the Boers have been 
captured by the British and will be held as prisoners till the 
end of the war. The British refuse to consider the captives' 
rights as Americans, declaring that they have no rights; 
and their stand is a correct one. The Anarchistic Populists 
who have voluntarily allied themselves with the mediaeval 
religion and semi-barbarous dirt of the Boers are expatriots 
and undeserving of American protection. 



The Directors of the Institute for the Deaf, Dumb, and 
Blind at Berkeley have received a deserved rebuke from 
Governor Gage for not prosecuting William Hoffman, the 
attendant whose criminal carelessness caused the death of 
little Wirt Allen at that institution. So far no effort at prose- 
cution has been made. But what would be the good of try- 
ing the case anywhere in Alameda County? That common- 
wealth is gaining an unenviable reputation lately as a place 
where crime stalks immune, where ordinary murder is as- 
sault and battery, and the most fiendish killing imaginahle 
is nothing but manslaughter. It is time for the people over 
there to revise their moral standards. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 13, 1901. 



$750,000 FOR A LIBRARY. 

From Scotland to San Francisco is a far cry. but not too 
far. it seems, for Mr. Andrew Carnegie to drop twenty dollar 
pieces all the way. After leaving ten millions in the land 
of his birth, other millions in New York. Philadelphia, Pitts- 
lurg, Detroit, and other places of more or less renown, he 
reaches out to this far-off Pacific Coast, and drops three- 
quarters of a million into the lap of San Francisco. Upon 
the principle of not looking a gift horse in the mouth, 
ve shall take the money, give thanks to the princely donor, 
and try to make the best possible use of his generous gift. 
With it we shall buy the brain work of all mankind since 
the art preservative of all arts became known. Turned 
mto books for the free use of the million, that large sum 
will make the mechanic a better man and the man a better 
mechanic. It will fructify and grow, and hasten the day 
when this glorious Coast of ours shall realize the fulfillment 
of its manifest destiny. We are not of those who would try 
to feel mean over the acceptance of this beneficent educa- 
tional endowment. The money is freely and cheerfully 
given. It will go where it will do good for all time to come. 
Besides, it is only a partial return of our own money. It was 
ail made within a few short years out of a protective tariff 
that laid taxes upon us all. It was in the matter of iron 
end steel a needless tariff, as Mr. Carnegie's enormous for- 
tune shows, and he is but returning conscience money. It 
is a case in which the giving is twice blessed. It blesses 
him who gives and we who receive. We can well afford to 
take the money, be thankful, and let it go at that. 

Now comes the question of its expenditure. A great many 
wild ideas are finding their way into print on that point. 
One suggestion is to buy the land on which the Mechanics' 
Pavilion stands for $600,000, and to erect a building and fill 
it with books with the balance. That is absurd. Six hun- 
dred thousand dollars is a disproportionate amount to give 
lor a mere vacant site, and would not leave sufficient to ac- 
complish what is desired. The lot is not worth the money, 
it is not as well located as it might be, and the city owns 
more available sites. What is the matter with building as 
.learly in tne center of Union Square as may be. leaving the 
space all around to be planted as now? A four-sided square 
building, with entrances on all sides, would be a command- 
ing and an attractive object in the center of the best block 
in the city. We do not believe in closing the other libraries 
from which books can be taken. They fill a place that a great 
educational library never can. The more lending libraries 
in and around the city the better.^ We should be sure that 
we are right about this matter before we go ahead. 



A DISCOVERY OF OIL ALREADY REFINED. 
We are upon an era of oil expansion. Speculators in oil 
lands are everywhere. Deals are made almost daily in which 
fortunes are either made or lost. The one drawback to all 
this is that crude oil needs to be refined, which involves the 
erection of an expensive plant. The sand dunes of Florida 
have, however, yielded petroleum already refined — the com- 
mon kerosene of commerce — all ready to burn in lamps. 
The discovery caused quite a furore, and soon some 500,000 
acres of land were sold at satisfactory prices. The oil 
cozed out in spots along a sand bank several miles in length. 
But to this discovery there is an explanation. It resembles 
nothing so much as the finding of diamonds in Arizona a 
few years ago. All old Californians will remember the epi- 
sode, which took in such shrewd operators as Mr. W. C. 
Ralston, Mr. D. O. Mills, and Mr. Lloyd Tevis. The enter- 
1 rising speculators who prepared the Arizona fields for dis- 
covery were a little hard up for diamonds in the rough and 
unpolished state, and made the mistake of using two or three 
stones which had evidently been through the hands of Am- 
sterdam lapidaries. The mistake of the Florida speculators 
is of a line nature. In that region crude oil is not common. 
Time being the essence of the deal, all the refined oil pro- 
curable was bought up. and with it the sand was saturated 
or "salted," as miners would say. Clearly there is altogether 
too much refinement about the Florida speculators. We are 
inclined to ask what next? The oil regions of California 
are not all exploited yet, and present illimitable possibilities 
still. Our speculators' reputations will suffer if they remain 
content with being outwitted by Florida. 



ADULTERATED WINES. 

California's wine industry, which, if properly attended to, 
will grow into great proportions, is threatened. Instead 
of holding their own th€ sales of California wine in the 
East are decreasing. This is brought about by the sale 
of cheap, poisonous stun* at far smaller prices than we can 
put our product on the market for. "Brick vineyards" 
are turning out thousands of barrels of a vile concoction 
which ine manufacturers flavor with California wine and sell 
at a price against which our growers cannot compete. It 
is dosed with salicylic acid, and is sold to the lower classes 
of Italians and French, who are satisfied with anything 
that is red and stimulating. It would be a death-dealing 
concoction to anyone not equipped with a cast-iron stomach, 
but these people seem to thrive upon it. 

Good, light wine, such as can be made in California for 
less than fifty cents a gallon, is a temperance promoter, 
and if the people of the United States could be educated 
into drinking it more good would be done than by prohibi- 
tory or sumptuary laws. People will drink, and should be 
taught the benefit of claret. It is hard to educate- them, 
thougn. when such poisons as are being sold in the East 
go under that name. There are pure food laws, and there 
should be a national pure wine law. People who want quan- 
tity instead of quality will buy the cheapest they can find, re- 
gardless of the injury it does them. California can compete 
against any country in the world in turning out real wine, 
but it cannot sell it in competition with such mixtures as 
Eastern manufacturers are placing on the market. In fact, 
they are coming westward with their product, and if some- 
thing is not done, it will not be long before the stuff turned 
out by these "brick vineyards" is being sold right under our 
i, oses. All Californians who want to see the? vineyard own- 
ers prosper should aid in securing legislation calling for 
a strict supervision of the quality of wines placed before the 
public. It will not be easy, as there will be much opposition. 
But there is a great deal at stake, and no effort should be 
spared to do this toward saving what has grown to be a 
great industry, and promises, under proper conditions, to 
be a greater one. 



THE CHINESE REFORMER NOT TO BE DEPORTED. 

Su Chih Chin, the Chinese reformer, came to San Fran- 
cisco with papers that were regular on their face, and he 
c ught to have been promptly permitted to land. Instead of 
which the Collector of this port chose to lend himself in 
k super-serviceable capacity to the Chinese Consul, and de- 
tained bu Chih Chin in prison, and would doubtless have 
proceeded to send him back to China to lose his head for 
a purely political offense had not the authorities in Washing- 
ton interfered in time. Peremptory orders were at once 
telegraphed to him to "send on the papers in the Su case." 
One would have thought that would have awakened him to 
a sense of his duty, but it appears that it did not. Instead 
of obeying orders he held on to the papers and wrote to 
Washington that he was holding them pending advices from 
the Chinese Government, which proposed to attack their 
tegularity. This was altogether too much for the Secretary 
of the Treasury to endure, and in consequence he tele- 
graphed the Collector a sharp reprimand, telling him "he 
was not obeying orders," and he was again instructed to for- 
ward the papers "without further delay." The Secretary- 
was very angry and gave out the facts to the press for pub- 
lication, and it looks as if the Collector's official head sits 
us loosely on his shoulders as Su's would have done had he 
been ordered deported. It is really amazing that an Ameri- 
can official should have been looking to the Dowager Em- 
press for instructions and not to his own Government. 
It would seem that we have a Collector with shockingly 
misguided sympathies. Washington has since ordered that 
Su be landed and released. There must be something in this 
reformer or the Chinese Government would not be so anx- 
ious to get possession of his body. Some two or three years 
ago he was in London, where the Chinese Minister had him 
kidnaped and confined within file embassy. The authorities, 
however, got wind of what was going on, disregarded the 
sanctity usually accorded to the residence of a foreign 
Minister, released the prisoner, and insisted upon the recall 
of the Minister. It is well that our Collector was not 
England's Premier at the time. 



July 13, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



WHO ROBBED THE MINT' 
The United States branch html n this rliy, has 

• ni of j.:m. and nobody Dp to tin- 

t inn make n reasonable guess ns to who did II 
I erinlenilent Leach will have to make good the amount, and 
hard as that may seem. It Is Just !!• « 11 the 

mil know its responsibilities. Knowing thorn, his vlgl- 
shonld have been bo great and his management so 
is to have rendered it impossible for anybody In his 
ace to enter the gold vault and get away with siv bag! 
containing $6,000 each. There must have been something 
\ery loose in the safeguarding of Uncle Sam's coin when 
that could be done without leaving so much as a suspicions 
trail behind. The vault was burglar proof as well as Are 
proof. The locks were of a kind that so far have proven im- 
pregnable. No signs exist that the vault was ever entered 
by foul means. The loss was not discovered, or if discovered, 
was not reported, until an agent of the United States Treas- 
ury, going his regular half-yearly rounds, found it out. 
Everybody was. of course, astonished, but nobody could ac- 
count for it. It is no secret that Mr. Leach has not spent 
as much of his time at the Mint as he ought to have done. 
Some half dozen employees have had access to the vault 
at one time or another. It does not appear that any sort of 
v atch was put over them. They simply went in and out in 
such manner and at such hours as best pleased them. Hence 
lobbery was found to be easy. It is hardly possible that 
the thief can be far on*. There is some talk of inducing the 
employees to pay an assessment equal to the deficiency. 
It would be a shameless proceeding. Catch the thief and see 
that he makes it good. Failing in that, let the man whose 
lax methods provided the temptation and the opportunity 
for robbery pay for his own neglect. 



SPRING VALLEY'S SUIT. 
The Spring Valley Water Company has brought suit 
in the Federal District Court to set aside the water rates 
recently "fixed" by the City Fathers. It ought not to have 
been driven, in the interests of its stockholders, a majority 
of whom are residents of this city, to determine things that 
have long ago been sett.ed. First, the Superior Court of 
San Francisco, Judges Wallace, noge and Shatter sitting 
in hank, laid down the principles upon which water rates 
should be fixed, in a manner so sinrple that a wayfaring man 
though a fool need not err therein. Secondly, the Supreme 
Court of the State, in deciding the case of San Diego, adopted 
and re-enacted, so to speak, the principles of our own 
Superior Court, and it went to the unusual length of practi- 
cally instructing the Supervisors in the methods they should 
pursue in determining just and equitable compensation to 
water companies. But our present Supervisors have seen 
fit to disregard the State courts' and their instructions. It 
is a question as to how far an elected State Judiciary would 
go in enforcing its judgments. In view of that possible 
dilemma, Spring Valley has gone to the Federal courts, 
which are not afraid to issue injunctions and punish for con- 
tempts. The Supervisors would have done well to have 
avoided- an appeal to that quarter. They will lose character 
and the city will lose money by the litigation about to en- 
sue. 



WHO IS TO BE OUR NEXT LOCAL BOSS? 

Buckley is making wine and drinking it at Livermore and 
the boys follow him no more. Tnat lets him out of politics. 
Rainey, having lost his grip on the Police and Fire Depart- 
ments, has parted with all that ever raised him above his 
i.atural occupation of shoveling sand. Martin Kelly is still 
somewhat in evidence, because certain newspapers have 
use for him, but he has no real power Of his own. Where, 
then, are we to look for our next local boss? The city has 
never got along without one during its fifty years of muni- 
cipal life. Our politics, for reasons apparent enough, do 
not run themselves very well. What is everybody's business 
is nobody's business. Left to mere chance it is hard to say 
who would be nominated for office, and harder still to say 
who would be elected. The hoodlums and the boys are out 
of local politics except for the "divarsion" they may find in 
them. Civil service examination and fixity of tenure have 



put the np«ll« nlv.iv.- UtOll r. in b Tl 

Britain, Clement, nn.i we km.- 

In the M urage, 

who railed to wag the dog The dog, however, proved quite 
equal to the task . >f wagging them, nn.i ■ -imn ■■ 

th.-y .ut and ran. The truer and purer strains in tie Demo- 

neiiiiel in. iv gel behind the Mayor as ■ manager, in 
which ease it is mure than likely that this DenlC 
would mi Democratic. The two papers, "both daily," mean to 
fighl In harness for local control. Tiny will have their pnlns 
for their gains. They are already the cause of much amuse 
ment Newspapers may gel in behind bosses, if they are 
discreet about it. but when they come out Into the open 
everybody wants to shy a dead cat at them. Besides, Messrs. 
Sprei kels and !>>■ Young have nothing in common. The best 
l ubllc use to which they ran be put is to act as a corrective 
to each other. 



A NEW LAW FOR MEDICOS. 

A new law that has caused a Hurry among medical men is 
the one which requires that after August 1st of this year 
every one who wishes to practice medicine in this State 
must present to the State Medical Society satisfactory evi- 
dence of good moral character and a diploma issued by some 
legally chartered medical school, and must pass a written 
or oral examination prepared by the State Medical Society. 
Under this law the most noted physician in the world — be 
his name Dr. S. Weir Mitcneil or greater, if such exist — 
cannot come into California and locate for the practice of 
medicine without an examination. The law is a good one for 
reputable physicians and for the public. Years ago, when 
San Francisco was overrun by quacks of all kinds, the News 
Letter waged a vigorous fight against them, and succeeded 
in having laws passed similar to the one which goes into 
force next month. 

One of the most important clauses in this new law, and 
one that, if carried out, will cause a scattering among ille- 
gal practitioners, is that which says that the applicant 
must produce satisfactory testimonials of good moral char- 
acter. Let the society see that this part of the law is given 
the strictest interpretation and vigorously applied. There 
are quacks by the hundreds in this town, fattening off the 
money of dupes and growing rich through the murders they 
commit. They are absolutely brazen in their methods, and 
the uaiiy papers assist the""Dr: O'Donnells and the Dr. 
Sweeneys in their nefarious work by selling them pages of 
advertising. The first duty of the State Medical Society 
should be to see that the Sweeneys and O'Donnells are ban- 
ished, and that no more are allowed to gain a foothold 
here. 



THE KLUGE-SUTRO CONTEST. 

It is only a month now until the contest opens between 
Mrs. Clara Kluge-Sutro and the heirs of the Sutro estate, 
the trial having been set for August 15th. Much interest 
is taken by outsiders in this trial, and public sympathy is 
plainly on the side of Mrs. Kluge-Sutro, whose two children 
are the children of the late Ex-Mayor Sutro, and are surely 
entitled to a share of the property he left behind. The case 
bears no resemblance to the many blackmailing schemes that 
have been instituted in this city. It is in direct contradis- 
tinction to Mrs. Craven's case against the Fair estate. In 
this instance, there was no valid claim — merely a forged 
pencil will and an assertion, not backed up by facts, that she 
had been married to Senator Fair. In Mrs. Kluge-Sutro's case 
there is direct proof of her marriage to Mr. Adolph Sutro, 
if his introduction of her to his associates as his wife and 
his acknowledgment of her children as his count for any- 
thing. 

All these things will be brought into evidence when the 
case comes to trial. Mrs. Kluge-Sutro has plenty of wit- 
nesses to prove her claims, as the forthcoming trial will 
prove. Her attorney, Judge Paterson, tried hard to compro- 
mise the case, but the Sutro heirs have forced it to a trial, 
a fact which thiey may have cause to regret. It is certain 
that in the end the present course will cost the heirs a far 
larger figure than a compromise would have amounted to. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 13, 1901. 



A COMPLIMENT FOR OUR ARMY. 

General Wolseley's recent admission that the United 
States army is the best in the world tor its size is a high 
compliment from one who until recently was the Commander 
in Chief ot the British forces. Our army is the best because 
it is drawn from the largest number of people, who for the 
most part are accustomed to the rough and tumble of coun- 
try life. Farming the land, leveling the forest, delving into 
the bowels of the earth in quest of minerals constitute men 
of muscle who are fit to go anywhere and do almost any- 
thing. They are resourceful, handy and hardy men, with a 
sufficient amount of self-reliance to be trusted to give a good 
account of themselves without an excessive amount of com- 
manding. The time was when it was thought that a re- 
cruit could not be licked into shape as a good soldier in 
less than twelve months. We now know better. "We know 
that a volunteer just caught, though not as steady as a 
regular, is yet capable of going into the field and giving 
a good account of himself. It might be different if he had 
to meet the excessively well-drilled men of the German and 
French armies, but the fighting of the future is not going 
to be of that kind. Pitched battles between armies drilled 
like machines are not likely to occur in our day. There will 
be no more solid squares, as at Waterloo, because Maxim 
guns, long Toms, and lydditte shells render close formations 
impossible. The Boers understand how that is*. They have 
done but little hand to hand fighting, at which they would 
have been beaten all the time. They have been and still 
are contented with placing their guns where they would do 
the most good, and in fighting at long range. From a 
European standpoint their armies have been so many mobs, 
but they prove to be terribly effective ones. Tommy Atkins, 
though a man of stout courage, was at a great disadvantage 
in confronting Boers behind kopjes. The Australians, Cana- 
dians and New Zealanders, trained like our own men, were 
equal to the emergency, and on many occasions beat the 
Boers at their own game. England will yet learn the wisdom 
of training her soldiers in the colonies. At the same time 
she had better establish half a dozen West Points. To do 
her justice, she is very much alive to her weakness, and 
bent upon making good all deficiencies. 



WHEN THE DOWAGER EMPRESS IS HERSELF AGAIN. 

When the foreign troops are well out of Peking it will be 
interesting to watch how the* Dowager Empress will settle 
down to business again. She may never come back to Pe- 
king, for that place has been made too accessible to the 
white devils to suit her taste. She will be likely to prefer 
to work her machinations at a safer distance. Some days 
ago the dispatches gave substance to rumors that she was 
plotting to have the young Emperor "removed ' in order to 
make way for the son of the unspeakable Prince Tuan, 
who has been sent into a pleasant temporary exile. If these 
rumors have any basis of fact, it would appear that the 
events of the last twelve months have failed to touch the 
heart of the ancient empire. The latest advices are, how- 
ever, more reassuring, indicating as they do that something 
of the spirit of the foreigners has taken hold of the official 
class. The Manchu Princes have been warned that they 
must keep clear of seditious societies upon pain of decapi- 
tation, and in various other ways the Government has shown 
that it really means to frown on the anti-foreign bands of 
natives whose activities brought upon China troubles she 
is never likely to forget. Very significant is the edict order- 
ing the peace-maintaining Governor of the province of Shan- 
tung to remain in office despite the death of his mother, 
which is in violation of Chinese custom and tradition, 
which prescribe many form's of exhibiting veneration for 
parents, including, in the case of the death of a mother, a 
period of three years mourning, and cessation from the 
duties of public office. The Governor has been directed 
to supply native soldiers for the occupation of Peking 
when the foreigners have gone, and this duty is looked upon 
as so important that he has been commanded not to mourn 
for his mother, but to give his best energies to his country. 
If the recent rough contact with the foreigners is going to 
teach the Chinese to regard their ancient customs as negli- 
gible there is no telling where the changes will end. • 



THE JULY DIVIDENDS. 

The dividends paid throughout the country on the 1st of 
July were enormous and are bound to increase with each 
recurring year. They are, for the most part, the first fruits 
of the great combinations that have recently entered into 
well-nigh all industrial pursuits. The New York Journal of 
Commerce has compiled from the reports of the various cor- 
porations whose securities are bought and sold in the ex- 
changes of that city, the amount of dividends and interest 
payments made on the first of July. The total is $103,000,000; 
an amount which has never before been equaled in the his- 
tory of the country. Of this amount $51,500,000 are divi- 
dends on railroad and industrial stocks, and $51,500,000 on 
railroad and industrial bonds. The railroads pay $47,300,000 
interest on their outstanding bonds, while only $4,200,000 
is paid on borrowed capital by the industrials, which shows 
that the organized industrials are more independent than 
are the railroads in the matter of borrowed money. This 
more clearly appears from the amount of dividends paid on 
stock by the two classes of securities. The railroad stocks 
yielded $20,100,000 while the industrials paid $21,400,000. 
There is not included in these figures the interest paid on 
Government bonds, or the interest or dividends paid in June 
or August, but only the interest and dividends paid on the 
1st of July on the two classes of private or semi-private 
corporations. A complete statement of the money paid by the 
various stock companies throughout the country would 
probably show that more than $250,000,000 were distributed 
every six months. The earnings of partnerships and indi- 
vidual enterprises not incorporated, are hundreds of millions 
more. It would be interesting to learn exactly the difference 
between the total earnings of private business men, and 
those of the great corporations and trusts. We should 
then know, as an ascertained fact, how near corporate com- 
bination has come to -owning tne business of the country. 
Unfortunately there is no known way at present of reach- 
ing the figures. Private business men do not publish their 
account sales from the house-tops. A new kind of property 
has come into the world to stay. Hereafter, bank vaults 
and safe deposit boxes will contain the evidences of the 
world's wealth. Men and women, with more or less money, 
will own dividend earning stocks, and only to brainy men 
will the employment of capital be entrusted. The mere 
workers will toil on a lower plane than before. 



THE DEATH OF PROFESSOR LE CONTE. 

Despite what pessimists say to the contrary, death some- 
times removes a man whose place cannot be filled. Such 
men are few, to be sure. Not many have qualities of heart 
and mind that make them invaluable to the Test of the human 
race. Such a. man, though, was Professor Joseph Le Conte, 
of the University of California. Beloved and venerated 
by all who knew him, and by thousands who, not know- 
ing him, had been helped and uplifted by his teachings, 
he has gone to rest with a crown of honor such as few are 
entitled to wear. His friends cannot find words to express 
their appreciation of his life and its work or their regret 
at his death. 

For over thirty years he held the chair of zoology and 
geology at the State University. His rare attainments made 
him an authority, and he was recognized as one of the great- 
est thinkers of the century. Innumerable honors were be- 
stowed upon him by scientific societies all over the world. 
He was the author of many books on different scientific 
and philosophical subjects, and the results of his researches 
and thought were of rare value. But it was as a teacher that 
Professor Le Conte excelled. Thoroughly unselfish, devoted 
to his duty, with no thought but to spread the knowledge 
he possessed, his work stood out above all others. He was 
an ideal professor — a man of almost boundless learning, with 
the rare faculty of imparting to others what he knew, and 
with a personality that won the love of the students and 
made them eager to listen to every word he uttered. Ber- 
keley will never know such another as Joseph Le Conte. 

He died where he would have chosen to die — in the Yos- 
emite Valley, his favorite spot on earth. It was on his tenth 
'.isit to the valley that he passed away, in the shadows of 
the domes and crags whose beauty and grandeur he never 
tired of describing. 



.'uly 13, 1901. SAN FRANCI9CO NEWS LETTER. 

How to be Swell Though Camping ^__^__ 



By Mr». Chauncey De Wit. 

Mit» Green, who came out here from Now York to art as 
one of Mary Scott's bridesmaids. Is on her way to Yosemlte 
Valley. Miss QrMO Is ■ typical Gotham modish, who follows 
lii-ts of fashion as all true elegantes should. In the 
Kast "any old thing" won't do for a roughing excursion. 
Many are the so-called "camps" In the mountains, but the; 
are log palaces in disguise, with a retinue of servants, headed 
by a chef who keeps the wires hot with orders. And the 
tamping togs of the men and women are selected with the 
fastidious nicety that characterizes any other purchase. 
Maid Marion has scarlet jacket and green box coat; Jaunty 
golf skirts, smart leggins and trim boots: breeiy blouses and 
clinging sweaters; saucy little caps, and broad-brimmed 
shade hats. Perhaps you fancied she pressed into service 
discarded clothes for these excursions, instead of having a 
sartorial seance before she could be ready. These are days 
(Then man realizes he must specialize to be successful in 
business, and women have caught the cue. And surely the 
thief business of woman consists in trying to look her best 
under all circumstances. 

When Miss Green made up her mind to go to the Yosemite 
she wanted to know at once who could best tailor her for the 
occasion. A California girl would have used her last season 
golf skirt and a haphazard lot of shirtwaists. But Miss 
Green, as befits a well-groomed Gothamite, had some very 
chic pedestrian costumes made. A smart gray serge cos- 
tume, the skirt cut very short yet flaring smartly, and a 
jaunty jacket, was the backbone of the outfit. Some crisp 
linen skirts, tailored to perfection, and some shirts of 
faultless cut and pattern, were included, and of course she 
I. ad to have one of the new green cloth jackets with buff 
cloth collar and cuff, and gold buttons engraved with her 
monogram. There you have an outing wardrobe in perfect 
taste and simplicity, yet just as smart and modish as sartor- 
ial art can make it. 

* * * 

How grateful the slim women ought to feel to kindly fash- 
ion that is throwing everything their way. The. extremely 
thin were once painful in the tight-fitting tailor gowns that 
prevailed, but in this era of fancy tailor costumes their thin- 
ness becomes slenderness — the big sailor collar and revers 
are the magicians that accomplish this wonder. Mrs. Will 
Taylor is wearing a very pretty blue gown on her shopping 
excursions to town. The skirt has two rough edge flounces 
and the Eton is ornamented with a white satin sailor col- 
lar closely dotted in black, a standing collar of like design 
finishing the Eton. 

* * * 

What dreams of gowns will be sunned at the Del Monte 
meet, guaranteed to give the nightmare to the unfortunates 
who have not invested in fine feathers. Mrs. Dan Murphy has 
a white duchesse chiffon gown swathed in tissue now, but 
ready to wear when the band strikes up. The bodice is 
laid in half-inch tucks with cream flowers appliqued over it. 
The elbow sleeves have the ubiquitous Marie Antoinette 
flounces and a broad* panne satin sash embroidered in gold 
ties in a graceful knot on one side. This is an innovation, 
tying sashes in black, that is likely to catch the fancy of 
those always on tiptoe for something new. The skirt of this 
beautiful gown is laid in bias tucks that are joined in the 
center with a cream insertion; it flares at the feet into two 
accordeon plaited flounces, beflowered with the lace applique. 

* * * 

Women who pride themselves on being ultra fashionable 
are badgering the shoe-dealers for the new patent-leather 
ties with large oval steel buckles. A belated stock is soon 
expected by one of the fashionable dealers, and meanwhile 
Mesdames Taylor, Francis Hopkins, and Mrs. Walter Martin 
are the cynosure of observing eyes, especially at street cross- 
ings, when the shining buckle is given a chance to do its best 
— a twin duty, for it not only pins attention to the exquisite 
hosiery now in vogue, but makes the foot look smaller 
than in the ordinary tie. It must be confessed that these 
buckle ties are rather garish for day wear, but considering 
the sponsors who have introduced them it would be daring 
to call them "bad form." 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 13, 1901. 




Tkasurelf 
Wand 



Ci/eo&yr 



Tom Jioon, 



The Alcazar Stock Company has been giving a very amia- 
ble performance of "The School for Scandal." with Florence 
Roberts essaying Lady Teasle for the first time. Miss Rob- 
erts is a fairly good actress as well as a charming woman; 
her personality has that quality of gentleness that is com- 
monly denominated by the much-abused participial adjective 
charming. It is this and not her art that accounts for her 
popularity. I can understand how many are quite fascinated 
by her, and I will agree with the feminine verdict that she 
if very sweet. The charm of her personality, always suffi- 
ciently in evidence, is particularly observable in the part of 
Lady Teasle, but it will not do to allow one's judgment of 
her acting to be too much influenced by such a consideration, 
although it goes a great way toward the mitigation of cer- 
tain deficiencies. It is her power to please that one must 
estimate, and the sentimental claims of natural gifts must 
be reckoned with as well as the esthetic aims of art. There 
are many performances of many plays that should be con- 
demned, or at least criticised, if measured by strict stand- 
ards of histrionism and literature, yet they fulfill the purpose 
of giving pleasure, and it is, in part, the reporter's province 
to relate the fact. "The public wants to know if a perform- 
nnce is worth while" is the cry of many; "it does not care 
shout the esthetics of acting and play-writing. It is the func- 
tion of the newspaper man. the critic, or whatever he calls 
himself, or is called, to tell us at what particular theatre 
there is a show worth the price of admission." For mine 
cwn part. I think that criticism should have a greater scope 
and a higher aim, but I may endeavor to defer to the demand- 
and give place to the news element, although I am relieved 
of the necessity very often, inasmuch as a play has often 
run its course by the time I get into type. 

* * * 

By way of news, which is five days old, the Alcazar Stock 
Company is giving a very good performance of "The 
School for Scandal." Miss Roberts as Lady Teasle, though 
lacking temperament, is very "charming," and attracts one 
rather more by her personality than by her art. Her per- 
formance is easy and even, though without any particular 
spell, and it is lacking in atmosphere. A lack of atmosphere, 
indeed, characterizes the presentation throughout, although 
one gets a whiff now and then of the true Sheridanism. In 
its quality of comedy of manners "The School for Scandal" 
should not only give us a glimpse at the eighteenth cen-.' 
tury, but to be quite acceptable it should take us back for 
six score years that we might live with Sir Peter and Charles 
Surface and feel how they and their lives differed from us 
and ours. In short, to be valuable (as a comedy of manners) 
ii should be convincing; it should have atmosphere. Dur- 
ing the present performance one does not for a moment for- 
get that it is July, 1901: that one is in the Alcazar Theatre, 
and that the personages in the play are in reality only a com- 
lany of actors whom we know all about, and whom we have 
seen in a number of other parts. This is not a condition to 
cry about exactly, particularly when the Comedy is as per- 
petually pleasing as "The School for Scandal." It is of itself 
eternally enjoyable, and as I have said, it is amiably done. 

• * * 

Mr. White Whittlesey is a competent Charles, particularly 
in his leave-taking after the screen scene. The Sir Peter 
of Mr. Barton Hill is formal and rather subdued, running 
neither to broad comedy nor excessive dignity. His concep- 
tion would not suffer were it a little stronger in color. 
Mr. Lucius Henderson is better as Joseph than I have yet 
seen him, though he does not reach all the opportunities of 
the part and lacks subtlety. His scene with Sir Peter in 
the fourth act is the one really tedious spot in the perform- 
ance, for which both are to blame. The very best acting 
of all in poise, manner, and in this case I must add atmos- 
;here, is the Sir Oliver of Mr. George Webster, who, barring 
an occasional excess of emphasis, was admirable. Mr. 



Edwin Emery pranced boisterously in the part of Careless, 
and Mr. Carlyle Moore as Sir Benjamin Backbite was a pon- 
cerous" exquisite. 

* * * 

Blanche Bates is responsible for the continued run of 
"Under Two Flags," which is about to enter its fourth week 
at the Columbia Theatre. Its longevity is entirely due to 
her attractiveness in the part oi Cigarette. As for the 
play it could not stand on its own merits. There seems 
to be but one opinion on this point. The play is hopelessly 
bad. I cio not think I have ever heard such unanimity. Every- 
one I have heard express themselves have denounced the 
piay as trash, conceding of course at the same time that 
Miss Bates' acting is delightful. General praise is not always 
a proof of merit, but when fault-finding is universal there 
i ■■ something radically wrong. I have declined to discuss 
"Under Two Flags" seriously as a play; as well write a grave 
review of "Ten Nights in a Bar-Room" or any one of a hun- 
dred of the crimson flood of melodramas. Blanche Bates and 
the scenery, however, are so well worth while that they 
should by no means be missed. 
• * • 

We have to thank the blistering heat in New \ork for the 
tood things of vaudeville which it drives hither. This is 
tne best season of the year at the Orpheum, and I dare 
say it is better patronized than any other summer resort in 
the country. I have seen good bills there before, bills in 
vhich only one or perhaps two turns were indifferent, but 
the current programme is so good from beginning to end 
that I am quite ready to pronounce it the best I have ever 
seen. There is no extraordinary star, but an evenness of 
merit from first to last that is quite remarkable. If I were 
to name a favorite, Mr. Irving Jones, who is new to us, 
might win the title. He is irresistibly funny in a somewhat 
different way. Finesse is not his forte, but he makes you 
laugh, and that well-nigh incessantly. Gilbert & Goldie 
have the same faculty. Their stuff is the usual mixture of 
new and old. but it is all good, and Gilbert's extraordinary 
manner is as amusing as ever. Mr. Clayton White and Marie 
Stuart have a new sketch which moves along briskly, and 
gives Miss Stuart the chance to introduce her specialties. 
Her dash is inimitable. The Emily Lytton and Charles Bow- 
ser Company have a snappy sketch by Mr. Will Cressy, 
whose name is appearing frequently on vaudeville pro- 
grammes nowadays. There is plenty of humor in this farce, 
which makes it hard to believe that the same author Is 
guilty of "Her Friend from Texas." Bimm, Bomm. and Brrr 
are musical clowns, modern in their methods and appliances, 
which are ingenious and spectacular. The other three turns 
which are athletic, are as good and better than many that 
have been called miraculous. 

* # * 

Salassa has been a name to conjure with for these sev- 
eral seasons, and it is time to announce the fact that he will 
be here again when the Grand Opera season opens at the 
Tivoli on the 29th inst. How much his noble voice and 
capable acting will contribute to the season is by no means 
a matter of conjecture. There is promise of great things for 
the opera enthusiast in the company and repertoire, which 
it is said will include some new operas. The "Fedora" and 
"Andrea Chenier" of Giordano, wuich have never been heard 
here, although the latter must be fully ten years old, are 
promised; also Boito's "Mephistofele" and Verdi's "Falstaf." 
One may be pardoned for being somewhat skeptical about 
these things, in view of the fact that similar promises have 
not been fulfilled in the past, but we will believe it when we 
hear the operas, and in the mean time we shall hope for 
the best. In times past I have made bold to offer some 
well-meaning suggestions to the Tivoli people, but my efforts 
have not been fruitful. I extracted a promise from them 
once that they would revive "I Puritani." but I am still wait- 
ing patiently. With the people they have the opera could be 
admirably cast, and with everything in favor of its being a 
success, and in all probability a popular hit. I remember, 
too, that some four years ago I submitted meekly that 
Agostini and Montanari should be engaged, and now behold! 
the deed is done and I am ready with the first Ilium of the 
season. Will they sing Puccini's "Manon Lescaut"? 1 hope 
so. If Grau or Ricordi or Boosey. or whoever it is that has 
them, will not cede the rights to "Boheme." perhaps there 



July 13. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



would not be the same difficulty about Manon One thing 
l.o certain. Agostlni and Montannrl ran sing the opera In a 
vay to draw one across the bay. I know, because I went to 
Oakland to hear them after seeing four performances In San 
Francisco. Signor Dado, who sang Don Baslllo so well al 
ti.e unique performance of the Ill-fated Semliruh season, 
will be the basso, with the useful Nlrollnl to alternate 
Collamarlnl. the popular favorite of last season, will return; 
also Russo. the little tenor with the big voice: F"er:irrl. the 
'.■aritone. and Signorlna Repetto. Barbareschi wui sing the 
heavier soprano roles, and Polletini will assume her share 
Of the contralto department. With Paul Steindorff as con- 
uuctor. the orchestra should prove highly efficient, as his 
thoroughness and skill are unquestioned. If this reads like 
■ press notice it is not my fault, for 1 mean all that I say 
I have grave doubts of Collamarini's fitness for some of the 
roles In which she is cast, and Castellano. the tenore di forza. 
is not to my liking: but the Tivoli season of grand opera is 
always worth while, and this year the outlook is. on the 
whole, encouraging. 

PORTER GARNETT. 



Mr. William Gillette's thrilling melodrama. "Held by the 
Lnemy." is on at the Central Theatre this week. Mr. James 
M. Brophy is playing the leading part, to the entire satis- 
laction of immense audiences, and all the parts are in good 
hands. "Michael Strogoff" will follow. 

* * • 

Florence Roberts, supported by White Whittlesey, and the 
lull strength of the Alcazar Stock Company, will usher in 
the eighth week of her season with a presentation of "The 
Country Girl." a comedy in three acts adapted from the 
original of William Wycherley by Mr. Augustin Daly. The 
cast will include Mr. George Webster as Squire Moody; Mr. 
White Whittlesey as Dick Belville; Mr. Edwin Emery as 
Ned Harcourt; Mr. Lucius Henderson as Sparkish; Mr. 
frank Bacon as Old Will; Agnes Ranken as Alithea; and 
Marie Howe as Lucy. 

* * * 

"Under Two Flags" has another week to run at the Colum- 
bia Theatre, the engagement coming to a close on Saturday 
night, July 20th. The final performance will take place 
on next Saturday night, July 20th. Following "Under Two 
Flags" on Monday night, July 22d, comes the representative 
Irish comedian, Mr. Chauncey Olcott, in "Garrett O'Magh," 
by Mr. Augustus Pitou. His new play is laid in 1812, and the 
war with England serves as a bit of interest in the telling 
of the story. 

* * * 

The orpheum offers a strong bill for next week. Cheval- 
ier Enrico Mario Scognanillo is a 'cellist. Etta Butler will 
appear for one week only and it will De her farewell week in 
vaudeville. Damm Brothers are acrobats and hail from 
Europe. Charles Leonard Fletcher is a monologist. 
* * * 

"The Babes in the Wood" will continue at the Tivoli with 
new songs and "topics" until July 29th, when the Grand 
Opera season will open with "Aida." 



Mrs. Terry, Mrs. Kendall, Adelina Patti and many others 
use and endorse Camelline for the complexion. It keeps the 
skin bright and clear and counteracts the effects of the 
wind and sun. You will find it the very best. 



The Cafe Zinkand is society's headquarters. After the 
theatre the best people in town go there to listen to the ex- 
cellent music and have supper. Good wine, good food, and 
good music have made the Zinkand a favorite. 



When you call for Argonaut Whiskey you proclaim your- 
self a connoisseur. It has that smooth, oily consistency and 
elegant bouquet that are the characteristics of good whis- 
key, and leaves none of the bad effects that cheap goods do. 
Take some with you when you go camlping. E. Martin & Co., 
54 First street, sole agents for the United States. 

Instead of buying a new suit of clothes send your old ones 
to Spaulding's Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment, 127 
Stockton street. Goods called for and delivered and satis- 
faction guaranteed. They also clean gloves, neckties, cur- 
tains, tapestries, and all such articles. You will find it a 
money-saving proposition to patronize them. 



Columbia Theatre. B - M "- }£2L?£k—. 

POI'RTII .n.l LAM UF.KK. Ilr«ln. Ne.l Hoofer. < harln 
l-rohmin a rrral production, l.jr arrangement wllh narlll 
Itolaaco. 

UNDER TWO FLAGS 

Pool M 1'oltcr'. imam founded on Oulda'n novel. Wllh 

BLANCHE BATES as CIGARETTE 

IjwI lime Saturday night, .Inly JO. 

July ■— OBAtmon OlOOTT, In "Garret O'Magh.** 



Tivoli Opera Mouse. ^"SSTOSKEU. 

Monday, July 15th. Third Big Week. The Jolly Summertime 
Extravaganza, 

BABES IN THE WOOD 

By Ferris Hurt man. Bigger and Brighter than Ever I A Mine 
of Mirth find Son*. Latest Topics of the Day- 
Monday. July 29— Opening of the GRAND OPERA SEASON. 
Evenings at 8. Matinee Saturday al 2. 
Popular prices— 25 and 50 cents. Telephone Bush 9. 



Orph 



. San Francisco's Greatest Musto Hall. 

C U m . O'Farrell St.. between Stockton and Powell streets. 

Enrico Mario Scognamillo. Etta Butler. Damm Bros. Chas. 
Leonard Fletcher. Prosper Troupe. Gilbert <fe Goldte, Arras & 
Alice. Irving Jones. The Blograph. 

Reserved Seats 25o.: balcony 10o.; opera chairs and box seats. 50, 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 



QL,.,,- TL-.l _ _ Bklasco A Thall. Managers. 

mcazar I neatre. phone Main 2m 

Commencing: Monday, July 15th. 

FLORENCE ROBERTS 

Supported by White Whittlesey and Alcazar Stook Company 
will present Augustin Daly's version of Wyeherley's Famous 
Comedy In Three Acts. 

THE COUNTRY GIRL 

Seats six days in advance. Only Matinee— Saturday- 



After the Theatre 



Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the finest 

wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zinkand Is society's gathering place after the theatre 

over. 



Valuable 

Papers 

Lost_^z> 



Can rarely be replaced. 
Why, then, run the 
risk of losing yours, 
when you can rent a 
Safe Deposit Box for 
their safe-keeping at $5 
a year from the 



CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT 
AND TRUST COMPANY, 

COR. CALIFORNIA & MONTGOMERY STS., 
San Francisco, California. 



"I've prescribed 
enough . . . 



Bethesda 



to swim in." 



—Dr. Shbady, 274 Lexington avenue. New York 
L. CAHEN & SON, Agents, Wholesale Liqu»r Dealers, 

Send tor Pamphle ' »18 Sacramento Street. 

DR. REGENSBERGER 

900 B Powell Street. 

Telephone 1396. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



fjiy 13, 1901. 




The majority of the people one meets are 

Arrows of the mediocre and uninteresting, half the 

Almighty. books one reads are uninteresting and 

mediocre. "Arrows of the Almighty" cer- 
tainly does not belong to the other half. It is by Owen John- 
son, dealing with events taking place in Maryland and 
Ohio during the time preceding, and including, the Civil 
War. The young man at whom so many tragic arrows of 
fate are aimed is an American aristocrat by the name of 
Yaunt. His father is addicted to the vices of gambling and 
atheism, which darken his early life. His mother dies, later 
his father, his fortune disappears, the girl whom he thinks 
he loves goes out of his life; the man he trusted proves 
false; he meets a charming young girl, marries her, and in 
time she goes insane, her reason being resurrected in the 
last chapter. These are the bald facts of his life, but mean- 
while his character is developing sadly but surely. In fact, 
the book is steeped in a refined and unbrightened melan- 
choly. A certain pace taken at the beginning is kept up 
to the end, but it is not a thrilling pace. There is an abund- 
ance of sentiment and very little humor. Yet the characters 
are well conceived and the realism sufficient. Were it not 
for its lack of cheerfulness we should be inclined to say the 
book was as entertaining reading as most of the novels of 
the day. But the arrows arising thick and fast, the hero 
has no time to smile. The women he loves are well drawn, 
instinct with life. One is a fiery-souled Southern girl, bril- 
liant, beautiful, over self-confident, losing him through the 
very arts she is at such pains to use to capture him: the 
other, a less dashing, more tranquil-mannered, more sympa- 
thetic and less restless creature, who is properly shocked at 
his inherited atheistic tendencies. The lack in the book 
seems to be one rather of stamina than of material, and the 
want of sufficient plot causes it to amble. It is long, how- 
ever, full of natural dialogue, and maintains throughout 
its well-bred air of melancholy. Published by The Macniil- 
lan Company. 

"Robert Annys, Poor Priest: A Tale of 
Robert Annys. the Great Uprising," is a late book by 

Annie Nathan Meyer. The scenes are 
laid in England during the time of John Wyclif, and Robert 
Annys is among his followers, russet-clad, poor, walking 
from place to place, and preaching anywhere— but in 
churches. His first temptation to leave his work among the 
ignorant, common people comes when the Bishop of Ely gives 
him the opportunity to preach in the great cathedral, after- 
wards offering him a high place in the Diocese. He contin- 
ues, however, his meetings in the market places, and, believ- 
ing in marriage, becomes engaged to a saintly young girl. 
His second temptation finds him out when he meets this? 
girl's cousin, a far less godly and far more beautiful damsel, 
who immediately arouses in him an unquenchable passion. 
Unable tp overcome it or to find comfort longer with his be- 
trothed, he wanders away, fighung the tempter within him, 
which grows stronger at every sight of the girl's face. At 
length he is driven for safety into a monastery, and 
straight back into the arms of the church, against which he 
had been preaching. The girl meanwhile is enjoying a brief 
career as the mistress of a Marquis, while the poor priest's 
former fiancee awaits him in vain. The book ends with one 
of the innumerable uprisings of the poor against the rich. 
It is all rather uninteresting as to incident, but sympathetic 
in style. The characters are mere types and outlines, the 
scenes stereotyped, and the force of the tale lies entirely in 
the power of emotion displayed. Robert Annys successfully 
living down his temptations in the refuge of the monastery, 
yet coming forth at the time of the uprising to the aid of his 
people, is a noble but pitiable figure. The Bishop is the 
strongest type in the book. Brought out by The Macmillan 
Company. 



George Cary Eggleston's experiences in the 
A Carolina Civil War, on the Confederate side, as 
Cavalier. embodied in "A Rebel's Recollections," 

are still fresh in the minds of many read- 
ers. He told feelingly, but without any bitterness, the story 
of the sufferings of the Southern soldiers and the no less 
trying ordeals of hope and disappointment through which 
tiie women of the South passed during those troublous 
times. Again it is a story of the South that Mr. Eggleston 
gives us. but of the South of over a century ago. "A Carolina 
Cavalier" is an exceptionally good Revolutionary romance, 
written in the author's peculiarly direct and vigorous style. 
U can but add to the literary laurels which Mr. Eggleston 
has won through his picturesque sketches of Western and 
Southwestern life. It deals with events in the Carolinas dur- 
ing the British invasion of 1780, at the time when Marion 
and Rutiedge and a small body of patriots were so bravely 
holding the enemy at bay. Patriotism and an unflinching 
sense of honor, love and heroic devotion, are the themes 
chosen by the writer, and ably does he illustrate these high 
virtues and portray the sentiments and spirit of the heroic 
people among whom the story is laid. The old time cour- 
tesy of the South, the boundless hospitality, the high en- 
tieavor, the enthusiasm and self-sacrifice of the men and 
women, is well brought out, and from first to last the whole 
atmosphere of the period so far removed from that of our 
commercial age is admirably sustained. The historic events 
of the troublous times which Mr. Eggleston uses for a 
background lend themselves readily to strong dramatic 
effects. Overrun by Cornwallis's merciless hordes, scourged 
by the faith-breaking, treacherous cut-throat, Tarleton, and 
his legion of drilled and disciplined savages, subjected to the 
torch of Tory incendiaries, the Carolinans realized that 
there was no safety for them except that which they could 
secure by their own right arms. The ceaseless, though ir- 
regular war, which they waged at this time when South 
Carolina had become a hornet's nest, Mr. Eggleston depicts 
with ability and vivacity. The book is, however, cot only 
roteworiny as a valuable addition to our country's history of 
that period, but it also makes entertaining reading for those 
who prefer to read of love rather than of war. Two stories 
of true love, the courses of which run proverbially far from 
smooth, furnish the lighter motifs of this very commendable 
historical romance. 

"Carolina Cavalier." Lothrop Publishing Co., Boston. 
Price, $1.50. 

An authorized translation of Georges 
In Deep Abyss. Ohnet's "In Deep Abyss," has recently 
been made by Fred Rothwell, B. A. 
This new novel by the author of "The Ironmaster" is a 
sensational story of love and intrigue, the scenes of which 
are laid in Paris, San Francisco, and elsewhere. Jacques 
de Fn'neuse, a young Frenchman, is wrongfully accused 
of the murder of a woman, and banished to Noumea. The 
plot turns on the frightful fate of the poor victim whose 
guilt is violently affirmed and who, proclaiming himself 
innocent, has no means of proving it. The French novelist 
undoubtedly had the famous Dreyfus affair in mind. The 
falibility of human judgment "even in those whose pro- 
fession it is to pass sentence and consequently in a position 
to boast of special experience," and the possibility of legal 
error, are the main points of a very melodramatic story. 
The rehabilitation of Jacques de Freneuse, and the downfall 
of his enemies, after a bewildering series of plots and 
counterplots, fill the four hundred odd pages of a book in 
which the characters and scenes are typically Gallic. 

Funk & Wagnalls Co., Publishers, New York. Price 
$1.20 net. 



Polite and attentive service, good food and wines, and 
delightful music are some of the attractive features of the 
Techau Tavern. Drop in after the theatre. 



BOOKS REVIEWED IN THIS PAPER 
Can be Obtained at 



Robertson's 



126 Post Street 



-uly 13, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




An agonizing cry Is heard 

From many a parching throat. 
Since 'tis decreed no bar shall be 

Upon the Oakland boat. 

The poor commuter on the dei I. 

Will stand and wonder why 
The dancing San Francisco bay 

Can look so very dry. 

Then on the poet's thirsty rhyme 
Hell be compelled to think — 
Water, water everywhere. 
Nor any drop to drink V 

Does anyone seriously believe tor a moment that the late 
bemoaned statute tor the closing of the side entrances si 
to embarrass, even for a moment, the saloon keepers and the 
i.aughty prowlers by night for whom those very side en- 
trances were designed and executed? If there is any of you 
BO simple-minded, the Crier invites you to take a stroll with 
him just a few blocks up Ellis. Eddy, or O'Farrell streets, 
and we will see what we can see. Do you notice those nice, 
innocent-looking doors, closing demurely on the street, and 
each bearing a tempting brass plate explaining how there 
is a first-class cafe' within where one can get no end of rare 
uelicacies at all hours? These cafes, so called by courtesy 
of the police, are no more or less than the once-familiar side- 
entrances, just as convenient as of yore. I have in mind 
one of these blind pigs on Ellis street. It leads into the Ma- 
jestic saloon. I believe. If you have been a frequenter of the 
side entrances of olden times the sight within will make you 
homesick. The "cafe"' dodge Is not convenient for some sa- 
loons, which, however, have built passages from innocent- 
looking restaurants next door. While I think of it. I might 
ask what is the use of the statute which provides that por- 
tieres only shall be hung across the doorways of restaurant 
boxes? Most of the restaurants which have hung the por- 
tieres according to law have provided them with fastenings 
on both sides so strong and so ingenious as to make of the 
seemingly fragile drapery a barrier twice as strong as an 
ordinary door. 

And while I am dwelling on that sort of thing, I might sug- 
gest that the police reap a plentiful harvest in the same 
savory district along the open cigar stands, which so plenti- 
fully dot the locality. These booths have become both un- 
lovely and dangerous of late, due to the nature of the gentry 
who frequent them. Race track touts, cappers, heelers, 
unemployed waiters, prize-fighters, vagrants, pool-room hang- 
ers-on — in fact, the whole circle of the flashily-dressed, the 
ogle-eyed, the hair-oiled — making it positively unsafe for un- 
escorted women to pass at any hour. In the old days before 
the Baldwin Hotel went up in smoke the cheap but danger- 
ous mashers hung about the bar and billiard tables of the 
Powell-street hostelry, but of late there has been an over- 
flow into the street. It would be nice to take the Chinatown 
squad off Jackson street and put them on Ellis street for 
a week, where they may learn that the yellow gambler and 
highbinder are gentlemen by comparison. 

Some enterprising individual has conceived the scheme 
of illuminating the Yosemite Valley. This vandal wants 
strings of electric lights hanging from the domes and 
Bridal Veil Falls turned into an- electric fountain. The Criev 
suggests a trolley line through the air from crag to crag. 
Then a big pool might be dug at the foot of the Falls, and a 
"chute the chutes" put in. Open up a vaudeville house, 
too, with a continuous performance, and make special rates 
to Sunday picnic parties. Hera all the animals into a zoo. 
The News Letter will send a commissioner out to catch 
an elephant. Yosemite has been too dignified — loosen things ' 
up a bit, 



Due (presumably) to his Itlon and high repute 

tor wisdom th' ■ many crank 

■lis tool question! thai to do 

n» his r.iir colleague, Mrs Blla Wilier Win 

mi. i open a departmenl o( general Information. Bona "f the 

ire humorous, some are pathetic, 
othei r . : t < ■ r 1 1 1 1 >• malicious and ii:i>" in their purpose 

demand an answer. Laal week, for instance, there was 
mailed t" me a little scented note from .v m. C., asking if I 

WOOld nol expose an alleged dark blOl In the history of a 

talented actress in this city, Whether the writer is some 

ni cirl aspiring to the Joo of Miss , whom I I 

nely attacks, or whether the note was written from de- 
pravity Simple and Impure, 1 cannot say; hut this I will say 
fur the hem-lit of A M C. and her ilk. The Crier is not in 
business to Bllng slime or spread scandal. He loves to uphold 

ist and upbraid the iniquitous. He delights In twirling 
his whip, and that right merrily, thauks to the existence of 
A M. C. and those of her calibre; but scandal for scandal's 
sake — never. 

Honest, Mr. Homer Davenport ought not to do it. There 
may be money in it, but it's a shame to pocket the coin. 
During campaign times, when he made those keg-bellied, 
bull-necked ogres and labeled tnem "The Trusts," his friends 
used to say "Poor Homer, he can do better than that, but it's 
rart of the trade, you know." But now that he has taken 
to report prize-fight-wrestling matches, even his friends 
are turning a whale-back on him. Witness his rhetoric: 
"It sounded like an old lady making butter" — "till he looked 
like a Swede in love" — "till Billy Maddern looked restless" — 
"until he looked like a man holding down Dolly Varden 
trout" — "till it looked as if Bob would win" — "till some of the 
blacksmith's friends feared it would shift his voice" — "till 
it looked as though the lion-tamer was a winner." All these 
threaded together in the space of two paragraphs "till it 
looked like" a string of imitation pearls. No, Mr. Davenport's 
friends ought not to let him do it. 

The San Rafael baby farm of John Biter may not be 
as bad as ic is painted. It can gain considerable in the tell- 
ing and still remain foul enough to warrant a feathery over- 
coat for the male and female who conduct it. The burglar 
is sometimes a hero, the tramp often has certain redeeming 
qualities lurking beneath the fifth substratum of dirt, the 
bunco man generally gets no more than he deserves to take 
away and his victim deserves to lose; but the creatures 
who deal in the bodies of those wretched children whose 
only fault and only misfortune lies in the accident of their 
birth — what shall we say of ihem, what shall we do to them? 
No one has ever decried mob violence more loudly than have 
I. but I must confess that there are times when the law is 
slower, less satisfying, and less accurate than a good rope 
in the hands of the many. 

In view of the manner in wnich a Coroner's jury across 
the bay has recently dealt out a gentlemanly assault and 
battery verdict against Rev. Mr. Adams, who cold-bloodedly 
shot down Dr. Jessup, it is refreshing to note that the jury 
which sat under Coroner Leland on the ease of Robert 
G. Wilson, who killed little Maggie Hartwell, did not stand 
any monkeying with. Wilson's act was a damnably atrocious 
thing (in the parlance of the Prosecuting Attorney). If as 
good a jury as sat in the Coroner's chambers will sit in the 
Criminal Court when Wilson's trial is on, the Crier trusts 
that one child-slayer at least will be hanged as high as the 
law allows, despite the shameful precedent of the notorious 
Brandes case. 

What's in a name? Governor Savage, of Nebraska, went, 
accompanied by his staff, to see a bull-fight in Omaha, Wed- 
nesday evening. Efforts were made to induce him to stay- 
away, but true to his name, he went. Heredity, most 
likely. Probably in some dim and bye-gone age an ances- 
tor of this Governor distinguished himself by some particu- 
larly savage deed, and the name was given him that has de- 
scended to this Governor of Nebraska, who lent his sanction 
to the cruel sports that have been going on in Omaha for 
several days past. The preachers of Omaha saw the fight, 
too — but they went to get subjects for Sunday sermons. 
That's what they said, anyway — and who so bold as to doubt 
them? 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 13, 1901. 



;:*sssi 



Looker On 



mm—m 




North Hall and South Hall, the two famous old buildings 
of the Berkeley campus, have been painted a most beautiful 
lurid red. Now, the Berkeley flag is blue and gold, and the 
Stanford flag is red; so according to the accepted theory 
of what a university should look like, these buildings should 
have been striped with blue and gold. There is a story 
afloat in university circles — a story so cold from the tem- 
perate zone of truth, so void of the nobility of noble men — 
that moral students pass it about in whispers and only the 
brazen ones talk it together aloud. Here it is as told by a 
college wag: 

On ihe last Thanksgiving Day, when the two rival armies 
stood swathed in padded armor and helmeted in dried pig- 
skin soaked in a solution of iron, the President of Stanford 
University approached the President of the University of 
California. 

"Ben," he said, "we're goin' to win." 

"Bet cha!" said the boss of the California gang. 

"I ain't got nothing," replied Jordan. "I spent all my 
money hshin' last Saturday. But I'll bet you my ticket home, 
and whoever loses has to walk." 

"Huh!" said Wheeler; "you'd like to see me doin' the 
tread-water act across the Day. I'll bet you and you can owe 
it to me." 

"I owe half my hired men now," said Jordan. Then, "I'll 
tell you what I'll do," he added with sudden inspiration, "if 
I lose I'll paint my house blue and gold, and if you lose you 
paint your house red." 

"I ain't got no house," Wheeler replied; "I'm living on the 
State." 

"How about some of your college buildings?" urged the 
sly President of the Cardinal. 

"Done!" said Wheeler. "Shake!" 

After the game the two presidents met in the middle of 
the field. 

"Well, Ben," said Dave, "I'll be mixin' the paint to-night." 

"Give me time," pleaded Ben. "Give me six months so that 
they won't suspect. If they founu out, I'd lose my job." 

"All right," said Jordan, "but in that case, I put the first 
stripes on." It was agreed, and that night as the clock 
struck twelve, President Jordan, who had been invited over 
to President Wheeler's for the evening, slipped out into the 
moonlight with a bucket of red paint and traced three long 
stripes of red down the side of old North Hall. Those stripes 
remained a mystery for a long time, but they did not begin to 
equal the consternation that flurried the little bay city when 
the rest of the building and the South Hall as well were 
swept into a brilliant cardinal that now glistens gold-col- 
ored in the setting sun. 



You can blame it to fate or you can blame it to what you 
durn please, but I say unto you that it was a strange co- 
incident that brought Miss Blanche Bates and her very dear 
enemy, Miss Mary Van Buren, together last Sunday, as the 
mascots of the Poison Oak and the Little Neck Clam society 
baseball teoms who struggled for supremacy on a Blithesdale 
side-hill. But if you are a careful reader of the dailies, you 
have doubtless decided by now that the possible renewal of 
the ancient Bates-Van Buren feud was not all that happened 
at that memorable contest of brawn. In fact the reporters 
who dished up the event for the dailies seemed to be in 
league with that cussed fate which brought the twain to- 
gether; for they got Miss Van Buren and Miss Bates mixed, 
and reported them as mascots for the wrong teams. Miss 
Bates held the magic skin for the Little Neck Clams and not 
for the dangerous botanists from Blithesdale, as the Exami- 
ner and others had it. The reason for this curious mistake 
was that the Frohman star persisted in herding with the 
Poison Oak contingent where she did not belong, so how 
were the poor reporters to know? If Miss Bates had stuck 
a little tighter to her team, say certain disgruntled bivalves 



from Belvedere, the history of the day might not have read 
so cheerfully for the fair but poisonous shrubs from Blithes- 
dale. I hope that this is the true reason for the defeat of 
Miss Bates' pets, for it is the farthest from my wishes to 
accuse the Frohman star of being a hoodoo. 

* • • 

With her usual eye to business, 
Mrs. Dorothy McKeown, 
Seeking justice in divorce courts, 
Is again in town. 

Managers she has and houses, 

Now the next to come of course. 

By the rules of the profession. 
Is a stage divorce. 

Dorothy, Dorothy, I've been thinking 
You'd have shown a deal more tact 

If you'd got a few divorces 
Ere you tried to act. 

* • • 

This is a fish story. 

Mr. I. W. Hellman has recently bought a large tract of 
ground on the shores of Lake Tahoe. Mr. Hellman is believed 
by many to be the richest man in California, and he is one 
of the wealthiest Hebrews in the United States. Consequent- 
ly his residence, it is stated, is to be a marvel of beauty. 
One of the chief inducements offered Mr. Hellman at Tahoe 
was the fine fishing the lake affords. For many years the 
banker has angled there and he takes just pride in his 
skill. 

Last summer he went out with a boatman and caught what 
seemed to be a very large trout. Mr. Hellman was enthu- 
siastic over its beauty and size. He exclaimed to his com- 
I anion: 

"John, if that fish weighs ten pounds I will give you ten 
dollars." 

Mr. Hellman caught others that day, but his pride was cen- 
tered in the first. When he went back to land he was happy. 
The fisherman departed to weigh the big catch. He returned 
jubilant. The fish weighed ten pounds and a half. 

The capitalist himself was hilarious and desired to see 
the (ish weighed. He gave the man ten dollars and a half, 
a dollar for every pound. Mr. Hellman was an event and 
the envy of all the fishermen. The chef was asked to cook 
this oanner fish with especial care. It was delicious, but its 
memory grew less sweet when the chef asked Mr. Hellman 
if he nad shot the fish. 

"Shot him!" exclaimed the banker. "Are you joking? 
Indeed, no. He just walked right up to my fly and bit like 
a gentleman." 

"I only wanted to know," answered the chef. "There 
seemed to be a pound of shot in him." 

Mr. Hellman thought of John's first disappearance, and the 
ten dollars and a half. None of his friends who ate the 
lish heard the story; consequently he remains the hero of 
the fishing set, but he offers no more prizes for heavy trout. 

* • • 

You have probably all read the story of the gentlemanly 
burglar who entered the sacred seclusion of a Jackson- 
street lady's chamber last week, and in a manner befitting 
;. Beau Brummel or a Ward McAllister, relieved the lady of 
the house of a few much-needed dollars? When the well- 
gioomed plunderer left the house he shook hands all around 
and took occasion-to remark: "If you would keep your doors 
and windows locked, you wouldn't be troubled with burg- 
lars. Good-night, madam." The chivalrous wight might 
have gone a little further and advised the occupants of the 
house to leave their stray belongings in a California Safe 
Deposit vault. This course is positively the only thoroughly 
safe plan when the burglar burgs and the cop sleeps around 
the corner. 



Tbiists and combinations do not effect Jesse Mnore Whiskey. Its fume 
is established. Its qunlity is the finest and it is always the best- 



WANTED— Pupils in embroidery, battenbur?, point lace nnd all lino 
needlework. Highest testimonials. Samples shown. 50c for afternoon. 
1613 B Sutter Street, San Francisco. 



St. Louis A. B. C. Beer, Pure, Pale and Sparkling, the king 
of all bottled Beers. 



July 13, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



BUBBLES FROM &/>e SWIM. 



By Lady Algy. 

"Introduce me to the little French girl, pll 
of the I'riin M who is at present showing Dl how 
ought not to be handled. The little French girl 
< arroll. chattering nimbly in Preach. It would be hard to 
make a Parisian believe that this young lady is a hon 

md related to the Murphys at that. Her French la t ti-- 
leal thing. She has acquired large chunks of it at n fancy 
price per chunk. Not that it is entirely a recent acquisition, 
for like all society girls. Gertie learned to do the polite in 
1 rench along with all the other parlor tricks girls must ac- 
quire. But the last few months she has been devoting her- 
self assiduously to the intricacies of the language. Palnl 
heart ne'er conquered French verb, and this fair lady has 
-vorked hard. 

"Ahem! says Mrs. Grundy, significantly, and lorgnettes 
the placid, gilt-haired gentleman who wears the fez of the 
Turkish Sultan and rolls his English like a dyed-in-the-wool 
Frenchman. "That's going to be a match," decide the gos- 
sips, who will not have it that a mere common interest in 
a foreign language brings these two together so often. 
Of course Gertie Carroll could find no one better quali- 
fed to practice French with than the much be-medaled 
Consul who lived in la belle France before he became the 
friend of his Sultanic Majesty. I sincerely hope that rumor 
is not awry, for I should like to see Gertie happily married. 
She is devotedly attached to her sister, and since Mrs. Whit- 
tier has forsaken the giddy whirl of things social Gertie has 
been hibernating and — studying French — conjugating "aime" 
a deux. 

* * • 

I have been rather amused at the statements of various 
claimants for the honor of having first announced the engage- 
ment of Miss Huntington. I refer the several scribes to the 
back numbers of the News Letter and suggest back seats 
for them as well — at least as far as that society scoop is con- 
cerned. 

• * « 

The accusation that Mrs. Scott brought out one imported 
bridesmaids' hat from New York and had the others copied 
by a cheap milliner, is as ridiculous as it is untrue. The 
hats were all made by the most expensive milliner in San 
F'rancisco, who was given carte blanche, just as was the mo- 
diste who fashioned the bridesmaids' gowns. The gowns 
and hats were ordered here, not to save expense, but to in- 
sure satisfaction. It would have been no easy matter to have 
the orders executed on forms — the result would doubtless 
nave been badly fitting gowns and unbecoming hats. ' As it 
was, the ensemble was perfect. 

The bride herself was sorry at the last moment 
that she had the wedding gown made in New York instead of 
out here. It arrived only the day before the wedding, and 
while it was a magnificent gown, it did not fit nearly as well 
as though she had been there herself for the last fitting. 
The gown was cut Princess style, which flaunts every fault 
in fit. A dressmaker was hurriedly summoned to Burliugstme 
on the very morning of the wedding to hastily smooth out 
the wrinkles. Despite her efforts many sharp eyes spied the 
rlaws. Mary Scott was the only cool one in the room while 
the modiste was twisting and turning and pinning the gown. 
"Walter won't know the difference between a gunny sack 
and a queen's robe, and I don't care about the others," was 
the pretty tribute the self-possessed young woman paid him 
just as the wedding march floated out. 



Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 
cares poison oak and all skin diseases. Sold by all druggists. 



Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. 

Cooper & Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 



Why experiment -with other brands when you can get Jesse Moore 
Whiskey at all times and places ? 



St. Louis A. B. C. Beer, Pure, Pale and sparkling, the king 
of all Bottled Beers. 



Pears' 

It is a wonderful 
that takes hold quick and 
docs no harm. 

No harm! It loaves the 
skin soft like a baby's; no 
alkali in it, nothing but 
soap. The harm is done by 
alkali. Still more harm is 
done by not washing. So, 
bad soap is better than 
none. 

What is bad soap? Im- 
perfectly made; the fat 
and alkali not well bal- 
anced or not combined. 

What is good soap? 
Pears'. 

All sorts of stores sell It, especially drujjgJsts; 
al: sorts of people use it. ' 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Ophir Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — San Francisco. Cal. Location of 
works. Virginia Mining District. Storey County. Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 9th day of July, 1901. an assessment (No. 01) of Fifteen (i5) Cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable Im- 
mediately in United States gold coin to the secretary, at the office of the 
company, room 50, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street. San Francisco 
California 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 13th DAY OF AUGUST. 1901, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless pay- 
ment is made before, will be sold on MOND\Y. the 2nd day of 
September, 1901, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost 
of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors , 

B. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 

Office— Room 50. Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 



SEND 10 CENTS FOR 

KORN 

PATENT t 
SOFT HAT J 
CREASE ? 
HOLDER | 

Will retain Bhape and 
crease in any soft hat. 

KORN THE HATTER, 726 Market St., S. F., Cal. 

"A Genuine Old Brandy made front Wine. 

— Medical Press {London), Aug. 1899 

MARTELLS 
THREE STAR 
BRANDY 

AT ALL RESORTS AND RESTAURANTS 

WILLIAM WOLFF & CO., san francisco 
Pacific Coast Agents 




12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 13, 1901. 




Notwithstanding the dull condition which 

The Pine-St. prevails on Pine street, there are many 

Market. who still believe that the time is not far 

distant when a change may be expected for 
the better. To those who view the situation from a disinter- 
ested standpoint, there is a reason for the lack of life in the 
market. The attention of the management has for many 
months past been solely directed and absorbed by the better- 
ment of the conditions on the lode, to the modernization of 
machinery, and the material reduction of the mechanical 
utilities. This, of course, it can be readily understood, has 
entailed the disposition of all the financial resources at 
command, without hampering or interfering with the more 
important work in hand by devoting time and money to 
stock manipulation. Naturally, speculators on the curb, 
who live by collecting their assessments on short sales, paid 
by the legitimate operators on the long side of the market, 
do not like this state of affairs, and grumbling is in order, as 
might be expected. They have come to regard themselves 
as alone worthy of consideration, and take the action of 
the manipulators in not raising values so that they can sell 
them down as a personal outrage. Were there a way to 
starve this class off the street altogether, it would be better 
for the market and for the stockholders of the mines. They 
are the drones who live and thrive off the working bees. 
It is from them that all the complaints about alleged mis- 
management and other important evils of the working sys- 
tem arise, in an effort to kill the business, if possible, en- 
tirely, so that they can profit by the ruin of innocent holders 
of the shares. It is noteworthy that several of these blood- 
suckers have managed to fatten on the wreck and ruin which 
has been brought about on the street through their malig- 
nant agency. They are able to sport fine linen and broad- 
cloth at the expense of the holders of Comstock shares by a 
system of operations which few men with a conscience or 
self-respect would care to engage in, or be willing, at any 
rate, to be pointed out in the connection. There has been 
more dirty work done on Pine street during the past two 
years by this band of wreckers than ever could be laid at the 
door of the wild-cat manipulators in days gone by. In the 
meantime, if disorganization does prevail temporarily on 
the Exchanges, the mechanical situation on the Comstock 
has been improved immensely, and the after-effect of this 
is bound to develop sooner or later, when those who have 
stood the brunt of the expense and hard times may get their 
dues. Little is to be said of the market conditions during the 
past week. Prices have see-sawed to some extent along the 
share list, with a better tone in one quarter at one moment 
and then in another. The southends have shown some 
strength of late. The regular dividend of 10 cents, No. 43, 
has been paid by Con.-Cal.-Virginia, and an assessment or 
3 5 cents has been levied by Ophir. That is about the only 
news of the week. 

The financial writers of the morning 
The Local Stock press disposed of the Equitable Gas- 
Market, light company entirely to their own sat- 
isfaction during the holiday interval, 
and stockholders in consequence returned to town full of 
the fairy tale, ready to turn over their shares for the $6.50 
which they were told was waiting for them on demand. They 
are doing the waiting now. The stock struggled weakly up 
to 5 bid one morning, and then quietly settle back to the 
neighborhood of 414, where it was before the street rumor 
found expression in print. The property has been bonded 
for the amount stated, not sold, but it may be within 90 days, 
the time for which the contract holds good. If not, the com- 
pany will be richer by $20,000 now on deposit to bind the con- 
tract, and the stock will likely do as well on its own merits 
as though the sale had taken place. If it does go through the 
fact is apt to develop that the purchasers are nearer home 



than the locality from which the alleged purchaser is said 
to hail. The Equitable is able to stand on its own legs now, 
and for this reason it has been and would be a thorn in some 
people's sides here, so its eventual absorption is assured. 
Until the deal is accomplished it is not likely that any one 
is likely to pay the full $6.50 for other people's stock, or 
at least until there is some certainty that there will be no 
hitch in the proceedings. On the other hand, holders are not 
likely to sacrifice their stock at present figures, with the pos- 
sibility of eventually getting $6.50. The balance of the mar- 
ket has been weak in the investment list, with a moderate 
run of transactions. Stocks have been fairly active and 
firm. 

With the prevailing dullness in the 

The Oil Exchanges local financial situation the market 

Quiet. for oil shares is in full sympathy. 

Both Exchanges still keep open for 
business, but the volume is infinitely small. However, there 
is no reason to imagine from this that the business is going 
to drop out of sight entirely. On the contrary, the better 
stocks such as Caribou, Peerless, San Joaquin, Sterling, Inde- 
pendence, and two or three others are a safe investment at 
present prices. They may go a little lower perhaps, but there 
is merit behind them, and a reaction ultimately is certain. 
The present decline did not steal upon those interested in 
the business unawares. It was brought about by a variety 
of causes, not the most significant of them being the rascal- 
ity which is gradually developing in the management of out- 
side wild-cat companies. The Exchange should not of course 
be held responsible for conditions of the kind outside their 
jurisdiction, but still the effect is far-reaching, and in up- 
setting public confidence it naturally reacted upon the listed 
stocks as well. The atmosphere will clear up before long, 
and the first indication of this happy event will be demon- 
strated by a rise in the price of such listed investment as 
those named. It would help, naturally, if both the Ex- 
changes would insist upon the companies listed thereon 
complying with the law of the State, in regard to publishing 
;i monthly statement of their financial condition. They should 
either do this or be dropped from the list, and the public 
should in no case invest a dollar in the stock of any com- 
pany which refuses to obey the law which requires a sworn 
statement of its receipts and expenditures and its financial 
standing on the first of every month. If some of the contu- 
macious individuals filling the position of President and 
Secretary of an oil company get hauled into court by a share- 
holder with stamina enough to demand his rights, they may 
find to their cost which is the more powerful, they or 
the law of the State. There has been enough of child's play 
in the management of a great many of those concerns, and 
it is high time the officials in charge were taught what 
their business is, if they do not know it. Shareholders have 
some rights in the company as well as themselves. 

State Mineralogist Lewis E. Aubury 

Work of the has returned from a visit to San Diego 

Mining Bureau. County, where he has been engaged in 

looking into the oil and copper de- 
posits, and arranging for the compilation of an official min- 
ing map of that section. He reports that salt water was 
struck at a depth of 160 feet in the Barrett well, which is be- 
ing sunk in the Carrizo Creek district. It is now very warm 
in that section, the mercury ranging from 108 degrees to 
122 degrees. A number of outfits are drilling there. Field 
Assistant P. C. DuBois has returned from the inspection of 
Nevada, Plumas, Lassen and Modoc Counties, where he has 
been occupied in looking up the copper deposits, and will 
proceed in a few days to Mariposa County and work north 
through the counties of Tuolumne, Calaveras, Amador, El 
Dorado, and Placer, and inspect the copper possibilities. 
Field Assistant J. H. Tibbits, who has been investigating the 
county of Humboldt and western portion of Trinity, will pro- 
ceed to Lake County in a few days. Stephen Bowers is still 
employed at Carrizo Creek, San Diego County, on oil forma- 
tions. Many samples of copper ores are being sent in by the 
Assistants from the various properties inspected by them, 
and are being placed on exhibition in the museum. Mr. 
George A. Tweedy has finished the counties of l.iono, Inyo, 
and Alpine, and will proceed to Southern California to finish 
his investigations. 



July IS, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



13 



Tlw Beattle kilning Record drops a 
Highfjiulm' Catch timely hint lo Investors who m.. 

Penniea. tin lined to believe all the] t- ad In the 

80-mu.li a llnr nils whli h now appeal 
of million-dollar coal, coppei ami gold schemea In th.- North- 
west. — 'Washington mining Ini 

are receiving a block eye at the hamls of certain I 
htoi k-orokers who are guilty of the groat 
in their endeavor to sell mining shares. Their advertisements 
of mining propositions fairly bristle with misstatements 
that cannot but eventuate disastrously to the mining Indus- 
try of this State. While these exaggerations may fool 
nt girls and $U a week factory hands into buying mining 
shares at an exorbitant figure they have a directly opposite 
effect jra big capitalists. It needs only a glance at t!i 
sounding advertisements of tnese conscienceless 
to demonstrate the fraudulent character of the statements 
lound therein." People with money who are ready to jump 
at every gilded bait, should remember "all is not gold that 
glitters." and be advised in time. The owners of bona fide 
bonanza properties like these appear on paper, do not ad- 
vertise the fact. Bear that in mind. 

A rather important improvement 
High-Grade Ores of was reported during the past week 
Eastern Oregon. in the Homestake mine of Eastern 
Oregon, mention of which was 
made in an article on the mineral wealth of that section of 
the west in our issue of June 29th. Enquiry at the office 
of the company at No. 601 California street in this city, re- 
sulted in the confirmation of the report, although the man- 
agement did not express surprise at the high-grade char- 
acter of the ore in the new find. Strikes of superlatively rich 
ores are not an uncommon occurrence, and in this locality, 
in the celebrated Badger property adjoining the Homestake 
ground, ore is constantly extracted the value of which is' 
a long way over the average of what is known as high-grade 
ores in other parts of the world. 

A lot of money is now finding its way 
The Trinity into the northern part of Trinity, 
Gravel Bonanza, through the operations of the Sweep- 
stake Company. A great many men are 
employed at ditch building and grading from the flumes, 
which will be put in at a cost of thousands of dollars. 
Superintendent Anderson is now in the field outlining the 
work on the ground, preparatory to bringing the water in 
which is the chief task. The ground itself had been thor- 
oughly prospected before the sale was consummated. 

The sure-thing speculators of San 
Purging the Oil Francisco, the people who never in- 

Investment Market. vest a dollar without having, as 
they suppose, a good stout string 
tied to it, and who could not be persuaded to put a cent into 
a legitimate proposition, have been done up brown by unscru- 
pulous promoters of oil schemes. The town is full of them. 
The slump in the market for oil shares and the distrust 
which it has engendered among speculators, sounded the 
death knell for the sure-thing swindlers, who are as ole- 
aginous themselves as the commodity in which they profess 
to deal. The exposures of the Santa Maria's line of opera- 
tions and the flight over night of the promoters of the Stand- 
ard Oil Investment Company is only a forecast of what is 
to come in the future. There are many other concerns which 
vill follow the same line of departure before the atmosphere 
is cleared sufficiently to expect a rehabilitation of the busi- 
ness on a safe and clean basis. The good Boston magazine 
proprietors who took a fee to publish the fact that a non- 
producing company like the Santa Maria Oil Company is 
paying a 2 per cent dividend, find themselves now in the 
same level as the man who paid them, to float the story all 
ever the country that Mr. Bernard Marks has been for 
many years Superintendent oi Schools in this city. It ap- 
pears upon .investigation that the said Marks once upon a 
time served as Vice-Principal of a grammar school here, 
but now he has no connection with the department what- 
ever. The President of this Company, it appears, notified the 
proprietors of this magazine that they were in the wrong 
in regard to this advertisement, but the only answer he got 
was that a Boston firm of brokers had indorsed it. "Well- 
known and responsible firms," it said, and they must be. He 



also admitted that tha Banta Marin had do well upon its 

property, and an 

">e ii pared i" pai two pei cent monthly 

lends aii.i tie "well-known and responsible" broking 

llr '» of BVn I menl it is unfortnnai 

tne name of this firm is not available fol Hi.- him in- 
itial us reaponalblllty ami arldanl respectability oould 

tter known than it is. (in top "1 tbl be an 

1 niliiei nient that the tilth Hi, is. William [{wing and G 

B. Chaney, promoters of tha si lard Oil Promotion and in- 

i-eatmenl Company, have cleaned up theli Ill-gotten gains 
and levanted, leaving behind a lot of gudgeons who havi 
well fleeced. Tha souvenir prospectus Issued by this precious 

lair is a gem in its way. and so full of exaggerated 
ments thai it is a wonder an] one could be foolish enough to 
take stock in it It simply appealed to the inordinate cupid- 
Ity of an ignorant class calculated to jump at any will 
I bait, and it hooked hundreds, how many will possibly 
never be known. Large or small as the amount may be it is 
gone lo Cue last penny, and even .he clerical assistants, who 
worked While the principals collared the cash receipts 
in luxurious idleness, have been unpaid. As usual in a plant 
of this kind, the names of leading banks were used for ap- 
pearances, and for the purpose of creating an impression of 
solidity of the East and abroad, wherever the fraudulent 
circulars and prospectuses found their way by mail. The oil 
industry will not suffer eventually from the purging process 
now going on. It had to come sooner or later, that was 
evident from the start, and the realization of the true state 
of affairs now developed has served to keep the better class 
of investors out of the market until the impending storm had 
blown over. In the meantime, however, it is not pleasant 
tor the unwary who have been hooked in the interim. 

The fact that names of reputable 

An Evil Which Should banking concerns in this city are 

Be Checked. being used by the promoters of 

oil and other companies, which 
are nothing more than thieving bunco games, with the 
base intent of supporting and aiding the disposition of worth- 
less stock, should serve to arouse the bankers to the neces- 
sity of stopping the practice at once. It is a piece of rank 
impudence to use the name of a bank without consulting its 
management and obtaining permission, but it must be re- 
membered that impudence is part. and parcel of a sharper's 
stock in trade. The most worthless enterprises manipulated 
by well-known crooks are now floating around this city, and 
their prospectuses are being mailed by thousands monthly 
ever the entire world, and on every one of them can be found 



200,000 H. P. 




Developed by 

Pelton Wheels 

Operatine electric trans- 
mission plants alone : : : 

Sensitive Regulation 

Pend for illustrated catalogue. 

THE 
PELTON WATER WHEEL CO. 

127 Main St. San Francisco- Cal. 
143 Liberty St., New York, N.Y. 



and 
Supplies 



n.ning riachinery 

The Ropp Straight Line Furnace. 

Huntington Centrifugal Roller Mill. 

Bartlett Concentrating Table. 

James Ore Feeder. 

Roger Improved Crushing Rolls. 

Dodge Rock Breakers and Pulverizers. 

Two and Three Stamp Mills. 

Engines, Boilers, Steam and Power Pumps. 

Wood-Working and Iron-Working Machinery. 

PARKE & LACY CO. 21 and 23 Fremont street. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 13, 1901. 



the name of some local bank, which is mainly depended 
upon to add tone to the scheme. A business firm would not 
stand such an action upon the part of any one, and why 
should a reputable and wealthy bank allow itself to figure 
in a false position and share eventually the obliquy of the 
transaction among people who know no better. So-called 
fiscal agents and "bankers" without a sou to their credit 
in the world, owning nothing more than the clothes they stand 
in — harness, as they call it — are getting too numerous in 
this city for the good of the public, and a banking associa- 
tion ought to be found to deal with the growing evil. Invest- 
ors should never fail to investigate all statements of the 
kind appearing in the circulars they receive by mail. It 
is always safe to stamp a man a fraud when he is caught 
posing for something which he is not. 

UNLISTED SECURITIES. 
Oil Stocks. 



Which undersigned offers for sale at the following: prices: 



500 San Antonio 

1000 Bachelors 

2000 General Gleaves 

500 Santa Maria 

1000 California Rock Oil.. 
1000 Union Jack 

500 Lincoln 

300 Diamond 

1000 Panochlto 

1"00 Sunset Crude 

1000 Transcontinental ... 

1000 Imperial Cons 

1 100 Three States ..... 

1000 Transfer 

500 Wellington 



15 1000 California Crude-.. 

05 500 California Fortune 

12% 250 Lake & Colusa O & L 



10 

-.5 



05 
02 
02 

04 
05 
05 



3 00 
10 
1« 
12 
20 
05 
31 



1000 Kern River Oil Con. 

500 Prudential 

1000 Lion 

1000 Grand Pacific 

1000 Meridian 

500 Sovereign 
1000 Superior Extension 
Yl 1000 Superior Develop... 

01 500 Occidental 

01 500 Eclipse O & De.el.. 

05 500 Kern Valley 

05 500 California Mutual .. 20 

On application I will mail to you the Ready Reference pook containing 
the latest information on oil stocks. 

Orders for buying or selling above stocks (listed and unlisted) promptly 
attended to by 

Joseph B. Toplitz. Stock Broker. 
Member Producers' Oil Exchange. Rooms 9 and 10. 330 Pine street. 



51 
10 

is 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 510 Montgomery street, 

San Francisco, deals In all kinds of newspaper Information, 
business, personal, political, from press of State, Coast, and 
country Tel. Main 1042. 



OBITUARY. 

News was received here Monday of the death at Hon- 
olulu on July 2d of Hon. Paul Neumann, well known in San 
Francisco. He died of paralysis of the brain. Mr. Neumann 
was one of the most prominent lawyers in Honolulu, where 
he had lived since 1883. He was Attorney General under 
both King Kalakaua and Queen Liliuokalani, representing 
the latter at Washington in 1893, when the Annexation 
'treaty was before the Senate. 

Mr. Neumann lived in San Francisco for many years and 
was one of the founders of the Bohemian Club. He was a 
leading spirit of that organization while here, and made 
hosts of friends through his kindly, genial nature. He served 
one term in the State Senate. Mr. Neumann was a native 
of Prussia and was 62 years of age at the time of his death. 
He left two sons and four daughters. He was a prominent 
Mason, and his funeral was held under the auspices of that 
order. 

Dr. H. W. Harkness, the venerable scientist, died at his 
rooms at the Pacific-Union Club on Wednesday morning. 
He had oeen confined to his bed for over a month. Dr. Hark- 
ness was born at Pelham, Mass., May 25, 1821, so was over 
eighty years of age at the time of his death. After winning 
his medical degree he came to California, arriving here in 
1849. He practiced medicine for twenty years, amassing a 
fortune. Since 1869 he devoted himself to scientific re- 
search, and gained world-wide fame. He made many trips 
abroad, and was an invited guest of the Viceroy of Egypt 
at the opening of the Suez Canal. Aside from his great men- 
tal qualities. Dr. Harkness was revered for his nobility of 
character, and his death has caused deep sorrow. Mr. F. 
J. Harkness, the only surviving near relative, was with 
Dr. Harkness during his last moments. 



SOUTHFIELD WELLINGTON COAL 
order from any coal dealer. 



St. Louis A. B. C. Beer, Pure, Pale and Sparkling, the king 
of all bottled Beers. 



St. Louis A. B. C. Beer, Pure, Pale and Sparkling, the king 
of all bottled Beers. 



Wdkn (he bar-keeper sets out Jesse Moore 
mer the best in the house. 



AA," he gives the Ousto- 




As you are well aware, the average man wants money. 
You frequently ask yourself no doubt, "How can I make 
more money easily?" Here is the answer: "Make wise 
investments. Place your money where it will earn for you 
from 100 per cent, to 500 per cent. Don't be hasty, 'look 
before you leap. We have for you a chance of a life-time." 

The largest oil channel in the State is in the Coalinga 
District and passes through the properties owned by the 
Mt. Hamilton Land and Oil Company. Many unscrupulous 
companies with bold facade beat the public and thereby 
cause many substantial companies to suffer from their im- 
pure methods, but the Mt. Hamilton Land and Oil Company 
are out of debt, own their lands, and the management are 
pushing the business as rapidly as prudence and good busi- 
ness judgment .will allow. Development work is now going 
on on their lands at Alcalde station. In order that they 
might not be misguided by freaks, seepages or crevice for- 
mations, they have had their properties thoroughly tested 
and experted by up-to-date responsible parties who are 
thoroughly familiar with oil bearing sands. They assure 
the company that theirs is an exceptionally wide oil channel 
of very high grade and that they will undoubtedly strike 
a gusher of great volume. This company covers the widest 
purview. Invite closest scrutiny. Bank references. Stock 
will be but 15 cents a share until July 15th, at which time 
it will advance to 25 cents or more. You are heavy losers 
if you allow this rare chance to pass you. Ask about them. 
DIRECT ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO 

ROOMS 30-31-32-33 REA BUILDING, SAN JOSE. CAL. 



July 1J, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



15 



A BIT THEATRICAL. 

By Robert McTavlsh. 



A School for Scandal. 



There Is a big. husky workingman In tin* town who is 
looking for a little rod-headed fellow with a png nose, nml 
his companion, a lantern-jawed wag. who united in basely de- 
ceiving him. 

It happened at the Alcazar — the performance. "Sapho." 
They who have seen It know that there are two hi enes In the 
first act. and that In the Inst one Jean carries Sapho up 
stairs. Press agents have talked much about this scene, 
but It doesn't come up to their representations. Really. 
It is the mildest thing In the play. 

The big man sat next to the pug-nosed and lantern-jaw. •<! 
combination. Before the performance commenced he picked 
up an acquaintance with them, and his conversation re- 
vealed an unlimited faith in press agents' stories. During 
the first scene he seemed to consider his faith justified. He 
went out when the curtain fell, and the others followed him 
at the end of the second scene. He was in the lobby 
when they came out. smoking and looking puzzled. 

"Say," he questioned. "Wasn't that the end of the act 
v.-hen I left?" 

"No," said the lantern-jawed one. "That was only half 
of it." 

"Did the rest of it amount to anything?" said the big man 
eagerly. 

"What! Did you miss that? It was the whole show." 

"Honest?" 

"Sure. Worst thing I ever saw. We're going home now. 
The rest of it doesn't amount to anything." 

"The police ought to suppress it," said the red-headed 
man. 

"A nice family theatre like this, too," said the other. "It's 
a shame." 

"Gosh! Is it as bad as that?" exclaimed the big fellow, 
rubbing bis hands. 

"Worse," was the reply. Then he launched into a detailed, 
exaggerated and highly colored description of the scene. 

The big fellow took it all in eagerly and asked a few 
questions in a subdued voice. The lantern-jawed man 
nodded. 

"Gosh!" said the deluded one — and he immediately bought 
a ticket for the next performance. That is why the red- 
headed man and the lantern-jawed man are afraid to travel 
separately, and start apprehensively at the sound of heavy 
footsteps behind them. 

It Vos No Usefulness. 

There is a theatre in this town that has on the lower 
tloor a few excellent seats, which are sold at half the price 
of the others, but are unreserved. When anything good is 
on there is a jam at the doors when they open at half-past 
seven, anu a wild scramble for these choice places. 

A young couple were among those closest to the door a 
few nights ago, and by running they got good seats, well up 
in front. The girl took the inside one, and the young man, 
baying that he would be back in a few moments,, put her 
cloak on the seat next to the aisle and left her. He hadn't 
been gone ten seconds when a very large woman, who, from 
her dialect, might possibly have been German, plumped onto 
the cloak. 

The young lady mildly protested, explaining that the seat 
was being held for a friend. 

"Dot been no goot, nicht," said the old lady. "Dese seats 
been not reserved yet. Vat?" 

The other was trying to explain that her companion had 
just stepped out for a moment, when he returned. 

"Excuse me," he said, politely to the German dowager, 
"but you have my seat." 

"Oxcuses me, but I tink not yet yes. I pay mine quar- 
ter, vas it, und I take vat seat I get alretty. You vos left." 

"But I came here with this young lady, madam." 

"Und you may leave ven you get ready mit de young lady, 
so. I leef my seat alretty last week und somebody fool me, 
und now I fool somebody sometimes." And she settled back 
with an air of grim determination. 

She would listen to no arguments, so the young man called 
the usher. He proved very polite and sympathetic, but was ■ 



NewEnjIand 
Conservatory 

OF MUSIC 



Though "New England 11 In 
it is national in rcpntatloih—yes, inter- 
national, for it bos proved the fallacy of 
the nocasity for foreign study to m.ilct 
.1 finished musician or elocutionist, 

uEORdE W. CHADWICK, Mm. Dlrcc. 
All fiar/itut.ir. ,■ :,./,"/ he lent ly 

FRANK W. HALE. Geo. Man.. Boston, M«m. 



A to acknowledge that the old lady had the better of 
it. Then the young fellow tried diplomacy. He suggested 
that she nt least let him take the cloak upon which she was 
sitting. She consented, and as she raised from the seat he 
made a swift move to slip Into her place. But she was too 
quick. Like a flash she was hack in the seat. 

"Ah! tJot vos your game some more, young ^tan, so! 
You vos no shentleman to act like dot mit some ladies vos it 
nicht. Ven you been retty to go home I let you haf der 
cloak sometimes. Vat?" 

Whetner the audience had more fun out of the episode or 
the performance is a question, -ut that the old lady enjoyed 
her .evening thoroughly was beyond dispute. 



THE QUAKERS AT HENLEY REGATTA. 

The defeat of the University of Pennsylvania crew in the 
final heat for the Grand Challenge Cup at the Henley Re- 
r.atta this year was a disappointment and surprise to those 
Americans whose patriotism considerably exceeds their 
knowledge of rowing. 

It is, however, almost universally agreed that the Quaker 
eight was a better crew than any before sent from the United 
States to England. The Pennsylvanians were in perfect 
training, and their short, quick stroke, devoid of body-swing, 
leg, or loin work, though very exhausting to endurance and 
vitality, was not ill-adapted to a short course like the Henley 
one of one mile 550 yards in almost still water. But no one 
need suppose for a moment that, even if by an improbable 
chance the Quakers had won the blue ribbon of amateur 
oarsmanship, their victory would have "revolutionized the 
style of rowing at Eton, Oxford, or Cambridge, as some ir- 
responsible enthusiast vainly suggested. Every theory of 
i owing has been threshed out on the Thames, and exponents 
of every style have done their best upon its waters for 
the past century or thereabouts. It is, besides, a fact gen- 
erally admitted among men of experience in English rowing 
that a fast, bucketing stroke, rowed by men in good enough 
training to stand it, though lacking in many of the elements 
of a good style, will now and then win short races. But to 
pull with the arms, as the Pennsylvanians are said to have 
done, is contrary to the best theory and practive of rowing, 
and, though it may occasionally "come off" over the short 
college courses on the Isis or the Cam, is universally recog- 
nized by the best oarsmen, past and present, as erroneous 
and faulty. If the Quakers were to try to row their bucket- 
ing stroke over the four-and-a-half miles from Putney to 
Mortlake, they might lead for the first mile, for the first 
two miles, perhaps for the first three, but then they would 
come back surely and inevitably to a good eight rowing 
a long, well-pulled-through leg and body stroke of about 36 
to the minute. 

Arthur Inkersley, 
Formerly of the Oxford University Trial Eight. 



Leopold, the florist, of 34 Post street, has an unusually 

fine display of flowers at present. He takes a proper pride 
in keeping the best stock in town. 



St. Louis A. B. C. Beer, Pure, Pale and sparkling, the king 
of all bottled Beers. 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing 

Syrup" for your children while teething. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 13, 1901. 




murance 



" ' ' : ~ " : -^' : '■■' 




Fifty thousand dollars were, by an act of the last Gen- 
eral Assembly of the State of Missouri, transferred from 
the insurance department fund of that State to the State 
revenue fund. If Missouri with only a few examinations per 
annum, can transfer $50,000 to the State, how much should 
the insurance departments of the States of Minnesota and 
Wisconsin transfer on the basis as proposed by Minnesota's 
Commissioner to Secretary Barnum of Accident fame, at 
$125.00 per exam. 

* * * 

Regarding the necessity for stricter examination of the 
trigin and cause of fires, the following statement, made by 
an exchange in writing of the operation of the new office of 
Fire Marshall of Ohio (now a little over five months old), 
says: During these months 2,780 fires were investigated. 
Carelessness was responsible for 1.569, and over 900 were 
charged to unknown or suspected incendiarism. Only about 
three hundred of the entire number were recognized as 
purely accidental." 

* * * 

What has become of the State Life Insurance Company of 
Indiana? 

* * * 

The North German Insurance Company has reinsured all 
its United States' business, outside of that confined to Chi- 
cago and the Pacific Coast. The Hartford got it. The 
Transatlantic has followed suit, with the exception that it 
keeps the New York business in addition to the Pacific Coast 
and Chicago. The Westchester got this. 

* * * 

Mr. Geo. H. Tyson is now doing business at the new stand, 
214 Sansome street. 

* * * 

The News Letter regrets to chronicle the sad death of 
Mr. Harry W. Bromwell. aged 20. He was the son of Mr. L. 
L. Bromwell. and was rapidly making his mark as a keen, apt 
business man. To his father and mother go out the regrets 
of those who know them. Alas, that sympathy is all that ran 
be offered. 

* * * 

The Hartford has reinsured the American. This is the sec- 
ond time the American has gone out by the reinsurance 
route. It should by all chances stay dead this time. 

* * * 

The Mutual Reserve and The Endowment or Insurance 
annex of the Knights of Pythias are both in shallow water. 
They are each going to issue a special assessment, and the 
customary platitudes to their members. The mam point, 
however, is that of the demonstration of the futility of 
assessmentism. 

* * * 

Mr. J. H. Lenehan. western manager of the Phenix of 
Brooklyn, has been elected chairman of the governing com- 
mittee of the Western Union, succeeding Mr. J. W. G. Cofran. 
who tendered his resignation. 

* * * 

The London and Lancashire Fire, in its report submitted 
to its stockholders for the year ending December 31. 1900, 
shows that the net premium income of the company amount- 
ed to S4.77S.530. The net fire losses incurred aggregated 
$2,417,070. Not such a bad showing. 

* * * 

It will be remembered that Colonel W. M. Hahn, of Ohio, 
one time Superintendent of Insurance for that State, brought 
the Manhattan out to California and unfortunately left it be- 
hind him when he went back. In conjunction with his inter- 
ests in the Manhattan, he was one of the trustees of the 
Buckeye Mutual Fire of Ohio. It is now charged that he 
with the assistance of the other trustees, has handled some 
$56,000 of the Buckeye money. And the company now wants 
il back. 



Francis Hendricks, Superintendent of Insurance for the 
State of New York, in his annual report says, regarding capi- 
tal stock: "Under the existing provisions of our insurance 
law, in estimating the liabilities of a life insurance corpora- 
tion, capital stock is expressly excluded. In every other 
insuranoe corporation of the State capital stock is held to be 
a liability. I know of no good reason why the capital stock 
of a life insurance company should not be treated the same 
as capital stock in any other insurance corporation. When 
it is not considered a liability, it may be entirely depleted, 
the policyholders left without the protection which it should 
afford, and yet the company may return it in its annual 
statement and publish it in its advertisements as paid up 
in cash for its full amount. This condition of affairs was 
shown by the examination of a life insurance company which 
was lately completed by the Department." His reasoning is 
sound. What is the name of the company referred to? 

* * * 

The total amount now deposited by insurance companies 
with the New York Department is $21,173,511. being an in- 
crease in the deposits since December, 1899, of $1,189,205. 

* * * 

Mr. George S. Dornin, General Agent of the National & 
Springfield, leaves for an extended Eastern trip next week. 

* * « 

Shamrock II is insured at Lloyds for about $121,250, the 
rate being $21.82 per cent. 

* * * 

An insurance policy for $8,000 in the Mutual Benefit Life 
on the life of Mr. Edwin W. Twichell, insolvent, was sold by 
auction last Saturday at Plainville, Conn., for $145. 

* * * 

The Attorney-General of Montana has rendered an opinion 
to the Governor that insurance is not commerce. Therefore 
the anti-compact legislation in that State does not apply 
to insurance. 



CHANGES IN SOUTHERN PACIFIC MANAGEMENT. 

Mr. Jerome A. Fillmore has retired from the position of 
manager of the Pacific system of the Southern Pacific 
Company, and has been succeeded by Mr. J. M. Herbert, an 
old and experienced railroad man. Mr. Earl H. Fitzhugh has 
been appointed assistant to President Hays. Mr. Fitzhugh 
l.as had twenty-eight years' active railroad experience. 

.Mr. Fillmore has been with the Southern Pacific Company 
lor thirty years and has always been looked upon as one of 
the corporation's most valuable men. His popularity is 
as wide as his acquaintance, and there is much regret over 
his retirement. 



A Mother's Milk 
may not fit the requirements of her own offspring. A fail- 
ing milk is usually a poor milk. Borden's Eagle Brand 
Condensed Milk has been the standard for more than forty 
years. Send 10c. for "Baby's Diary." 71 Hudson St., N. Y. 



Alligator pears, Lima beans, mountain peaches, fresh 

tigs, all kinds of fruits and vegetables, at Omey & Goetting's, 
stalls 33', 34, 45 and 46 California Market. 



The Pacific Coast Polo and Pony Racing Association is 
making great preparations for its tournament of amateur 
sports at Del Monte from August 19th to 24th. inclusive. 
Races, polo and golf will take up the six' days, and coaching 
v. ill continue throughout the week. Polo tournaments will 
be held on the first four days, and some exciting contests 
are looked for. The men's amateur competition at golf 
for the Del Monte cup is causing much speculation as to the 
possible winner. The hurdle race on the last day will bring 
out some good horses. 




July 13, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




tmbeams 



= 



■2 



INSURANCE. 



"Wrist 1'. lie about that supposed Nldlllat?" i n 

qalred tho Czar. "1 lolii him. Your Hajestjr," replied the 
Cblel of Police. "that if he did not leave the country In 
twenty-four hours, we would consider him guilty and ex< i ate 

him." "What! Such leniency is " "Pardon me, Your 

Majesty! I have made it absolutely Impossible for him to 
■ a passport, and he cannot leave without one." 

"Yes," said the West Point cadet, "the cruelty \v> ha 
put up with at the Academy is something unspeakable." 
What is the trouble now?" asked the sympathetic parent. 
They won't let us haze one another any more." 

"I guess mebbe Josh is goin' to be a great financier, an' 
Kit money by his brains." remarked Farmer Corntossel. 
"Does he take such an interest in commercial affairs?'' 
"No. But he's got to get a livin' somehow. An' he jes' 
von't work." 

Little Clarence — Pa, what's a Prohibitionist? Mr. Calli- 
pers — A Prohibitionist, my son, is a person who would rather 
quarrel over temperance than to do anything to help bring 
it about. 

Little Ikey (who has been reading) — Gee! Fader, how I'd 
like ter own a fife-t'ousandt-tollar aog. Graballski — Mein 
Gott! Vot an egstravagant notion! Vot for you vould vant 
such a costly animal? Ikey — For sale! 

Farmer Honk — Your niece, that's just graduated from the 
academy, does fancy work most of the time, don't she?" 
Farmer Flintrock — Yes; an' she don't fancy work none of the 
time. 

"No," said the Fox, as he looked up at the grapes, "they 
may not be sour. But," he continued judiciously, "I see no 
reason why one should invite an attack of appendicitis." 

Mamma — What, Johnny! Your eye is swollen and your 
nose bloody! Have you been fighting again? Little Johnny 
— No'm; — been fit! 

Mrs. Newlywed (reading) — Do you know how lobsters are 
caught, John? Mr. Newlywed — Come, come, Mary! Don't 
rub it in! 

A woman's idea of art is to make a dinner so elaborate 
that the guests will not know how to eat it. 

Some people are as dull and uninteresting as the baseball 
columns of an afternoon newspaper. 




INSURANCE COMPANY 

OJT FBBBPORT 



G. H.WARD, 

Manager, 

337 PINE STREET. 
Sar. Francisco, Ca 
Phone, Main 5509- 



New Amsterdam Casualty Company 

of New York 

405 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Edmund F. Green, Manager. Jesse W. Lilienthal, Attorney. 

Employers' Liability, Accident. Burglary and Salary Insurance. 

Fire Association, of Philadelphia 
Philadelphia Underwriters, of Philadelphia 

PENN 

J. M. BECK, Manager 
219 Sansome street, San Francisco, Cal. 



* insurance: co. 

of Brooklyn 



412 MONTGOMERY ST , S, F. 

M. McD. SPENGER, 

General Agent for 

Pacific Coast, British Columbia 
ft nd Hawaiian Islands. 



FIRE, MARINE. AND INLAND INSURANCE 



FIREMANS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



Capital $1,000,000 Assets, $4,000,000 

PALATINE 

INSURANCE COMPANY (limited) OF LONDON ENGLAND 

C F- MULLINS, Manager. 4l6-(l8 California street, s. F. 
FIRE INSURANCE 

Founded A. D. 1792 

nsurance Oompany of / lorth America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Pald-UD Capital (3,000.000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 15 022,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California street, S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720 
Capital Paid Up, (3,446.100 Assets. 124.662 043.36 

Surplus to Policy Holders. (8.930.431.41. Losses Paid Over. 1184,000,000.00 

PACIFIC COAST BRANCH: 

501 Montgomery street. 
FRANK W. DICKSON, Manager 
HERMANN NATHAN tc PAUL F. KINGSTON. Local Managers. 

FIRE, MARINE. AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

Mew Zealand Insurance Company 

of New Zealand 
Capital. 15,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office in company's building, 312 California street 

W. P. THOMAS, Manager 
Hooker & Lent. City Agents, 14 Post street 

Phoenix Assurance Co., of London 

Established 1782 

Providence-Washington Insurance Company 

Incorporated 1799 
BUTLER & HEWITT. General Agents 413 California street. S. F. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Co. 

OF HAJBTFORD 

Cash Capital (1,000,000.00 

Cash Assets 4.081.895.13 

Surplus to Polloy Holders.... 2,092,661.01 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager 
COLIN M. BOYD, San Francisco agent, 411 California street. 

Br.tish and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) OF LIVERPOOL 

Capital (6.700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents 816 California street, S. F 

The Thuringia Insurance Company 

of ERFURT. GERMANY 
Capital, (2,250,000 Assets. (10,984,248 

YOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Manage 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome street, S. F. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

ol Hamburg, Germany 
N. Schlesslnger, City Agent. 304 Montgomery St., 8. 1\ 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 13, 1901. 




ocieiy 



. ' ■ U...J-.L ' 




This nas been a week of weddings, and there are more to 
follow in the immediate future. The first wedding of the 
week was a quiet home ceremonial, taking place at the 
Loud residence on Octavia street on Tuesday afternoon. 
If it could have had a nomenclature it might have been 
termed a "rose wedding," so many of those beautiful flowers 
were used in adorning the rooms. They were combined with 
light, graceful foliage, giving them a most attractive appear- 
ance. Less than two score of friends and relatives were as- 
sembled for the ceremony, which was performed at three 
c 'clock by the Rev. Dr. Moore of the Methodist church. 
The bride, who wore a pretty gown of grey silk trimmed with 
ecru lace, was unattended, except by her sister, Mrs. Callun- 
dan. The groom. Mr. James O'Connell, was supported by his 
brother John as best man. A handsome dejeuner was served 
after the nuptial blessing had been bestowed, and later in 
the day Mr. and Mrs. O'Connell departed to spend their 
honeymoon in Oregon. Upon their return they will reside 
in San Francisco. 

Next in order came the marriage of Miss Alice Chipman 
and Mr. Chester Smith, which was one of the events of Wed- 
nesday. This was another home wedding, and the residence 
of the bride's father, General N. P. Chipman. on Laguna 
street, was the scene of the ceremony, w r hich took place at 
noon, the Rev. Mr. Macon, of Trinity Church, officiating. 
The pretty bride, who was robed in white satin and point 
lace, wore a tulle veil and carried a bouquet of lilies of the 
valley. Miss Florence Deming, who was daintily gowned in 
pink cniffon. appeared as maid of honor, and Mr. Julian 
Thorne was the groom's best man. A bridal breakfast fol- 
lowed the ceremony, and then came the departure of the 
bride and groom on their honeymoon trip. Their destination 
was known only to themselves. 

Midsummer has seldom seen a prettier wedding than that 
of Miss Florence Davis and Lieutenant L. R. Burgess, U. S. 
A., for whicn the home of the bride's parents, Dr. and Mrs. 
Davis, on Scott and Green streets, was en fete last Thurs- 
day. Tue decorations were particularly pretty and appropri- 
ate, consisting of an artistic combination of flowers with the 
national colors and army emblems. Bishop Nicholls officiat- 
ed at the ceremony, which took place at noon, the bridal 
party consisting of Lieutenants n.. P. Brower. Lloyd England, 
W. B. Pershing and Guy Cariton, who filled the role of ush- 
ers. The Misses Helen Stubbs, Meda Hougmon, Jessie 
Hooper and Florence Dunham, were the attendant brides- 
maids, with Miss Lillian Van Dyke as maid of honor. All the 
attendant young ladies were gowned alike in white chiffon 
and carried large clusters of scarlet geraniums. The bride 
was robed in white satin, trimmed with point lace and orange 
blossoms, and was escorted by her father, who gave her 
away. The groom's best man was Lieutenant A. J. Bowley. 
A reception followed the ceremony, a large number of army 
people figuring among the guests, and delicious refreshments 
were server. 

Miss Evelyn Shepard and Mr. Percival Lewis were the 
bride and groom at the marriage ceremony performed at the 
Shepard residence on Taylor street on Wednesday evening. 

The Davis residence at Scott and Vallejo streets was en 
fete last Thursday when at, the hour of noon miss Florence 
Davis and Lieutenant L. R. Burgess, U. S. A., were united 
in marriage, Bishop Nicholls officiating. 

The return of Lieutenant C. P. Summeral from the Phil 
ippines, which was announced last week, was awaited for 
the formal announcement of his engagement to Miss Morde- 
cai, though it has been an open secret for some time past. 
It is now made public, and the wedding will be an event of 
the near future, and will probably take place at Benicia. 
where the father of the bride-elect, Colonel Mordecai, U. S- 
A., is stationed at present. One of the most recent an- 
nouncements is of the engagement of Miss Ruth Rising of 



Berkeley to Signor Corradob Menicanti, which has lately 
been received from Rome, where the several parties are at 
this time. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leland S. Lathrop celebrated the tenth 
anniversary of their wedding by a progressive euchre party 
or. Tuesday evening of last week. Mrs. Rupert Blue and Mr. 
Fred Kellan carried off the chief prizes. 

The first large dance of the season at the Hotel Rafael 
look place on the evening of Juiy 4th. The large dining room 
was conveited into a ball room for the occasion, and re- 
freshments were served in the smaller one adjoining. Nearly 
all the guests of the Hotel were present as well as a large 
contingent of outsiders — i. e., tue cottagers of that lovely 
vale — and all enjoyed the dancing until far past the midnight 
hour. 

Among the gastronomic affairs of this week was the din- 
ner given by Mr. and Mrs. Claus Spreckels on Tuesday even- 
ing, and the farewell banquet at the Bohemian Club to Dr. 
H. J. tstewart. who will soon depart for Boston. The feast 
was laid in the Red Room, on Monday evening, amid red 
and green floral decorations. Between forty and fifty 
guests took part in the festivity, which was prolonged until 
a late hour. 

Next week we shall have the pleasure of listening to one 
oi those mammoth choral festivals which we have periodi- 
cally enjoyed ever since the inauguration of the idea by Mr. 
Carl Zerhann, away back in May, 1878. On this occasion we 
shall be indebted to the Epworth League, which is about to 
assemble here in convention, and 'tis said there will be a 
chorus of over two thousand voices heard in the Pavilion 
at a concert on Tuesday evening. 

The East is just now furnishing many items of interest 
to San Francisco's social circle, particularly those of the 
older set — or what may be termed the old timers. Who 
among them does not remember Mr. Charlie Fairfax, the 
"well-beloved." For he was loved by every one who knew 
him. His home was in Sacramento, yet he and his wife 
were well-known in San Francisco's social world. Mrs. Fair- 
tax, a sister of Mr. Calhoun Benham, an early day lawyer, 
was a very beautiful woman, and her friends often styled 
her Ada, Lady Fairfax, for Charlie was by right tenth Baron 
Fairfax in the Peerage of Great Britain. The tale now comes 
from New York of the move made by his nephew, a resident 
of that city, to revive his right to the Scotch title of Baron 
Fairfax, Earl of Culpepper. Next in line comes the story 
of Mr. Lloyd Turner, who. while yet a kid. has distinguished 
himself by eloping with and marrying a young Miss from 
Virginia, deserting her ere a week of the honeymoon had 
elapsed, and being sued by her for divorce. The youthful 
bridegroom, who spent his childhood in California, is a son of 
Colonel John T. Grayson, erstwhile of San Francisco, from 
whom his mother was divorced some years ago. He is a 
nephew of Mrs. R. T. Cutts. of Mare Island, and of the widow 
of Surgeon-General Brown of the navy, and a cousin of Mr. 
Turner iviessersmith, their mothers being sisters and among 
the earliest of our pioneer belles. They resided at Mare Is- 
land, where their father was Civil Engineer at the Navy 
vard. A third item of interest is anent Miss Ringgold, who 
according to news from i\ew York is "a young Californian 
who aspires to shine on the vaudeville stage." Miss Ring- 
gold is a Californian by the accident of birth merely, as she 
It ft this State at a very early age. There are many still 
here who can recall Major Ringgold, an army officer resident 
in San Francisco during the sixty decade. His eldest daugh- 
ter married General Naglee of San Jose; another, Sophie, 
became Mrs. Maconichie, and came into prominence during 
the stock excitement period, when she made a pile under the 
fostering care of Senator William Sharon. This Miss Ring- 
gold is her daughter, and has evidently taken her mother's 
maiden name. She is said to possess a good, well-cultivated 
voice, and no doubt we shall hear her some day at the Or- 
pheum. 

There is much regret felt in army circles at the Presidio 
at the approaching departure of Miss Nan Marshall, daugh- 
ter of Colonel J. M. Marshall U. S. A., who for the past two 
years has been quartered at that post, where his family have 
become favorites. Miss Marshall expects to sail for Manila 
the first of August, where her marriage to Captain J. H. 



July 13, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



19 



at the Sixth I'avnlrjr Is to take place. Prior to hn 
leaving, her friends nre Riving h-'r many entertnlnmenls 
i."»dl- int one was the card party given b] 

Mrs Lockwood and Mrs Keithers last Tuesday afternoon, at 
which several pretty prizes were won. 

Mr Joe Redding has gone hack East, but he thinks so little 
of the trip over the road that he may drop in upon us at any 
..me for a twenty four hours call. Mrs W .1. Irwin, who nr- 
rrom the Baal last week and sailed for Honolulu by the 
steamer Sierra, was accompanied by her mother. Mrs Ivors. 
who will remain with Mrs. Irwin in Honolulu during the 
summer months 

Colonel and Mrs. Oreenleaf. pieasantly remembered in the 
1 circles of San Francisco and Berkeley, are now en 
route from the Philippines and due to arrive ere the close 
of the month. Colonel Greenleaf comes to assume the posi- 
tion of chief medical officer of this department on General 
Young's staff. General Young and his daughters are occu- 
pying the comfortable quarters of the Commanding General 
at Fort Mason. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Alexander are due on the Pacific Coast 
early ne\t week; Miss Jennie Flood, who has been visiting 
the Babcocks at San Rafael, expects to spend the rest of 
July at ner brother James' pretty place. Alma, in the Santa 
Cruz Mountains; the Jerome Fillmores. including Miss Jes- 
sie, are enjoying the fishing and other rural pursuits on the 
McCloud River: Miss Charlotte Ellinwood has joined the 
ranks of youth and beauty in the Yosemite Valley; Mrs. 
Norman McLaren is visiting Mrs. Perry Eyre at her Menlo 
Park cottage; Dr. and Mrs. J. D. V. Middleton have selected 
Lake Tahoe as the locale for their holiday trip this season; 
Mrs. M. S. Latham, Dr. and Mrs. Grant Selfridge, and Mr. 
Milton Latham are among the most recent additions to the 
large party of pleasant people who are guests at the Hotel 
Rowardennan; Mr. W. F. Whittier is entertaining a house 
party at his cottage in the McCloud region this week; Judge 
J. M. beawell, accompanied by Mrs. Seawell. is spending his 
vacation at Lake Tahoe; Judge and Mrs. Carroll Cook spent 
the Fourth of July at California Hot Springs; the national 
holiday was spent by Mrs. Nat Brittan and her daughters 
at Highland Springs, and by Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Magee, 
Mrs. Fred Castle, Miss Eva Castle, Madame Dubedat and 
family at Santa Cruz. 

The season is now in full swing at the Hotel Rafael, and 
a large number of San Francisco society people are there 
for the summer. The following are now registered at the 
hotel: Mr. A. S. Ridley and wife, Mr. G. E. Crothers, Mr. 
Milton S. Latham, Dr. Sanford Blum, Mr. Irving Ackerman, 
Mr. C. S. Ackerman and wife, Mr. F. S. Mitchell and wife. 
Miss Elsa Frank, General J. B. Babcock and wife, Mr. Earl 
Fitzhugh, Mr. L. E. Delano, Miss Delano, Miss Gay, Mr. Paul 
Cowles, Dr. J. W. D. Lawton, Dr. and Mrs. H. D. Noble, Dr. 
ana Mrs. C. B. Root, Mr. R. E. Mulcahey and wife, Miss Helen 
Mulcahey, Mr. F. A. Coakley, Mrs. A. H. Busch, Miss Jack- 
son, Mr. C. M. Sadler and wife, Miss Sadler, Miss Ruth 
Sadler,' Mrs. V. Kerwin, Miss Girard, Mr. C. B. Russell, 
Miss Muriel Russell, Miss Rycroft, Mr. O. E. Elston 
and wife, Mr. L. H. Bartlett, Mrs. W. A. Bissell and son, 
MisS:Edwards, Miss E. J. McKinley, Mr. A. M. Oppenbeimer. 

Miss Mabel Mallory, at one time prominent in kindergarten 
work in this city, and now principal of the Baily Gatzert 
system of kindergarten schools in Seattle, arrived in the city 
this week, accompanied by her sister, Mrs. J. A. Hall, for a 
vacation. 

The guests registered at Congress Springs this week are: 
Mrs. R. B. Hollingsworth, Miss Edith Hollingsworth, Miss 
Hazel Hollingsworth, Miss Kathryn Murchison, Mr. W. J. 
Johnson, Mrs. Isaac, Mr. F. S. Oliver, Mr. Lewis Mackenzie, 
Miss lsabelle Mackenzie, Mr. B. Tannabaum, Mr. A. A. 
Brown, Mr. Fred E. Harris, Mr. John C. H. Ferguson and 
wife, Mr. S. C. Wallis, Mr. W. Goldstein, Mr. Walter M. Field, 
Mr. Simon Newman, Mr. H. A. Mosher, Mr. Frank P. Kelly, 
Mr. B. nallgarten and wife, Mr. J. Louis McKinnon, wife and 
child, Mr. J. Newman, Mrs. Fred Roth, Mr. Charles W. Pike, 
Mr. D. P. Foley, Mr. J. B. Medan, Miss May Lowell, Mr. and 
Mrs. M. J. Lyon, Mrs. Grace Duckman, Mr. A. Barland, Mr. 
L. A. Kelly, Mrs. L. A. Kelly, Mr. Fred Roth, Mr. Arthur 



Mm.- I. A Borblai Wer. Miss Marie 

iroler, Mr find Mrs .1 Krlcdland. r. Mr I. \ S. bwa 

Mi \ B Sanborn, Mi iborn, Mr. P \ 

Davidson and wife, Miss Pearl Davidson, Miss Maud J 

l.ulsu Peralta, Mr. Mourn.' M 

Greet* Mis <■ M. Walter, Mr and Mrs Charles J, Si- 

Miss Simons. Mr. John Ciollie«s. Mil Singleton, 

Miss Jessie WilOT, Mrs. F, Owens, Miss Owens, Mr c Wales, 
Mr. David North, Mr. li Owens, Mr. Harrison smith and wife, 
Mr. W. Crocker and wife, Mr. Wesley Pleper and wife, Mr. 

John Klrby. Mr. and Mrs. F. S.intnlli.r. Mr. Stewart ''lilshon, 
Mr Montell Taylor, Mrs. John Dunn, Mrs. Dorothy Mason 
Packer. Mr. Mark J. Samuels. Mr. Jesse Goldstein, Miss 
Snyder, Mr. J. L. Chaddoc k and wife, Mr. Alvena Decoto. 

There are many Eastern tourists at Del Monte this sum- 
mer, as well as an unusually large number of San Francisco 
society people. 

The newly-organized Fremont Club received its friends in 
its rooms In the History Building last evening. 



You will save time, money and trouble by having your 
carpets sent to Spaulding's Carpet Cleaning Works. 353 
Tehama street. There the dirt is thoroughly removed with- 
out injury to the goods, and the carpets sent back looking 
like new. They call for and deliver the goods, and make 
a specialty of doing the work promptly and thoroughly. 



If you want a delicious lunch, properly served, go to the 
Grand Hotel CafG between 11 and 2. Fay & Foster, the pro- 
prietors, keep the best to be had, and have a large patron- 
age among business and club men. 



PBY8tci*N9 would not recommend Jcsbc Moore Whiskey if they did not 
know it to be the beBt in the market. 



IRVING INSTITUTE 



Boarding: and day school for girlp. 2126 California Btreet, San 
Francisco. Accredited to the Universities. The next session 
will begin August 5. For illustrated catalogue address the 
principal, 

REV. EDWARD B. CHURCH, A. M. 



TELEPHONE GRANT 48 



MRS. M. E. PERLEY 

KERAMIC STUDIO 

Instructions In CHINA PAINTING 



Colors and enamels for sale. 
China fired daily. 



Keramlc Roman Gold, $1.00 per box. 
Agent for Revelation Kiln. 



209 A POST ST., 8, F. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society. 

The Board of Directors declared a dividend for the term ending June 30. 
1901, at the rate of three and one-eighth (3^s) per cent per annum on all 
deposits free of taxes, and payable on and after July 1, 1901. Dividends 
nut called for are added to, and bear the same rate of dividend as the prin- 
cipal from and after July 1, 1901. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 

Office— 101 Montgomery St., cor. Sutter St., San Francisoo, Cal, 

DIVIDEND NOTICE, 

California Safe Deposit and Trust Company. 

For the six months endim? June 30, 1901, dividends have been de- 
clared on deposits in the Savings Department of this Company aB follows; 
On Term Deposits, at the rate of three six-tenths (3 6-10) per cent per 
annum, and on Ordinary Deposits at the rate of three (3) per cent per annum, 
free of taxes, and pnyable on and after Monday, July. 1, 1901. Divi- 
dends uncalled for are added to the principal and bear the same rate of 
dividend as the piiucipal from and after July 1, 1901. 

J. DALZELL BROWN, Secretary. 

Cor. California and Montgomery Sts., San Franoisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 
For the half-year ending June 30th, 1901, a dividend has been deolared 
at the rate of three (3) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Monday. July 1, 1901. 

GEORGE A. STORY, Cashier. 
33 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. 

D VIOEND NOTICE. 

The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this society, held June 
28. 19 tl, a dividend hai been declare 1 at the rate ot three and one-eighth 
(3 1 h) per cent, per annum un all deposits for the six months ending June 30, 
1901, free from all taxes, and payable on and after July 1, 1901- 

ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

Office— Corner Market, McAllister and Jones streets, San Franoisco, Cal. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 13, 1901. 



BANKING. 



London and San Francisco Bank, Limited 

434 CALIFORNIA STREET. 
HEAD OFFICE— 71 Lombard street, London. 

Capital Authorized. 12,500.000. Capital Paid Up. $1,400,000. 

Directors— Henry Goachen, Chairman, London; Charlea Edward Brether- 
ton, London; Christian de Guigne. San Francisco; Charles Hemery. 
London; John L. Howard. San Francisco; Bendlx Koppel, London; Nor- 
man D. Rideout, San Francisco; Arthur Scrivener. London. 
Inspector of Branches, Gustav Friederich. 
Agents in New York, Messrs. J. P. Morgan & Co. 
BRANCHES: Portland, Oregon; Tacotua. Wash., Seattle. Wash- 
Letters of credit issued available for travelers and the purchase of mer- 
chandise in any city of the world. Deal in foreign and domestio excha nge 
Accounts of country banks received. Terms on application. 

W. Mackintosh. Manager 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With which is amalgamated The Bank of British Columbia 

HEAD OFFICE— Toronto. 

Paid Up Capital. 88.000.000. Reserve Fund. 82.000,000. 

Aggregate Resources over $65,000,000. 

Hon. Geo- A- Cox. President; B- E. Walker, General Manager. 

J. H. Plummer, Asst. General Manager- 

LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St..E. C, S. Cameron Alexander. Manage 

NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. Alex- Laird and Wm. Gray. 

Agents. 
ONTARIO: 44 BRANCHES- 

Quebec: Montreal; Manitoba: Winnipeg; Yukon District 
Dawson. White Horse; British Columbia: Atlin, Cranbrook. Fernie 
Greenwood, Kam loops, Nanalmo, Nelson, New Westminster, Rossland 
Sandon, Vancouver, Victoria. In the United States— New York. N. Y. San 
F/ancisco. Cal. Seattle. Wash- Portland, Ore- Skagway. Alaska- 
Bankers In London— The Bank of Scotland; Messrs. Smith, Payne & Smiths 
Bankers in New York— The American Exchange National Bank. 
Agents in Chicago — The Northern Trust Company. Agents In New Orleans- 
— The Commercial National Bank. 
San Francisco Office: Walter Powell. Manager. A. Kalnn. Asst. Manager 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,000 Pald-Up Capital. $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $1,000,000 

HEAD OFFICE— 40 Threadneedle street, London, E. C. 

AGENTS: New York — Agency of the London. Paris and American Bank. 

Limited, No. 10 Wall street. N. Y.; Paris— MesBrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 17 

Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 

Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREBNEBAUM. C. ALTSCHUL, Managers. 
R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Sansome and Pine Sts., San Francisco 
Ja«. K. Wilson, President Wm. Pieecb Johnson, Vice-President 

Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashier F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL. $500,000 
SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS. $130,000. 
DLRECTORS—James K. Wilson, Wui. J. Dutton, Wm. Pierce Johnson, Geo 
A, Pope. H. E. Huntington, Henry Pierce. C. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS ; New York— Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank: 
Chemical National Bank, Boston—National Bank of the Commonwealth 
Philadelphia— Drexel &. Co.; Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis 
—The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London-' 
Brown. Shipley A Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes A Co. 

Germania Trust Company of San Francisco 

42 Montgomery St.. San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital, $1,000,000 Paid-Up Capital and Reserve. $390,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian, or Trustee. 

Check Accounts of Individuals, firms, and corporations solicited. 

Legal Depository lor money in Probate Court proceedings. Interest 
paid on trust deposits and savinqs. Investmknts carefully selected 
for our clients. 

" Officers— F. Kronenberg, President; W- A- Frederick, vice-President: H. 
Brunner, Cashier 

Board of Directors— F. Kronenberg. W. A- Frederiok, Fred A- Kuhls, E 
A, Denlcke, A- G. Wleland, Fred Woerner. J. O. Rued, Fred C. Slebe 
John Rapp. 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cob. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 Paid Up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3.000,000 Reserve Fund... 700,000 

Agents at New York- J. & W. Sellgman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the world 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buyB and sells exchange and bullion 
IGN. 8TEINHART, P. N. LnJLENTHAL. Managers. 

Security Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 
Interest paid on deposits. Loanb made. 
DIRECTORS. 



The Bank of California, San Francisco 

Capital, $2,000,000- 
Undivided Profits. July 1, 1901, $2,681,497.64. 

WILLIAM ALVORD .President I THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

CHARLES R. BISHOP Vlce-Hres'l I. F. MOULTON Ass't Cashier 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary I SAM H.DANIELS Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS 

New York— Messrs. Laldlaw <*t Co.: the Bank of New York. N. B. A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston — National Shawmut 
Bank. Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank: First National Bank. 
Philadelphia—Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louis— Boatmen's Bank. 
Virginia City, Nev.— Agency of The Bank of California. London— Messrs 
N. M. Rothschild & Sons. Paris— Messrs. de Rothschild Freres. Berlin- 
Direction der Dtsconto Gene llsch aft. China, Japan, and East Indies— Char- 
tered Bank of India, Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand— The 
Union Bank of Australia. Ltd., and Bank of New Zealand. 

Letters of credit Issued, available In all parts of the world. 

Wells Fargo Zt Co. Bank 

N. E. Cor. Sansome and Sutteb Sts. 
JOHN J. VALENTINE. President H. WADSWORTH, Cashier 

HOMER S. KING. Manager F. L. LIPMAN. Assistant Cashier 

H. L. MILLER, Second Assistant Cashier. 

Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits Deo. 31. 1900 S8.620.223.88 

Branches— New York City. H. B. Parsons. Cashier: Salt Lake City. J. E. 
Dooly. Cashier: Portland, Or., R. Lea Barnes, Cashier. 
DmECTORS— John J. Valentine. Andrew Christeeon, Oliver Eldrldge. 
Henry E. Huntington. Homer S. King. George E. Gray, John J. McCook 
John Bermingham. Dudley Evans. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus $2,290,159.05 

Capital actually paid up In Cash 1.000.000 00 

Deposits June 29. 1901 - 59,886.288.1 1 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President, B. A. Becker; First Vice-President 
Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstman; Cashier, A. H. R 
Schmidt: Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann: Secretary. George Tourny 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller: General Attorney, W. 8. Goodfellow. 

Ign. SMnhart. E. Rohte H. B. Rubs, N Ohlandt. John Lloyd, and I. N 
Walter. 

.Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St.. below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,000,000. Paid Up Capital $300,000 

James D. Phelan, President 8. G. Murphy, Vice-President 

George A. Stobt, Cashier John A. Hooper, Vice-President 

C. B. Hobson. Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, James 
Moffltt. Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Chas. S. Neal, James M. 
McDonald. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange on 
city banks. When opening accounts Bend signature. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

532 CALIFORNIA STREET. S. F. 

Deposits Jan 1. 1901... 827,881,798 Reserve Fund 1223.451 

Paid-up Capital 1,000.000 Contingent Fund 461,847 



E. B. POND, President 
LOVELL WHITE, Cashier 



W. O. B. DeFREMERY. Vice-President 
R. M. WELCH, Assistant Cashier 



William Alvord 
William Babcock 
Adam Grant 



8. L. Abbot. Jr. 
O. D. Baldwin 
W. S. Jones 



H.H.Hewlett 

E. J. MoCutchen 
R. H, Pease 



Directors— Henry F. Allen, Thomas Magee, W. C. B. de Fremery, C. O 
O. Miller, Robert Watt, George C. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin. Jaoob 
Barth, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms and farming 
lanllsln the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made In checks payable 
In San Francisco, Post Office, or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 8 p. m., and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only, 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

Continental Building X Loan Association 

Established In 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 
Subscribed Capital.. 812,000. 000 Profit and Reserve Fund. ..$250,000 
Paid-ln-Capltal 2.000.000 Monthly Income, over 100.000 

Its Purpose is to help Its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on improved property, the members giving first Hens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help Its Stockholders to earn 8 to 12 per cent, per annum on their stock 
and allow them to open deposit accounts bearing Interest at the rate of 5 
per cent, per annum. 

Home Office — 222 Sansome St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Wm. Cobbin, General Manager 

Crocker-Woolworth National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Coeneh Market. Montgomery and Pobt Sts. 

Pald-up-Capltal 11.000 000 

Wm. H. Crocker. President Geo. W. Kline, Cashier 

C. E. Green. Vice-President W. Gregg. Jr., Assistant C» s h|er 

Directors— W. H. Crocker. E. B Pond. George Crocker, O. E. Green, G-W. 
Kline. Henry J. Crocker. G. W. Sootf . 



July IS, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



21 



ItfE Ro; 




THE ROSE OF LIFE. 
Br Ch»rlc« O. r>. Bobarta. in The Otnlurj Macdn*). 
The Rose spoke In the garflon : 

"Why am I sad? 
The vast of sky above mr 

Is blue and glad ; 
The bushed deep of my heart 
Hath the sun's gold; 
The dew slumbers till noon 
In my petals' hold. 
Beauty I have, and wisdom, 

And love I know, 
Yet cannot release my spirit 

Of its strange woe." 

Then a Wind, older than Time, 

Wiser than Sleep, 
Answered: "The whole world's sorrow 

Is yours to keep. 
Its dark descends upon you 

At day's high noon; 
Its pallor is whitening about you 

From every moon ; 
The cries of a thousand lovers. 

A thousand slain, 
The tears of all the forgotten 

Who kissed you in vain, 
And the journeying years that have vanished 

Have left on you 
The witness, each, of its pain, 

Ancient, yet new. 
So many lives you have lived; 

So many a star 
Hath veered in the Signs to make you 

The wonder you are! 
And this is the price of your beauty: 

Your wild soul is thronged 
With the phantoms of joy unfulfilled 

That beauty hath wronged. 
With the pangs of all secret betrayals, 

The ghosts of desire, 
The bite of old flame, and the chill 

Of the ashes of fire." 



WAITING. 

To picture you when far apart from me; 
To guess how you might occupy the day; 
Whether the moments slowly glide away 
And if the hours or swift or tedious be; 
And never from this patient vigil free, 
But like a statue in the sculptor's clay 
Musing and brooding; or, as Moslem's pray, 
Stretching my hands, through silence, out to thee. 
Tnere is so little time, Love, after all, 
To walk together; such a little while 

Before our lives will melt, as in a breath; 
How soon, alas! the leaves of April fall! 

How much I miss the joyance of your smile, 
And waiting seems the bitterness of death. 



AN OLD STORY. 

(Frederic Lawrence Knowles, in Century)- 
They played the game of friendship, moths 

Who scorned the candle's danger, — 
Platonic love their only creed, 
This girl — and stranger. 

The summer ends; with smiles they part; 

Who, think you, would infer 
It had been comedy to him 

And tragedy to her? 



THEY SAID THAT LOVE WAS BLIND. 

(By Virelnla Frazer Boyle, in Harper's Monthly). 
They said that Love was blind — alackaday! — 

Then strung the lute with heartstrings, soft with 
tears; 
And Love was blind, but thoughtless man and maid 
Forgot that Love had ears. 

They said that Love was blind, and let him play 
With apple blossoms, sifted through the years; 

And now each kindred petal in the spring 
Breathes what Love hears. 



USE ALLEN'S FOOTEASE. 



A |K»w.|cr lo fop *h«kcn Into ihr *ho«>« 
*nd hot. mimI «.t tlnd p»»ll> . II | 
Mien"* F.H.i-ITfcjK^ j x , ool* t), r I- 
Ion, >wrMlhiff I** I. Inerowlntr nml 

■ f nil pain ini'l «( | 



1 lr«*l swollen. I ■ 
f. rt ..r Hti'il rtlim. try 
;lng c**> 

ftj|<>llft » i 



Hold >■>■ «11 .In.tti"!- »(..l -h...— t..r. - f.. r r><-. TrUl pucker* FKKK. Ad 
<!roM. Alipn & olirmiol. La R»y. N. T- 



FELIX'S R0TI3SER1E, 




Felix Gouallnardou, proprietor, (formerly wilh 

Jack's Kotisserie), 637 California street, below 

Kearny. Private rooms for families and banquets 

Telephone Black 2906 



Gray Bros. 



238 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 
205 New High Street. Los Angeles. 



Concrete and artificial 
stone work. 

Murphy, Grant & Co., 

Agents for the 

BALTIMORE 

MT. VERNON-WOODBERRY COTTON DUCK CO. 

Importers of Staple and Fancy Dry Goods. Manufacturers of furnishing 
goods. Patentees and sole manufacturers of The " Never-RIp " Overall. 
The beat in the world. 

Full Line of Spring Goods 

J. R. SMITH 
Tailoring Co., 

310 Bush St., under Russ House, S. F. 



(Formerly In Mills BulldlnK 



Joseph Gillott's Steel Pens, THB AWAR ^J A00 .m S 

"Grand Prix" Paris, 1900. The Highest Possible 
Award- These pens are *' the best in the world." 
Sole agent for the United Suite*. 
Mb. Henqt Hob. 91 John street. New York. 
Sold hy all stationers. 

A. B. TREADWELL Attorney-at-Law 

(Formerly Judge Police Court No. 4, 
HAS RESUMED PRACTICE at 533 Kearny St., cor. Sacramento St. 

A I legal business attended to promptly. 

Samuel M. Shortridge, Atty-at-Law 

Crocker Building, San Francisco. 



THE CHAMPAGNES OF 

Moet 6t 
Cfrccndon 

White Seal and Brut Imperial 

now being marketed are of the celebrated vintage of 1893. 

Messieurs. Moet & Ghandonare the most extensive vineyard pro- 
prietors in the world and their Champagnes are having a larger sale 
and are of a quality far superior to any other brand, oeing used al- 
most exclusively at all ultra-fashionable functions, among others at 
the Admiral Dewey Collation, Vanderbilt, Astor, Bradley-Martin, 
Belmont, and Stuyvesant Fish affairs.— New York Wine Circular. 

WILLIAM WOLFF & CO., 

Pacific Coast Agents. Market Street, S. F. 



ANDERSON SPRINGS. 

Only natural Mineral Steam Baths in 

LAKE COUNTY. 
Hot Sulphur and Iron Baths. 
Board: $10 to $14 per week. 
Baths free. Address, 

J. ANDERSON, Anderson Springs, Middletown, 
Lake County, California. 

Fare, San Francisco to Springs and return reduced 
to $8. Send for circular. 
Full particulars at S. F. News Letter, 5y z Kearny St., S. F. 

HOBERG'S RESORT. 

Pleasantly located in a pine forest three thousand 
five hundred feet altitude; highest elevation, low- 
est price. First-class family table and pleasant 

rooms, eight dollars per week. 
Surrounding scenery unsurpassed by any springs 
in the immediate vicinity. Stage daily. Buy tickets 
direct for Hoberg's, Lake County, California. 

George Kammerer and Mrs. M. Hoberg, Proprietors. 

Full particulars at S. F. News Letter office. 

HOTEL BENVENUE AND COTTAGES. 

LAKEPORT, CAL. 
LAKEPORT'S SUMMER RESORT. Situated overlooking 
the shore on Clear Lake. New pavilion, boathouse, and bowl- 
ing alley. Open all the year. Special facilities for accommo- 
dating families with children; home cooking; boating, bath- 
ing, hunting, and superior fishing. Lovely drives and walks. 
Rates: $7 per week. 

FRANK & A. M. SCALES, Proprietors. 

LAUREL DELL LAKE 

lake county, 
the Original Switzerland of America. 

Fishing, Hunting, Boating, (new boats) Tennis, Bowling 
Alley, Dancing and Music, best and largest dance hall in 
Lake County, beautiful drives and walks, new and first class 
livery Largest dining room in Lake County, built over lake. 
Cottages. 

Under new management. Address, 

EDGAR DURNAN, 
Laurel Dell, Lake County, Cal. 

CYPRESS VILLA. 

B STREET, San Rafael, near Narrow Gauge. 

NOW OPEN. This favorite resort has been newly 
furnished and has undergone an entire renovation. 
For families, tourists, and the public generally, the 
accommodations are unexcelled. Board by day, 
week or month. New management. 

MRS. WARBURTON, Proprietor. 

DUNCAN SPRINGS. 

HOPLAND, CAL. 
Lovely drive of two miles from station to hotel. 
Terms: $10 to $12. Best medicinal waters in the 
State. Housekeeping cottages to rent. 

O. HOWELL, Hopland, Cal. 

FARAISO HOT SPRINGS. 

The Carlsbad of America 

Open Winter and Summer 



Monterey County, Cal. 

F. W. Schroeder, Manager. 



C. T. Romie, Proprietor 



Blue 



THE SWITZERLAND OF AMERICA. 
Boating (new boats), bathing, fishing and 
hunting. Dancing and music every even- 
ing except Sundays. Best dance hall in 
Lake County. Fine table; only white 
cooks employed. Send for new pamphlet 
O. WEISMAN, Midlake P. O., Lake County, Cal. 



Lakes 



SKAGGS' HOT SPRINGS. 



Sonoma County, only 4% hours from San Francisco; but 9 miles 
staging; waters noted for medicinal virtues; best natural bath In 
8tate; good trout streams; telephone, telegraph dally mail and ex- 
press; t'rst-class hotel and stage service: morning and afternoon 
stages. Round trip from San Francisco, only $5.50. Take Tiburon 
ferry at 7.30 a. m. or 3.3 p. m. TermB, 82 per day or 812 per week. 
References: Any guest of the past .-ix years. For further Informa- 
tion address 

J. F. MULGREW, Proprietor. 

SKAGGS. GAL. 



HOWARD SPRINGS. 



picturesquely Bituoted amidst the pine forests of Lake County — the 
Switzerland of America. Elevation 2300 feet; no foe; c imnte perfect. 
Natural hot mineral plunge and tub baths, fine medicinal drinking 
water. Excellent fishing and hunting. Telephone on premises. 
Rates, 810 and 812, with special terms for families. Ac- 
comodations, table and service first-class. Round trip from San 
Francisco, via Napa, Caiistoga, 810. including fine stage drive. 
For accommodations and further particulars address 

MRS. R. J. BEEBY, Proprietor. 

HOTEL MOUNT VIEW. 

CHANGED HANDS. Will hereafter be open the year 
round. Bus meet" 9.30 and 11 o'clock trains from city at 
present. Th* culinary departnipnt will receive special 
aiten'ion. For rates and particulars address, 

Hotel Mount View, Ross Valley, Marin County, Cal. 

PACIFIC CONGRESS SPRINGS. 

An ideal spot in the Santa Cruz Mountains. Two hours 
froin San Kranci-co. Five mile» from Los Gatos. No 
tir some staging. Dellgh'ful climate, mineral water 
and table unsurpassed. Boating, swimming and fishing 
and all out-door sports. One of the best tennis courts 
on the Coast. Entire new management. 

A. S. OLNEY, Manager. 

THE GARDEN CITY SANITARIUM. 

Thoroughly Equippko with all modern appliances. X-ray. All 
forms water treatment, the fin at Static Galvanic Sinusoidal and Faradlc 
Electrical apparatus. A Corps of well-trained nurses of both Boxes 
skilled in all forms of treatments and manipulations Rest Cure sclentiflc- 
cally carried out. * * * * A quiet.Chome-llke place, beautiful scenery 
Mount Hamilton and the famous Lick Observatory In plain view; one 
block from electric earn, fifteen minutes wnlk from the center of the city 
Terms 8 10 to 820 per week, including medical attention and regular treat 
ment. 

Garden City Sanitarium, East San Jose, Cal. 



GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL 

Felton, Santa Cruz County, Cal. 
A. J. GASS, Proprietor. 



Six miles from Santa Cruz, 
and % mile from big tr as. 
Bus meets all trains. Terms 
reasonable. 



HOTEL KNICKERBOCKER 



BLITHEDALE 

Mill Valley, Cal. 



VAN NESS AVENUE, 

San Francisco. 



J. A. ROBINSON. 



CALISTOGA & CLEAR LAKE STAGE LINE 

Direct to Harbin. Anderson, Adams, Howard. Astorg. 
Glenbrook, Hoburg* and Selglers Springs Teams and sad- 
dle horses, etc. Write 

WM. SPIERS, Caiistoga. 



July 13, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 






FAINTING SPELLS. 
\ > ..-.-■. nog mnn with ■ yacht 
Swore all nf tho records to blncht : 
Hp was sailing quite fast 
When the wind broke his mast. 
And he gave up his Job on the spai lit 

A maiden with plenty of dough. 
Was a faithful admirer of Pough; 

The "Black Cat" she road 

And nearly fell dead. 
That her author should frighten her sough. 
Francisco, July i». 1901. royce smith. 



"IN ALL CALIFORNIA NO PLACE LIKE THIS.' 



£ CAMP REVERIE ) 

RUN UP FOR A DAY 

SATURDAY AND 
RUN UP RETURN SUNDAY 
OR MONDAY 



PUN UP 



ROUND TRIP, 
Tiburon Ferry. 

H. C. Whiting, 

Gen. Manager 



AND BACK 
ON SUNDAY 

and see for yourself. 

$2.50. Take Boat at 

R. X. Ryan, 

Gen. Pass- & Freight Aeenl 



f CAMP REVERIE I 

ON THE CALIFORNIA NORTHWESTERN R'Y. 



HARBIN SPRINGS 

The Most Accessible and Most Desirable !■ Lake County. 
Contain Sulphur, Iron, Magnesia, and Arsenic. 
Open the Year Round. Hotel. Cottages and Grounds Lighted 
with Acetylene Gas. 'Wonderful cures of rheumatism, gout, 
dyspepsia, catarrh, paralysin. neuralgia, dropsy, blood poison- 
ing, Bkin diseases, kidney, liver and stomach troubles. A Nat- 
ural Mineral or Medicated Mud Rath has just been discovered; 
nothin&r like it known. Don't Miss Harbin Springs During May 
and June. The most delightful months in the year. Absolutely 
free from mosquitoes. Perfect climate; no excensive heat; fin- 
eat vegetable garden in the State. Perfectly equipped livery 
stable In connection with hotel. Home dairy. Popular amuse- 
ments. Two hard-finished cottages juBt completed ONLY SIX 
HOURS from San Francisco. Stage daily from Calistoga to 
Springs. Round-trip tickets at S. P, office, SS- Pine hunting and 
fishing. Rates reasonable- Long distance telephone. 
J. A. HAYS, Proprietor. 

CALIFORNIA HOT SPRINGS 

Hot springs, but not a sanitarium. Formerly AguaCaliente Springs, Sonoma 
Valley. No staging; 46 miles via C. N. Railway or S. P. R. R. Immense 
swimming tank. Splendid table. Come Sundays— try it. Round trip, 
11.10. Telephone. Expensive improvements. $12 and $14. 

COOPER & SHEDDEN, Agua Caliente, Cal. 



GIBBS RESORT 



In. the Santa Cruz Mountains 



Hotel, cabins, camp ground, Redwood groves. Fishing, shoot- 
ing. Cream, milk, poultry, and fresh fruit in abundance. One 
of the most healthful and picturesque resorts in themountaini. 
A. W. J. GIBBS, Proprietor, 
GIBBS, 
Santa Cruz Co., Cal. 

PARK HOUSE Ben Lomond, Cal. 

Pleasant surroundings, beautiful scenery, good table, fish- 
ing, and fine drives. MRS. I. N. HAYES. 



^t ^^ER^£S0RT^i^3r^ 



HOTEL VENDOME. SAN JOSE, CAL 

One of California's most attractive resorts. The start- 
ing point for Lick Observatory. The center of an 
orchard section of unparalleled beauty, through which 
finely graded and watered roads, for cycling and driv- 
ing, lead in every direction. The most thoroughly-kept 
and '..p-to-date hotel in Central California. 

For further information call at Traveler office, 20 
Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., or address 

GEO. P. SNELL, Manager. 



Arlington Hotel 



SANTA BARBARA 



The finest summer climate in the State. Sea bathing 
every day in the year. The best green turf golf links 
in California; five minutes' street car ride from the 
hotel. Special low rates during the summer. 

E. P. DUNN, Proprietor. 



Arcadia 

CAMPUS STATION 
Santa Cruz Mountains 

Delightfully .located, 
half a mile from 
Big Trees. New 
hotel newly fur- 
nished. Electric 
lighted. Hot and 
cold water. Porce- 
lain tubs. 

BATHING, FISHING,, HUNTING, TENNIS, Etc. 

Address THOMAS L. BELL, Felton P. O. 




HOTEL R0WARDENNAN 

Located in the Santa Cruz Mountains. 
9 miles from Santa Cruz. Round-Trip tickets 
from San Francisco, $3.00. 

Everything first-class. Over Ten Thousand 
Dollars spent in improvements this year. 
Headquarters for parties going into the Big 
Basin. Good livery. Competent drivers. 
Write for booklet to B. DICKINSON, Lessee, 

Ben Lomond, Cal. 



HOTEL EL MONTE l os Gatos, cai. 

John Nevill, Proprietor. 
American Plan. Strictly first-class. 




HOLLY OAKS 

SAUSALITO, CAL. 

Rates from $10 
per week upward. 



MRS. M. A. FARRAR, 

Proprietor. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 13, 1901. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC CO.--PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trains leave and are due to arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 
[Main Line. Foot of Market St.] 



Bl 



Fbom Jdne 16, 1901 



[arrive 



7:00 a Benicia, Sulsun, Elmlra. VacavlUe. Rumsey, and Sacramento 6:25 p 
7:30 a Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo. Napa, CallBtoga. Sanla Rosa... 6:25 p 

8:00 a Davis. Woodland, Knights Landing. Marysvllle, Orovllle 7:55 P 

8:00 a Atlantic Express. Ogden and East 12:25 p 

8:00 A NileB. Lathrop, Stocfcton 7:26 p 

8:00 a NileB. Mendota, Hanford, Vlsalla. Porterville- 4:55 p 

8:30 a bbasta Express — Davis, WilliamH, (for Bartlett Springs), Wil- 
lows. Red Bluff. Portland 7:55 P 

8:30 A San Jose. Livermore, Stockton, lone. Sacramento, PJacerville, 

Marysvllle. Chlco, Red Bluff. 4:25 P 

8 :30 a Oakdale. Chinese (Yosemite). Sonora, Carters . 4 :25 P 

9 00 a Hay wards, NileB, and way stations 11:55 A 

9:00 a Vallejo 12:25 P 

9:00 a Los Angeles Express— Martinez, Tracy. Lathrop, Stockton. 

Merced. FreBno, and Los Angeles 7:25 p 

9:30 a Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations 7:55 P 

10:00 a The Overland Limited— Ogden. Denver, Omaha, Chicago 6:55 p 

tl:00 p Sacramento River Steamers |5:00 A 

3:10 p Haywards. Ntles, and way Btations 7:55 p 

4:00 p Benicia. Winters, Sacramento, Woodland, Knights Landing. 

Mary«ville, Oroville : 10:55 a 

4:00 P Martinez. San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa. Calistoga, Santa Rom 9:25 a 

4:00 P Nlles. Livermore, Stockton, Lodi 12:25 p 

4 30p Haywards, Nlles, San Jose, Livermore t«:55 a 

4:30p Port Costa, Tracy. Lathrop, Stockton 10:25 A 

5:00 P The Owl Limited— Fresno. Tulare, Bakersfield, Saugus for 

Santa Barbara, Los Angeles 8:55 a 

5:00 p Martinez, Antloch, Stockton, Merced, Fresno l2:2"» p 

5:00 p Tosemlte 12 25 p 

5:30 P New Orleans Express — Mendota. Fresno, Bakemfield, Los 

Angeles, Deming, El Paso. New Orleans, and East 7:55 A 

6:00 p Haywards, Niles, and San Jose 7:55 A 

t6:00p Vallejo 11:25A 

6:00 P Oriental Mail— Ogden. Cheyenne, Omaha. Chicago 12:25 p 

6:00 P Oriental Mail- Ogden, Denver, St. Louis, Chicago 4:25 p 

7:00 P Oregon and California Express — Sacramento, Marysvllle, Red- 
ding. Portland, Puget Hound, and East 8:55 A 

8:05 p San Pablo, Port Costa, Martinez, and way stations , 11 :25 a 

18:05 P Vallejo 7:55 P 

Coast Division (Narrow Gauee). (Footof Market St.) 

t7;45 a Santa Cruz Excursion to Santa Cruz and principal way sta- 
tions . t*:P5 p 

8:15 A Newark. Centervllle. San Jose. Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz, and way ntatlons 5:50 p 

t2:15 P Newark. CeniervlHe. San Jose, New Alinaden. Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations 10:50 A 

4:15 P Newark. San Jose, Los Gatos t8:50 a 

c4:15 P Glenwood. Boulder Creek. Santa Cruz... e8:50 a 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— 17:15, 9:00, and 1 1 -00 
a.m. 1:00,3:00.5:15, p.m. 

From Oaki.anp — Foot of Broadway.— 16:00. 18:00, t8:05, 10;00 A. m. 12:00 
2:00, 4:00 p.m. 

Coast Division (Broad Gauge). (Third and Townsend streets.) 

6:10 a San Jose and way stations 6:30 P 

t7:00 a San Jose a>d way stations 1:30 p 

f7:00A New Al mad en ,. /4;ln p 

17:30 a Sunday Excursion for San Jose. Santa Cruz. Pacific Grove, 

and principal way stations J8:30 P 

8:00 a San JoBe. Tree Plnos. Santa Cruz, Paciflo Grove. Salinas, Sari 

Luis Oblspo.Santa Barbara.and principal Intermediate stations 7:30 P 

10:30a San Jose and way stations 4:10p 

11 : 30 a San Jose and wav slatlons . 5:30 p 

t2:45p San Mateo. Redwood. Menlo Park, Palo Alto, Santa Clara, Sun 
Jo e, TreePlnos. Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, and Pacific 

Grove tl0:45 a 

8:30 p San JoBe and way stations 6:30 a 

t4:15 p San Jose and principal way stations' ., 9-45 a 

t5:00 p San Jose, Los Gatos, and principal way stations T9:00 a 

5;S0p San Jose and p-inclpal way stat ons 8:36a 

6:00 P Redwood, San Jose, Gilroy, Salinas, Santa Barbara, Los An- 
gles imoo A 

6:00 p Del Monte, Monterey. Pacific Grove, Lompoc 10:00 a 

6:30 P San Jose and way stations t*:00 a 

ttU:45 P_8a n Jo s e and wa y stations 7:30p 

Afor Morning. p for Afternoon. t Sundays excepted- 
t Sundays only. f Tuesdays and Fridays. a Saturdays only. 
c Monday. c Saturday and Sunday. 

The Pacific Transfer Company w ni oall for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and other 
information, 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p. m., fo 

YOKOHAMA AND HONG KONG. 

calling at Kobe (Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hongkong 
with steamers for India, etc. No cargo received on board od day of sailing. 

CjPtic (via Honolulu) Friday, August 2, 1901 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Tuesday. Autust 27. 1901 

Doric (via Honolulu) Friday, September 20. 1901 

CjPTlc(vla nonolulu) Tuesday, October 15. 1901 

Roond Trip Tiokecs at Reduced Rates. 
For freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street 
corner First. D. D. STDBBS, General Manager. 



Sanla Fc 
Route 



7:20 A.M. LOCAL FOR FRESNO. BAKERSFIELD, 
and Intermediate points. 9 a.m. California Limited, 
with Sleepers, Dining and Observation Cars to Kansas 
City and Chicago. 4 :20 p. m. Local for Stockton. 8 p- m. 
Overland Express, with Palace and Tourist Sleepers and 
Chair Cars San Franolsco to Chicago. 



Chicago |N less than 3 Days 



From San Francisco 



At 10 a. m. 



CHICAGO, UNION PACIFIC AND 

NORTH-WESTERN LINE 

Double Drawing-Room Sleeping Cars, Buffet, Smoking and 
Library Cars, with barber. Dining Cars — meals a la carte. Daily 
Tourist Car Service and Personally Conducted Excursionsevery 
week from San Francisco at 6 p. m. The best of everything. 
R. R. RITCHIE, General Agent Pacific Coast, 

617 Market St., Palace Hotel, San Francisco. 

C. A. MURD0CK, PRINTERS*** 

Ne, 532 CLAY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

CALIFORNIA NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY CO. 

LESSEE 

SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC R'Y CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO 10 SAN RAFAEL. Tibdbon Feeev — Foot of Market Street 

WEEK DAYS-7:80. 9:00. 11:00 a.m.: 12:35.3:30.5:10,6:30 p.m. ThuradayB— 
Extra Trip at 11:30 p.m. baturdayB— Extra trips at 1:50 and 11:30 P.M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00 9:30. 11:00 A.M.: 1:30, 3:30, 5:00. 620 P.M. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO 

WEEK DAYS— 6:10, 7:50. 9:20. 11:10 a.m.: 12:45. 3:40. 5:10 P.M. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1 :55 and 6:35 P.M. 
SDNDAYS-8:10, 9:40 11:10 a.m., 1:40.3:40,5:05.6:25 p.m. 

Between San Francisco and SUiuetzen Park. Bame schedule as above. 



Leave San Francisco 



In Effect Nov. 7, 1900 I ArriveatSan Francisco 



Week days 


Sundays 


Destinations 


7:30 AM 


h:uo ah 


Novato 


3:30 ph 


9:30 ah 


Petal u ma 


5:10 ph 


5:00 I'm 


Santa Rosa 


7:30 am 




Fulton, Windsor, 
Healdsbnrg, Lytton, 


3:30 pm 


8:00 AH 


Geyservllle. Clo.erdale 



Sundays I Week days 

10:40 am I 8:40 am 
6:05 Pm 10:25 am 

7:35 pm I 6:22 PM 



10 .-25 , 



7:30 AM 


8:00 AM | 


Hopland, Ukiah 


1 7;J5 pm 


6:22 pm 


7:30 AM 
3:30 Pm 


8.00 AM I 


Guernevllle 


I 7:35 pm 


10 :25 am 

6:22 PM 


7:30 am 
5:10 Pm 


8:00 AM 1 
5:00 pm 1 


Sonoma 
Glen Ellen 


1 9:15 am 
1 6:05 pm 


8:40 am 

6:22 PM 


7:30 AM 
8:30 PM 


8:00 am 1 
5:00 l-M 1 


Seba?topol 


1 10:40 AM 
1 7:35 PM 


1 10:25 AM 
1 6:22 PM 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs and White Sulphur 
Springs; at Fulton for Altrurla; at Lytton for Lytton Springs; at Geyperville 
for Skaggs' Springs; at Cloverrlale tor the Geysers; at Hopland for Duncan 
Springs, Highland Springs, Eelseyville, Carlsbad Springs, Soda Bay. Lake- 
port, and Bartlett Springs; at Ukiah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga Springs. 
Blue Likes, Laurel Del Lake, Witter Springs, Upper Lake, Porno, Potter 
Valley, John Day's, Riverside, lierley's, Bucknell's, Sanhedrin Heights, 
Hullville, Boonrville, Phflo, Christine Soda Springs, Navarro, Whiteeboro, 
Albion. Little River, Orr's Springs. Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, Westport. 
Usal WilUts, Laytonville. CuramiDgs. Bell's Springs, Harris, Olatns, Doyer, Scotia 
and Eureka. 

Saturday- to- Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Suodays, Round 
Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 

TICKET OFFICE-r(»50 Market St., Chronicle Building. 
H. C. WHITING, Gen. Man. R. X. RYAN, Gen. Pass. Agent. 



Pacific Coast Steamship ■Co. s ^ ame F relea . veBroadwa y Whar ' 



so. 



San FranclBco. 

^^^ For Alaskan ports, II a. h. : July 5. ]0, IB, 20, 2- r >, 

^B^fefck Aug. I; change to company's *teamcrs at Seattle. 

lPn-?Tl% K '^ r B.C. and Pueet Sound PortH. 11 a. H.. July 5, 10, 

lw9M »1 ; "' Anc ' *' ftnd every fifUl day thereafter. 

dBC^W For Eureka (Huinbol.lt Bay), 1 :30 p.m., July 1, 0, 11, l<i, 

.r^^^^^K 21. 2G. 31. Aug ■'). and every lifth day therealler. 

^^^^ For San Diego, stopping only at Santa Barbara, Port 
Lob Angeles, Redondo (Los Angeles). Steamer "Santa Rosa," Sundays 
9 a. h.; steamer "Corona." Wednesdays 9 a.m.. 

For Los Angeles, calling at Santa Cruz. Monterey. San Simeon, Cayueos. 
Port Harford (San Luis Ob.spo). Gaviota. Santa Barbara. Ventura, Hue- 
neme. San Pedro. East San Pedro, and 'Newport (* Coos Bay only}. 
Steamer "Coos Bay," Saturdays. 9 a.m.; Steamer " Bonlta." Tuesdays. 

9 A.H. 

For Mexican Ports. 10a.ii., 7th of each month- 
For further Information obtain Company's folder. 

The company reserves the right to change Bteamers, sailing dates, and 
hours of sailing, without previous notiCd. 
TICKET OFFICE-No, 4 New Montgomery Btreet (Palace Hotel). 
G00DALL, PERKINS & CO.. Gen. Agts. 10 Market St.. San Francisco 

SS " Sierra," Thursday. Aug 1. 10 a. m. 

SS " Australia," for Tahiti. TueB.. Aug 6. h> tt>m , 

SS " Mariposa." Saturday. Aug 10, at 2 p. m. 

1 Ine to Coolgardie. AuBtralla, and Capetown, 

South Africa, 

J. D. SpRECKELS A BROS. CO.. 
Agents, 613 Market Street. Freight Office. 327 
Market St., San Francisco. 




Price ptr cop/, 10 cenU. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20. 1856. 



Annual Subscription, |4.00 



News Better 




Volume LXIII. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 20, 1901. 



Number 3. 



Printed and published everv Saturday by the proprietor, FRED 
MARKIOTT. 5S Kearny street, San Francisco. Entered at San Fran- 
cisco Postofflce a9 sccnnd-clats matter. 

The office of the S. F. News LFHTER In London Eng.. Is at SO Cornhill 
K. C, London, England, (Qeorgi , Representatives!, where 

information may be obtained regarding subscriptions and advertising 
rate*. Parts, France— Office, No. 37 Avenue de L'Opera. 

All social Items, announcements, advertising or other matter, intended for 
publication in the current number of the NEWS LETTER should be 
sent to this office not later than 6 p.m. Thursday- 



It cost $30,000 to find that the time lock on the Mint was 
out of order. 



The fishing season is now at its height, and Baron Mun- 
chausen is in enormous demand at our public library. 



The Democrats of Ohio are endorsing Bryan. A State 
that can turn out a President ought to do better than that. 



The strikers will receive $2,000,000 per month from the 
American Federation of Labor. That is about as profitable 
as working. 



The Examiner boys' race around the world is practically 
finished, and we will all be given a space to recuperate. It 
i.as been a great strain on our nerves. 



While the State Board of Barber Commissioners is at it 
reforming the profession tonsorial, they might see to it 
that an qualified barbers visit the State Dental Board and 
have their voices pulled. 



The railroads might offer excursion rates to Botldn wit- 
nesses who will probably be called upon to make periodical 
tiips from New Jersey to this coast for some years to 
come. 



Last Sunday a Denison, Texas, preacher prayed for rain. 
That night a storm came up that completely wrecked the 
church. Moral: Don't interfere with the workings of Provi- 
dence. 



Frank Gillette, of "Walla Walla, drank three large beer 
glasses of whiskey in rapid succession the other day. He 
tried to get more, but it wasn't necessary — what he took 
killed him. 



While the discovery of the secret service agents that 
there were two men in the Mint steal may be of interest, 
it would be more to the point if they would mention who 
those two men were. 



Judge Bennett, of Sonoma, has sentenced Peter McGlade 
to eight years at San Quentin. No reflections on San Fran- 
cisco's judiciary — but wouldn't it be a good plan to keep 
Judge Bennett here? 



Minister Conger is on his way back to China. He is not 
yet decided whether he will run for Governor of Iowa or not. 
If there is another siege of Peking, the Governorship of 
Iowa may not be left to Mr. Conger's decision. 



Later events have proven that the Yosemite Commission 
is not a hody of humorists and that they actually intend to 
turn the Yosemite Valley into a midway plaissance and the 
Yosemite falls into an electric fountain. 



Miss Lizzie Gross of Oakland has taken the vii. Miss 
Gross' action is taken because her little brother is a naughty 
boy and needs praying for. It Is a beautiful thing to be a 
martyr, but It seems that this young lad; bag chosen a very 
small cause for her devotion. 



Two stabbings and a shooting as a climax to the French 
ball at the Chutes last Sunday night leads us to the conclu- 
sion that some of the revelers must have imagined that the 
c'ance was to celebrate the Reign of Terror rather than the 
Fall of the Bastile. 



King Oscar of Sweden has decided that kings are not di- 
vine, but that, in common with other mortals, they are 
descended from monkeys. The press declares that Oscar 
has been studying Darwin. Personally we believe that he 
has been studying Wilhelm. 



Although the women who came into court to claim the 
inmates of the John Biter baby farm came in for their share 
of public sympathy, is is yet worthy of remark that these 
women have through their carelessness or ignorance made 
the baby farm a possibility. 



White laborers and Japanese are shooting each other in 
the North, black laborers and Mexicans are openly warring 
in the South. The Indian wars of the past seem tame to us, 
now that the New World doctrine, "All men are free and 
equal" is becoming a reality among us. 



Bill is boring and borrowing again. This enterprising 
burglar laid low for two weeks, but now he is at it with his 
little brace and bit, and houses in the Western Addition 
are suffering. The police are much interested in Bill, but 
he seems to be of a retiring disposition, unwilling to make 
acquaintances. 



The bunco men feel that they have a grievance against the 
city. Every time a big crowd comes into town the police 
gather in these plausible, light-fingered gentry, and hold 
them until all chances for graft are over. What's the good 
in having visitors if we let them take any money away? 



A band of Parisian thieves have been recently arrested for 
conspiring to systematically rob American women of the 
jewels with which they are so notoriously laden. It was a 
shame to lock them up. The United States Government 
ought to give those observing thieves a pension for attempt- 
ing, at least, to discourage a blatant national vice. 



Even if the Pennsylvania rowers didn't beat Leander, 
they evidently frightened them, as a move is on foot now 
to have no foreigners compete hereafter in the boat races 
at Henley. Our cousins needn't be afraid that we will ever 
bar their yachts — unless it's because they don't build one 
fast enough to make it interesting for us. 



A $5,000 dollar bronze statue of the late Hall McAllister 
is soon to be erected near the New City Hall, $1,000 having 
been raised by distinguished jurists in this city. The funds 
to be appropriated are large enough to insure an ornament 
to the city; but whether the proposed statue will be a work 
of art will, of course, all depend on the sculptor who does 
the work. The Committee in charge would do well to choose 
a jury of artists to judge the plans turned in. A poor 
statue is a poor tribute to a great man's memory. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1901. 



THE LABOR TROUBLES. 

The labor elements are out on a lark. We doubt that any 
of them take their present proceedings very seriously. The 
Federated Machinists have voted their members — or they 
so report — two million dollars a month as long as the strike 
lasts. With their present ease and leisure they ought to 
be able to get a great deal of fun out of the expenditure of 
that large sum monthly. They would be fools to resume the 
earning of their living by the sweat of their brows so long 
as the newer and simpler way continues. Those of us who 
have to keep toiling on, and sometimes at harder work than 
any of them ever knew, can but look on at their ability to 
take a long "day off," with plenty of money to enjoy it, with 
feelings of envy. Certainly men who can afford to quit work 
and play ball whenever they are so minded, are entitled to 
no sympathy, and should seek to invoke none. At the same 
time their rose is not without its thorn. They are eating 
up the honey that they may sorely need when the winter of 
their discontent comes around, as it surely will. They are 
in the midst of good times now, but bad ones will come, and 
mainly through the course they are now pursuing. They 
are paralyzing trade, driving capital in search of safer con- 
ditions, setting back the hands on the dial of progress, and 
although they may not think so, they are doing their level 
best to render profitable investments in this country impossi- 
ble, and to bring back the "dollar-a-day" wage. And, after 
all, what is their grievance now? Ostensibly they are on 
strike because they want an increase of wages and a nine 
hours day. Very well — those two things have been conceded 
to them, as all who have followed the course of events know. 
But what they wanted, and the real thing they wanted, was 
something else. They wanted to be put in a position to be 
able to boss their employers for all time to come. They 
wanted all non-union workmen discharged, and a guarantee 
that all mills should be unionized. That's the milk in the 
cocoanut. There are scores of mills in which the operatives 
prefer to keep out of the unions. They do not care to be 
"called out" at anybody's dictum; they prefer a condition oi 
peace to one of armed rebellion against their employers, 
and they do not care to support a lot of demagogues bent 
upon living on their earnings. The employers are bound in 
good conscience to stand by the men who stood by them, 
and they are doing it. Hence the strike. English manufac- 
turers declare that they made a fatal mistake last year 
when they yielded the point to employ only union men. 
Their capital is now at the mercy of unconscionable labor 
leaders. Is this country to repeat that experience? 



THE FUTURE OF CHINESE EXCLUSION. 

That the Chinese act would be renewed seemed likely until 
lately. Conservative citizens of the great Caucasian family 
were anxious that members of their own race should do the 
work of this great country, and be the principal sharers in 
its progress and prosperity. But a changed feeling has been 
rapidly growing during the past few months. The course of 
the labor unions has caused it. If Caucasians will not work, 
and if the wheels of commerce must go on, as they must, 
then reliable labor must be substituted, even though it be 
Mongolian. That is how hard-headed men are putting the 
case, and it is a way that is not susceptible of an answer. 
It compels the conviction of all conscientious men interested 
in the industrial existence and progress of the nation. 
Therefore there is a wide-spread feeling that the exclusion 
of the Chinese should cease with this year. California needs 
laoor, and labor it must have at all hazards. It would so 
vote to-morrow. The Labor Council of San Francisco is 
so well assured on that point that it is trying to inveigle 
the members of the Epworth League into becoming Chinese 
exclusionists. It is a curious quarter to expect recruits 
from If it were to succeed, we think Minister Wu could be 
depended upon to so represent matters in China as to 
cause retaliation; at any rate, so far as Methodist mission- 
aries are concerned. But the Labor Council will have its 
rains for its gains. The Epworth League wants to Christian- 
ize and not persecute the Chinese. Moreover, it is not a po- 
litical organization. Chinese are wanted in all sorts of po- 
sitions, and all over the country. There is not a large city 
in the union but that would be better, cleaner and sweeter 
for a certain number of Chinese domestics. We want them 
in our restaurants right now, for since the return of the 



striking waiters to work their conduct is in many instances 
unbearable. The servant girl question is not in issue, for 
women find higher and better employment. Every year 
California has trouble over the picking of its large fruit 
crop. It would absolutely rot on the trees if it were not for 
tne Chinese, and with an increased area of cultivation, more 
of them have become a necessity. We hear this season of 
young ladies of Stanford University accepting service in the 
fruit canneries, they being influenced thereto by motives of 
sentiment, knowing that all the fruit could not be otherwise 
handled. From this state of things California cries aloud for 
relief. If it be thought that there would be too large a supply 
of immigrants at first, which is not at all probable, for they 
are wanted all over the country, their number could be re- 
stricted for a time. The labor unions are building better 
than they know. The little brown man is to be the labor 
machine of the world. He has come to stay. His usefulness 
and the recent action of the powers at Peking, render his 
longer exclusion impossible. 



OUR SHARP-SHOOTING VISITORS. 

This week San Francisco has been glad to entertain 
over three thousand members of the National Shooting Bund. 
This organization, considering its recent birth, has grown 
to wonderful proportions. It was only eight years ago that 
the prominent riflemen of the country met in New York and 
decided to form a federation of rifle clubs throughout the 
country, to hold national contests every three years. The 
first one was held in New York in 1895, the second at Glen- 
dale ParK in 1898, and the third one is now being held in San 
Francisco. This organization is distinctly German, and its 
members are recruited from the very best people of that 
nationality. Necessarily they are all men of steady nerve, 
cool and level-headed — ideal citizens in times of peace and 
ideal soldiers in time of war. We could not ask for a visit 
from a belter class of people, and that they are appreciated 
here is plainly evidenced by the efforts that have been put 
lorth to properly entertain them. In addition to the lavish 
hospitality they have received at our'hands many valuable 
prizes and cups have been put up. All week the rifles have 
tracked merrily at Shell Mound, and some notable scores 
have been made. We hope the visitors carry away as good 
an impression as they have made. 



THE EPWORTH LEAGUERS ENJOYING THEMSELVES. 

San Francisco has manifestly become a rallying point 
for all sorts and conditions of men. aye. and of women, too. 
Us attractions appear to be appreciated as are not those of 
any other city in the union. California's boundless hospi- 
tality, glorious climate, inspiring scenery, tempting fruits, 
romantic history, and its well-advertised resources generally, 
render it a land to be, at least, once seen, and never forgot- 
ten. It has accordingly come to pass that no American, no 
matter in what town, county or State he may reside, expects 
to die without having visited these golden shores. Hence, 
we have had at different times during recent years, about all 
th° great combinations of men of which our country is so 
prolific, in our midst. The Knights Templar from every- 
where, the Grand Army of the Republic, the school teachers 
or the United States, the going and coming soldiers of the 
Philippine war, and now that other band of soldiers, who 
have enlisted under the banners of the cross — the Epworth 
Leaguers — have all been here, making us feel bigger, 
brighter and better for their presence. The Epworth folks 
have crowded our streets all week, given the greatest con- 
cert ever heard in America, in our vast Pavilion, filled our 
pulpits witn preachers, teachers and orators of the highest 
ability, monopolized our unsurpassed hotel accommodation, 
and as if that were not enough, have swarmed over into our 
homes and hearts until we felt like exclaiming with one of 
old, "It is good to be here!" The Epworth Leaguers are a 
wonderful lot of people, who bitt fair to become as numerous 
as the sands on the sea shores. Sober and industrious at 
home, they brought money to spend, and that was not the 
least of their attractions in our eyes. They visited the 
curio stores and flower stands and purchased liberally. One 
thing they did that was unexpected. They ruined the saloon 
business for a week. They did not drink themselves, and 
did not much like those of us who did, and as a compliment 
lo their principles, our always chivalrous fathers and 



Ji 'y 29. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



■ rs follow. .1 their Siample, and San Franrlmo. f.> r the 
Brat limp In II* existence, was well nigh a dry town ■' 
net Know how many Leaguers than were Kilty thousand 

railroad tickets. I'm tlf-m 
at thirty thousand In order lo avoid the suspicion of 
M-ratlon which Is not becoming In connection with K|> 
worth League matters, and then we shall ! tatned 

•y big crowd, nnd as they all say. to their entin 
Now that their meetings are about ended. a 
surne they will spread themselves over the State and spy 
out— not the nakedness — but the fruitfulness of the land. 
They will And themselves in the land of Canaan, and if a 
roodly number of them do not cast in their lot in this glor- 
ious lano of promise, we can only say it will be because they 
<iO not know a good thing when they see it. To those who 
return to the bosoms of their families, we wish a safe and 
pleasant trip, and may they come again. 



LORD ROSEBERRY AND THE LIBERAL PARTY. 

Lord Rosebery nas at last taken the plunge that has long 
been expected of him. The unquestioned leader, if he chose 
to lead, of the Liberal Party, he disowns one half of the rank 
and file, and declares that he will have none of them. The 
Liberal Party, he insists, "can only become a power When 
it has an undivided mind on the imperial questions which 
are at tnis moment embodied in the war." After asserting 
mat "the whole empire had rallied to the war," he contends 
that it is not politics, nor statesmanship, nor patriotism, for 

handful of irreconcilable partisans to try to prevent its be- 
ing brought to a successful issue. "What is the attitude of 
the present Liberal party?" he asks. "Neutrality and an 
open mind," he replies, and says that "this is an impossible 
attitude, and spells impotence. No party can exist on such 
conditions." He declares that "uie difference will not cease 
to operate when the war is over, because statesmen who dis- 
sociate themselves from their country in the hour of peril, 
such as is the war in which the whole nation strives to suffer 
together, dissociate themselves for a much longer period 
than they think." Such statesmen, he avers, "cut them- 
selves off from the irrevocable policy of the empire, and de- 
liberately refuse to encourage, much less participate in its 
achievements." He therefore sees no future for the Liberal 
Party as at present constituted. It has no part or lot in the 
national life, as the people have determined to live it. 
'i nere is no mistaking that language. It practically dissolves 
the Liberal Party, liberates its members from their party 
allegiance, and at the first opportunity will probably rele- 
gate Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman, Sir William Harcourt, 
and Mr. John Morley to the ranks of private citizens. Mr. 
Asquith, a remarkably promising man, Sir Henry Fowler, 
and Sir Edward Gray would remain, and probably form 
the nucleus of a third party, if only Lord Rosebery will con- 
sent to lead it. The London Times calls upon him to "place 
his grand abilities at the service of his country, by throw- 
ing himself, heart and soul, into the work of converting 
the Liberal Party to the policy in which he believes." It 
alludes to his singular advantages — birth, ability, and nation- 
ality — for playing an important part at a critical time. But 
the Conservatives are not dead yet. They have still a ma- 
jority of about one hundred and fifty, and a Parliament that 
has yet six years to run. 



SPRING VALLEY AND YELLOW LOGIC. 

On the first day of January, 1900, the publisher of one of 
the most pronouncedly yellow daily newspapers issued in 
this community expressed himself, over his own signature, 
to this effect: 

"The nineteenth century has seen the beginning of the 
power and usefulness of the press. The twentieth cen- 
tury will see its growth and glory. 'Government by news- 
I apers,' sometimes slightingly spoken of to-day, will be real- 
ized in the twentieth century." 

Apparently the young gentleman who formulated that con- 
ception of the future position of the newspaper press in or- 
ganized society is working upon the theory that the time for 
carrying it out is already at hand. Within the past two 
months or so he has denounced a prominent member of the 
bar, who is believed to have political aspirations, because he 
accepted a retainer to represent in court persons who were 
contesting the carrying out of a dictum issued by the 



I paper of the JraUOH he implied 

logic of this position I ht to repn 

met Is disapproved ■•( bj yellow Journalism. 
Ian has adranced a step oi two farther within 

II.. past lOW clays. II.- i,.. , right of 

nil Injured person or Intel. . n the 
If M K does not consider that mm injury baa 1 n in: 1 

This quaint doctrine was embodied In an article In which 
the spring Valley Water Company was assailed for dtapul 
bag in ■ legal way the validity of the recent water ral 

dloance. If we are t,> Delleve the yellow logician, the ordi- 

in question having been approved by the yellow i 
it is down-right treason for the company to appeal to 
courts. 'Government by newspapers" having arrived, the 

• ourta have lost jurisdiction. Getting down to the facts 
Which lie behind the litigation the yellow logician Is equally 
btrablsmlcal and quaint. He asserts that the company is 
Beektng to earn a moderate interest on the present value 
of its property, and that it is only entitled to returns on the 
original cost of the property, and such money as has been 
expended in bringing it to its present state of efficiency. 
He does not dispute the correctness of the present valua- 
tion of the company's property. Starting out with the as- 
sumption (which cannot be disputed) that the Spring Valley 
Water Company enjoys the same rights and privileges that 
any other corporation, individual or association of individuals 
does, let us take a pointed illustration or two and see where 
this theory leads us to. Suppose the Hearst estate should 
buy a piece of real estate for ten thousand dollars and 
should, by the judicious expenditure of twenty thousand 
dollars upon it. enhance the market value of the property to 
one hundred thousand dollars, would not the estate own the 
increase and be entitled to its earnings? Suppose, again, 
that young Mr. Hearst should buy a paper for thirty thou- 
sand dollars and should, by an expenditure of two hundred 
thousand dollars, make it worth a million, would he not 
be entitled to the increase and the profits thereof? Has the 
fact that this is the century of "Government by newspapers" 
given him rights that the Spring Valley Water Company 
does not possess? 



THE BRITISH, CANADIAN AND AUSTRALIAN CABLE. 
Mr. Chamberlain, in reply to a question in the House of 
Commons, put to him on Monday evening last, gave out the 
first official information we have had as to the progress 
being made in preparing to lay a cable down the Pacific 
from Vancouver to Australia. That surveys had proven the 
route to be practicable, and that a contract had been signed 
for the performance of the work, we knew already. We did 
not know, however, what progress, if any, had been made. 
It is satisfactory to know on the highest authority that the 
contractors are proving themselves equal to their task, 
are making excellent progress, and that the cable will be 
in full operation toward the end of the next year. Mr. Cham- 
berlain stated that the landing places at Vancouver, Nor- 
lolk Island, and Australia, had already been carefully sur- 
veyed and determined upon. We are glad to notice one very 
suggestive omission. He did not say anything about the 
landing place at Fanning Island, a few miles south of Hono- 
lulu. Can this mean that our Government is negotiat- 
ing to have the cable connect with Hawaii? It is to be sin- 
cerely hoped that it does. This journal has more than 
once suggested that course. It may be taken for granted, 
if we can but make up our mind to ask for the concession, 
a will be readily granted. But the initiative must come from 
us. The other, countries interested did what they could long 
ago to make connection with the Hawaiian Islands. That 
was part of their original plan, and it is not their fault that 
it is not being carried out. Very ungraciously they were 
refused the privilege of landing at that point by President 
Dole, who thought thereby to ingratiate himself with the 
Government of the United States. We cannot believe that 
he received, as he has more than once intimated, a hint that 
such a course would be agreeable to Washington. It is not 
in keeping with the precedents we have already established 
to prevent the landing of cables on our shores by any coun- 
try. They are news agents, intelligence disseminators, and 
commerce winners, of which we cannot have too many. We 
cannot be too closely in touch with the rest of the world now 
that we are a world power. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1901. 



JURY AND CASE FIXERS. 
Judge Fritz has at last broken out against two "case 
fixers," of whose kind there has long been too many around 
our Police Courts. A miserable woman, who does not ap- 
pear to have enjoyed "police protection," was hauleJ up for 
something or other, and admitted to bail. She subsequently 
testified that she had been waited upon by the fixer in the 
case, and told that she must pay him twenty dollars if she 
wanted to get out of her scrape. She did not own that 
much money, and was then assured that the trouble could 
be "fixed" for ten dollars. The impudent rascal claimed that 
Judge Fitz and he were old schoolfellows, and that he 
had influence in that quarter. Of course he falsified. The 
woman told a straight story, and the Court believed her. 
He promptly sent the would-be "fixer" to jail for contempt 
of Court, and ordered a pal "to leave the Court-room and 
never appear again, or he would be sent up for vagrancy." 
All of which was eminently proper, and marked out a new 
departure that, if followed up with persistency, will ulti- 
mately render the atmosphere of our Police Courts less 
l'estilential than heretofore. The miserable, hungry horde 
of shysters, case-fixing policemen, and lazy bums who are too 
much tolerated around the prison corridors, are a reflection 
upon the good conduct of our Police Courts, and as such 
cannot too soon be driven to find other quarters. So long 
as they are apparently welcome where they are, or at any 
rate are not disturbed, prosecuting officers, and even the 
Juages themselves, must not complain if people wonder why 
they appear satisfied with their environment. 



A MINISTER TO JAPAN. 

The choice of a minister to represent this country in 
Japan is a matter that is agitating politicians at present, 
and President McKinley's action in the matter is awaited 
with much anxiety. It is a post of more than ordinary im- 
portance, and consequently candidates are numerous. 

At the present time. General W. H. L. Barnes of San 
Francisco is the one most frequently and favorably men- 
tioned for the post, and his friends have strong hopes that 
the prize will fall to him. They are backing up their feeling 
in the matter by hard work in his behalf. 

General Barnes would certainly make an ideal diplomat. 
He has all the qualities required in so important a position. 
His fame as an orator extends all over the United States, 
and as a lawyer he has few peers. His long public life has 
made him a thorough man of affairs, who would kuow how 
to cope with any conditions that might arise. Added to 
all this he is a soldier and gentleman in .the highest sense 
of the terms. 

There are few who have done the Republicans of California 
such service as has General Barnes. For years he has been 
on the political firing line, always more than ready to do his 
share toward the party to which he has been so loyal. 
He has never been a sulker, and any personal disappointment 
he may have suffered at any time has not prevented him al- 
ways putting forth his best efforts. It is no more than fitting 
that he should have substantial recognition. 



AS TO THE LAW AGAINST "CORNERS." 
Corners in wheat, stocks, or in anything that is saleable, 
are had, contrary to public policy, and ought to be estopped 
by law. It is believed by sound lawyers that the law is al- 
ready sufficient for that purpose, hut it needs to be judi- 
cially interpreted. A mere preliminary injunction issued by 
a New York Court, against enforcing a contract to deliver 
cornered stock in the late Northern Pacific deal, so fright- 
ti.ed the "short buyers" that they settled out of Court, by 
letting the sellers out of their dangerous hole, instead of 
squeezing them to death, as is the practice in such cases. 
The principle involved is not by any means an obscure one. 
In a contract that proves impossible of fulfillment the con- 
tractor cannot be held to its performance, and he is relieved 
of all obligations in the premises. If persons who are work- 
ing up a corner know that they have obtained all the availa- 
ble shares of a stock, or supply of a product, and still agree 
to buy from persons who do not know, and who cannot possi- 
bly get it for delivery, the principle of equity must apply that 
the contract cannot be enforced, or the forfeiture exacted. 
The same rule would doubtless hold good in cases where an 
exorbitant price is attempted to be extorted by a person 



agreeing to buy, he knowing that he had forced it to an un- 
reasonable one. The New York lawyers appear to have been 
of the opinion that an injunction would lie in such cases, 
and the pity is that the question was not allowed to be judi- 
cially determined. Such a proceeding would be simple and 
prompt. In most instances, the mere granting of the pre- 
liminary injunction would break the corner. The root of 
the evil, however, is in the practice of selling "short." No 
man ought to be allowed to sell what he has not got, and 
which he does not know he can buy. It is not necessary to 
waste sympathy on the short seller at all. He is in the posi- 
tion of the gambler who goes into the game with his eyes 
open, and loses. He has no right to squeal. The demorali- 
zation of trade, and the injury to public morals which he 
causes, are, however, different matters, about which Con- 
gress will legislate some day. 



PREFERENCES IN BANKRUPT CASES. 

The United States Supreme Court recently rendered an 
interpretation of the new bankruptcy law that is causing 
much discussion among traders in our Eastern States. The 
vital clause in the law is the one forbidding the giving of pre- 
ferences to certain creditors to the injury of others, and the 
Highest Appellate Court has now upheld this clause in a way 
that gives it even greater force than its authors contem- 
plated. The case passed upon was one in which a Chicago 
firm, now bankrupt, bought of a New York house a parcel of 
goods, within four months of its assignment, paying thereon 
$1,300. The whole purchase amounted to $4,300. The 
trustees of the bankrupt firm took the position tnat the New 
York house must return the $1,300, or lose its right to share 
in the subsequent equal division among the creditors of 
the proceeds of the bankrupt's remaining estate. The Su- 
preme Court holds that to be a correct interpretation of the 
law. The National Credit Association, at a recent meeting 
in Cleveland, has in consequence adopted a resolution calling 
for such an amendment of the bankruptcy act as will pre- 
vent the "construing of payments on account made within 
4 months of the adjudication in bankruptcy as preferences, 
which, unless surrendered, bar the creditor from any further 
interest in the estate." It is easy to comprehend the feeling 
which led to the adoption of that resolution. It is hard on a 
wholesale dealer to be compelled to return money which he 
has honestly taken in the ordinary course of business, and 
without the payment of which he probably would not have 
given any credit at all. Yet there is another side to the ques- 
tion. It is desirable to stop fraudulent perferences at all 
hazards. They are the bane of honest and legitimate 
trading. The fear of them prevents many an honest man 
from getting credit, and to that extent injures business. 



A JUDGE LECTURES A BAR ASSOCIATION. 
It is something new to find an elective judge delivering a 
sober, sedate, but scathing address to the Bar Association of 
his own judicial district. It is never attempted here in Cali- 
fornia, where judges are too often beholden to lawyers for 
procuring them nominations. Judge Gaynor, of the Supreme 
Court of New York, has opinions and is not afraid to ex- 
press them. He referred to a tampering with juries which 
he said was "evident" and amounted to a "serious breakdown 
in the administration of justice." He implied that mem- 
bers of the bar were largely responsible for this lamentable 
state of affairs, and declared that "the Bar Association 
was comatose, lethargic and lifeless." A justice of the 
Supreme Court ought to know, when he says he does. It is 
doubtful if Bar Associations in these days understand what 
in older and better times they were created for. Rascality 
on the part of legal lights — heaven save the mark! — is 
practiced in our courts five days in the week and all the year 
round, Out does anybody remember more than one case in 
which the Bar Association interfered? Is it true, or not, 
that most of the really honorable members of the profession 
withhold their services and influence from the local Bar 
Association, because there are too many of the deservedly 
least influential lawyers members of it? We have heard it 
so stated by members of the profession of the highest stand- 
ing. It is unquestionably true that there is too much "sharp 
practice" in our courts, and that it is not as sternly frowned 
down as it ought to be. It would be worth an effort to find 
and elect a Judge Gaynor for a full term. 



July 20. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Wha.t the Sea Serpent Sees 



By Lady Algy. 



■Then I modestly covered my face with my hands and 
peeped through my Angers." It was very, lathe 

morning, and some of the girls had slipped down in U 
house for a swim. Even the sun. who took one glance 
through the window, decided he'd better draw his Cloud CUT- 
tains and finish his nap. Really, the first vision of the Kills 
in their bathing suits is a trifle disconcerting. After a little 
scrutiny, though, you become accustomed to them and decide 
that they were very sensible to slip away from the hotel 
before mere man is astir, for of a truth some of our modish 
maids and matrons do not remind one of Venus taking her 
morning dip. They are guiltless of curves, and no one would 
come miles to see their elbows. 

It is the shank of the season now at Del Monte, — the crowd 
is yet to come. But there were half a dozen girls splashing 
la the tank, and they enjoyed their stolen swim as much as 
1 did my role of spectator. To one thing I will attest — their 
complexions are not put up in bottles, but are the genuine, 
blown in the skin affairs. A tall, slender girl on dry land, 
is an elongated angle in a bathing suit. When 1 saw 
Therese Morgan disguised as a mermaid I fully appreciated 
the cleverness of her modiste. I thought of Therese in that 
famous hand-painted pink gown that made every other dress 
in the room look a bit commonplace. Therese always looked 
stunning in that gown, and the bathing suit reminded me of 
it — by contrast. 

Helen Wagner was no less surprising in her bathing suit. 
Helen is delicately pretty in an afternoon or evening gown, 
but in a bathing suit she looks ill-fed. Girls should be fat- 
tened up for the seashore, even as turkeys are stuffed for 
Thanksgiving. The Parrott girls, plump and dimpled, are 
very fetching in bathing suits, but most of us had best not 
hang our clothes on the hickory limb, much less go near 
the water. If you would have your illusions about the figure 
of the hour washed out just see it in a bathing suit. We have 
aieted and exercised and massaged to attain it. We are 
reed-like, but must not bend to the waves. Bathing suits 
don't suit the present style of beauty. Fancy Mrs. Gus Tay- 
lor, for instance — no, let's not. I don't think she'd want us to. 

The bathing suits themselves are unusually pretty this 
season. There was a bright red one that would be dazzling 
on the beach. Even in the tank it was very smart. The 
big sailor collar was embroidered in large gold anchors on 
the four corners, and the white vest had a single red anchor 
embroidered in the center. The skirt with its box plait in 
front and side plaits over the hips and back, was finished 
with a white belt that sloped in front, preserving the long- 
waisted effect. The red silk stockings had anchors instead 
of clocks, and a gay red bandana hid the coils of brown hair, 
but allowed saucy ringlets to stray out. 

Another pretty bathing suit was of brown with buff colored 
trimmings. The best white wool turns a bilious yellow in 
salt water, and the huff is a rather happy thought. A broad 
stripe of pale blue and one of white was the background 
of a giddy suit, but with its trimmings of blue embroidered 
in white silk, it was very effective. An olive green suit 
was trimmed in white — bands of wide white braid crossing 
at the shoulders served as sleeves, and the collar was cross- 
barred with narrow white braid. 

The latest fad is tor shoes, belt and hat to match — the 
shoes and belt preferably of the same material, and the 
hat of like shade. A white linen gown worn by a Menlo 
belle, has a hat composed entirely of red roses, while the 
shoes and belt are of red morocco. An ashes of roses gown 
has a belt of white deerskin; boots of the same material, 
and a hat of white hydrangeas complete the costume. 

A pretty forenoon costume that a Burlinganie matron is 
wearing is a brown straw linen, embroidered in chocolate 
brown. Her straw hat was trimmed with cherries — red, 
black and white, relieved by the tender green cherry leaves. 
The effect was charming. Apropos of country hats, green 
silk tissue veils of a soft emerald color are much affected in 
the Bast, and ought to be deservedly popular out here where 
tno sun is insolent, it not as bad as in the East. 



Th ' rampant durln. 

now is the lime I . -,. 

make thet mmon 

ittfe thai onl] n plump , really 

ih- plumes must be the n il thing, and 
•i nevei masquerade In theli ..mbie 

milliner tells me thai the dealers he 

irs tifty per cent, and they are .-till going up. 
would be advisable to go early t.> buy your winter plumes 
tor there's going to be a rush. 



Doolcy has said that whisky doesn't sustain life but 

thai it makes lif.- sustainable. He meant J. p. c 
whisky, it is undoubtedly the best brand on the market 
and is always called for by people of good tatse. The best 
bars keep J. F. Cutter. E. Martin & Co., :, I First street 
are the sole agents for the United States. 



Carpet cleaning has always been a trial of house- 

1 ■ ping, but since people have found how well and cheaply 
the work can be done at Spaulding's Carpet Cleaning 
Works, 353 Tehama street, the problem has been solved. 
They clean carpets thoroughly without any injury to the 
goods. They call for and deliver work, and promptness is 
their motto. 



To protect your face from the wind and sun use 

Camelline. It is used and endorsed by Mrs. Kendall, Mrs. 
Terry, Adelina Patti, and numerous others. It cannot be 
excelled for keeping the skin fresh and clear. 



California Limited 



75 hours 



to 



Chicago 



No change of Cars and 
the most perfect service. 
Leaves every Monday and 
Thursday at 9 a.m. 



on 



Santa Fe 



Ticket office at 641 Market St. 
and at Ferry Depot. 



"I've prescribed 
enough . . . 



Bethesda 



to swim in.' 



—Dr. Shrady. 274 Lexington avenue. New York 

L. CAHEN & SON, Agents, Wholesale Liquer Dealers, 

Send for Pamphle 418 Sacramento Street, 

WIHI. WILLIAMS & SONS 

(LTD.) OF ABERDEEN. 

Scotcl^Whisky 

Importers - MACONDRAY & CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1901. 




Pleasured 
Wand 

GJeoieynowand but Measure's 



There does not seem to be any letting down to the busi- 
ness at the Orpheum. and there is certainly no letting down 
in the quality ot the shows presented there. As I remarked 
last week, the summer season, which means closed houses in 
the East, means good shows and full houses here, although 
the number of rusticating San Franciscans is said to be 
greater this year than ever before. The patrons of the 
Orpheum are not, perhaps, as a class, the sojourners at the 
seaside and the springs, and therefore the torrid season 
does not work so much harm to the box office of the O'Far- 
rel street house; and it is well for those of us "who in sad 
cities dwell" that such a good line of vaudeville is afforded 
us by way of recreation. I found the penultimate programme 
at the Orpheum good from top to bottom, although there was 
no unusual star to brighten it. This week the star has 
risen in the pretty person of Etta Butler, and the rest of the 
bill is practically impregnable.- The Chevalier Enrico Mario 
Scognamillo, 'cellist, is a weak spot, were he to be judged 
by any but a vaudeville standard. He has facility and accu- 
racy, but he neither plays down to a popular audience 
nor by his musicianship does he uplift his hearers to an ap- 
preciation of good music as he might were he possessed of 
temperament and true mastery. If we must have musical 
virtuosi on the variety stage it behooves them to be at once 
popular and authoritative. Music is maltreated by a multi- 
tude of mountebanks, with their xylophones, sleigh-bells and 
concertinas, to say nothing of fake violinists and pseudo- 
pianists. We accept them and their tricks for what they 
are worth, and many of them are entertaining in their comi- 
cal way; but the bona fide musician is a different creature, 
and one is tempted to take him seriously if he will allow it. 
Scognamillo is not a charlatan, but he is a very ordinary 
player, with no distinction of quality, tone or technique. If 
he possessed these qualities his playing of Schubert's Sere- 
nade, a quite judicious selection, would take well, and some 
of Popper's intricate eccentricities would, I am sure, delight 
an Orpheum gallery for the sheer dexterity they require. 
Perhaps I am taking the matter too seriously, although I 
have tried not to. 

* * * 

Let me see; this is a review of a vaudeville performance, 
and Etta Butler is on the programme. Well, that is quite 
important, particularly when it is remembered that she is 
engaged for one week only and that is to be her last in 
vaudeville. Her imitations are interesting, and of interesting 
reople, and they are as good, I take it, as imitations can be. 
In voice and manner she is the person she imitates. That 
is all she can possibly do. and she does it extremely well. 
She has everything but the appearance and the personality 
of her models. Her versatility is extraordinary, and if she 
is not as insinuating as Anna Held, nor so intense as Mrs. 
Fiske, nor so strenuous as Mrs. Carter, it would be absurd 
to find fault with her; for these qualities are the expression 
cf three striking personalities, which can only be sug- 
gested and not duplicated. It is because the personality 
of an artist cannot be reproduced that all imitations, be they 
graphic, literary or dramatic, are inferior to the original. 
Miss Butler imitates to entertain, and her best is the best 
that can be found. She bas capable rivals, but none is so 
varied nor so uniformly clever. Mr. Charles Leonard 
Fletcher, a masculine imitator, is also on the bill, and some 
of his work is better than good. He makes up on the stage, 
using all the paraphernalia of the dressing room and indulges 
in a running accompaniment of monologue. Irving, Ezra Ken- 
dall and Mansfield are successively portrayed with admirable 
faithfulness. The Damm Brothers are recruits in the ath- 
letic department, and the rest of the bill is made up of hold- 
overs. Irving Jones talks more than he did last week and 
sings as much, though his new stuff is not so funny as the 
old. Gilbert & Goldie never fail, as everybody knows by this 
time. 



Mr. Frawley's predisposition to melodrama has invited 
an attack of the disease that we are compelled to diagnose 
as chronic. "The White Heather," his latest importation, is 
a real stylish affair with lords and ladies disporting them- 
selves to delight the gods of the gallery, and an aristocratic 
villain plotting the undoing of a virtuous heroine, in which 
he is foilea by a hero noble by nature but not by birth. 
The blood-sponge is conspicuous by its absence and the only 
thunder comes in the form of uproarious applause from the 
upper tiers. The star of the performance is an automobile. 
It acted very well, indeed, and got three or four curtain calls. 
The sensational novelty, about which the twelve scenes of 
"The White Heather" are buiided, is a hand-to-hand encoun- 
ter at t je bottom of the sea. The contestants are swathed 
in divers' suits and their fight is very tame. The authors 
must have overestimated the value of this newest adjunct 
of the arama. It is really not worth while to write a 
play for the sake of introducing it. Why is it that these la- 
boriously realistic situations are almost always thrill-less 
and disappointing? I suppose they are not meant for intelli- 
gent people, and they really must reach the other kind. 
And then, too, intelligent actors lend themselves to such 
t lap-trap. Mrs. Carter's flying trapeze performance in "The 
Heart of Maryland"; Blanche Bates' wild ride a la Mazeppa, 
and Mr. E. j. Morgan in a submarine scrap. I don't understand 
it at all. With Mr. Harrington Reynolds it is different — he has 
chosen villainy and melodrama for his vocation, and must 
needs do strange things indeed; but it must be said that he 
is admirably suited to do the kind of work and does it at 
times conspicuously well. We hear occasionally of an actor 
refusing to take a part, and I am ready to believe that it 
happens sometimes when we do not hear of it. It would 
not have surprised me if I had heard that Mr. Morgan declined 
to play Dick Beach. What surprises me is that he did not 
do so. Stock company experience may be to the actor like 
finger exercises to the pianist and "academics" to the art- 
ist — practice; and the stock company experience has made 
some good actors, particularly abroad, but in this case, 
Mr. Morgan, it isn't worth the price. The part assumed by 
Mr. Theodore Roberts is a different matter. I can imagine 
him finding it worth while and doing his best. He certainly 
makes the rugged old Scotchman interesting, which in itself 
is a palliation. 

PORTER GARNETT. 



Owing to the phenomenal success of Florence Roberts as 
Lady Teazle in the Alcazar's presentation of Sheridan's 
' School for Scandal," it was found necessary to postpone the 
promised production of "The Country Girl," the Wycherley 
comedy, to next week. The cast will include Florence Rob- 
erts as Peggy, the country girl. Agnes Ranken as Alithea, 
Marie howe as Lucy, Mr. White Whittlesey as Dick Bel- 
ville, Mr. George Webster as Squire Moody, Mr. Edwin Em- 
cry as Ned Harcourt, Mr. Lucius Henderson as Sparkish. 
aiu Mr. Frank Bacon as Old Will. "Camille" is announced 
to follow. 

* * * 

Next week is the last of the comic opera season at the Tiv- 
cli, and the management has decided to again put on the 
great success of the year, "The Toy Maker." This opera 
went seven weeks to packed houses, and nothing better 
could possibly be selected to wind up the comic production 
at this house. The same cast will be in evidence that made 
tie piece such a go. On Monday. July 29th. the season of 
grand opera will begin, "Aida" and "Rigoletto" to be the 
bill for the first week. 

* * * 

Mr. Hugh Stanton and Florence Modena, in Mr. Stanton's 
cne-act comedy, "For Reform," will be among the new-com- 
ers at the Orpheum next week. Amita, a spectacular dancer, 
will make her first appearance here. Mr. Will H. Murphy 
and Blanche Nichols present a farce. The Brooklyns are ec- 
centric musicians and comedians. Mr. Ed. F. Reynolds is 
a ventriloquist. The hold-overs are Chevalier bcognamillo. 
Mr. Charles Fletcher, Damm Brothers, and the biograph. 

* * * 

Mr. Chauncey Olcott. the ballad singer, comes to the Co- 
lumbia Theatre July 22d, when he will present for the first 
time in this city his new Irish comedy, "Garrett O'Magh." 
Mr. Olcott will be heard in five songs of his own composi- 
tion. 



July JO. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



AMONG THE BUNDERS. 

By Robert McTavith. 



What She Wat Looking For. 
A pretty girl, evidently from the country, stood at till 

Mr of Kearny ami Market streets Monday, looking around in 
a bewlidered way. It was not long before several cigar-store 
loafers discovered her and began discussing her personal 
appearance and speculating as to whether she would kindly 
receive such attentions as any of them might offer. At last 
n narrow-shouldered youth with a pea-green suit of clothes. 
■- purple tie. a red shirt, a yellow vest, a barber's bang, and 
the complete low-comedy get-up of the professional "mash- 
onfronted the young woman with an air of thorough 
i ock-sureness. 

"Excuse me. Dolly." he drawled, shifting his cigarette, 
"can I be of any service to you? You seem to be looking for 
some one." 

"Yes." she responded. "I was just waiting for my husband. 
Oh. there he comes now." And she indicated a tall, two- 
hundred pound German, with a Schuetzenbund uniform, and 
fierce, fan-shaped mustaches, who was just rounding Lotta's 
fountain. "Oh, don't go, sir!" rippled the inexperienced 
young thing as the gentleman with the green suit flitted 
away. 

"She was looking for some one." grimly chuckled the cop 
at the corner as Mr. and Mrs. Schuetzenbunder departed, 
arm in arm. "She was looking for trouble." 

* * * 

The Wrong Initials. 

When Schmutzer and Schopenhauer started up from the 
ferry after landing in San Francisco they were full of — 
enthusiasm. They were mightily pleased at the decorations 
on Market street, and proud to be of the great body of 
Schuetzenbunders for whom — they thought — these strings 
of banners had been stretched across the city's great high- 
way. 

"It vos vorth some viles to be a Schuetzenbunder, doesn't 
it, ven der beobles"put out all der flags mit our honor," said 
Schopenhauer. 

"Yaw," responded Schmutzer, "I feel goot alretty yet. 
But — vy — Schopenhauer, dese beobles know not how to spell 
nicht. Dere been across dem flags 'E. L.,' ven for us to honor 
it must be 'S. B.' " 

They had a long discussion over it, and at last appealed 
to a policeman. 

"How been it vas," said Schmutzer, "dot all dem flags have 
on them yet 'E. L?' Dot vos not der vay for Schuetzen 
Bund." 

"Faith, ain't that just loike the Dootch?" said the man in 
blue. "Thim flags, Hans, is fer the Ipworth Lague. 'E. L.' 
shtands fer Ipworth Lague. If you want to see flags with 
'S. B.' on thim look in front of the Rathskillars. To some 
1l also stands for 'Some Beer.' It's sorry I am that I'm on 
dooty." 

"Haw, haw! Dot been some jokes, und der beer vos on 
you, Schopenhauer." 

"Der beer vill be in me, too, Schmutzer. Dot vos some 
jokes, too. Ven I get stuck I always makes some jokes to 
make even myself." And they disappeared into a cool, shady 
place that had — the right initials on the yellow flag. 

* * * 

Criticism Awakens Loyalty. 

"Oxcu^es me for not apologizing some," said Snyder as 
he stepped up to a young tough on Market street Sunday 
morning, "but could you information me to how de process- 
ions march already? I vos yet a Schuetzenbunder." 

"Gee! I'd like to have yer load! Where'd you get it? 
It's a peach." 

"If I got some loads young man it been paid for, so. You 
smoke some nasty cigarettes like your mout' haben and ven 
you vas my age you von't be able to carry yourself mit some 
loads or mltout some loads. I vos yet a Schuetzenbunder." 

Just then the procession, looking like the grand opera 
season at the Tivoli, came down Market street. Bacchan- 
alian maidens danced, the stag on the wagon held himself 
■with dignity, and the dozen or more bands made merry 
music. Aides galloped up and down the line, and the specta- 
tors on the sidewalk grew enthusiastic — all except Snyder. 



w.ii. whj don ■ n i.i 11,.' t.uiKh This I* 

your p 
'I to* a SchaeUenbunder but Uni nbnnd is In 

disgraces mit me. I llk<> it tit. lit s.. I 1 n n fi-mnh- ini 

personation, ami 1 like to dan.. somi mit uis at 

de head. hoIdlnK mit my two hand! V.n I 

could not man h liki' do) I march nut nt all already >• 
day. I vns a behind nnmber 

"Pretty bum procession, ain't Itf" Bald the tough, to whom 
i cubing but i Democratic parade, with torch-lights k-ainr.'. 
was beautiful. 

Ynts dot? a bum processions you call it — all don 

Schuetaenbunders mit dem uniforms und medals und dem 
runs ami bands" You make me ashamed mil my backsliding. 
I hern a disjointed Srhuetzciiluimli'r. Now I been a true 
Schuetcenbunder." Ami Snyder, with all his loyalty awnk- 
ened, joined the tall end of the procession, just passing. 
and marched proudly — albeit a little unsteadily — to the ferry 
— a "behind number." 



Dora your dealer keep 
.Tesso Moore Whiskey ' 
If not, insist o> his 
(lottlne It tor you. 
The finest in the world. 



St. Louis A. B. C. Bohemian, the king of all bottled 

beers, brewed from the finest Canadian Barley and imported 
Bohemian Hops. 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing 

fivrup" for your children while teething. 



Columbia Theatre. 



Horn. on. Mabi Sl Co., 

Lessee" and Managers. 
Monday, July 22nd. For Two Voeks Only. Every evening, in- 
cluding Sunday. Matinee Saturday only. The Representative 
Irish Comedian, 

MR. GHAUNGEY OLGOTT 

"The Sweetest Sinter on the Stage." In the New Comedy. 

GARRETT O'MAGH 

Wiitten by Augustus Pi tou, Mannger. The piny wilt be pre- 
sented here with the treat cast, all of the magnificent scenery 
and Grand effects that characterized Mr. Olcott's lone and suc- 
cessful engagement of five months in New York. Hear Olcott's 
new songs- 

1 San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. 

r P Re U ITl . O'Farrell St,, between Stockton and Powell streets. 

Brightest and Best in Vaudeville ! Hugh Stanton & Florence 
Modena. Amita, Will H. Murphy & Blanche Nicholls, the Three 
Broohlyns, Ed. F. Reynard. Chevali<-r Enrico Mario Scogna- 

millo, Da mm BroB, Charles Leonard Fletcher and the American 

Biograph- 

Reserved Seats 25o.: balcony 10c.; opera chairs and box seats, 50, 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday- 



Tivol 



Mbp. Ernestine Keeling, 

Proprietor and Manager. 



i Opera House. 

Last Nights of the Mid-Summer Extravaganza, 

BABES IN THE WOOD 

Monday, July 22. Great Revival I 

THE TOY MAKER 

Last of the crinio operas this season. One week only. 

GRAND OPERA SEASON— July 29. Seats on sale Monday, 

July 22. 

Evenings at S. Matinee Saturday at 2. 

Popular prices— 25 and 50 cents. Telephone Bush 9. 



r\ i /T" I I Belasco & Thau. Managers. 

Alcazar I heatre. phone Main 254 

Commencing Monday, July 22th. 

FLORENCE ROBERTS 

Supported by White Whittlesey and Alcazar Stock Company 
will present Augustin Daly's version of Wyoherley's Famous 
Comedy in Three Acts, 

THE COUNTRY GIRL 

Seats six days in advance. Only Matinee— Saturday- 



After the Theatre 



Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the finest 

wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zlnkand is society's gathering place after the theatre 

over. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1901. 




LibmryGabk 




In "Richard Carvel" Winston Churchill 
The Crisis. wrote the first of a series of novels, which, 

while in no sense sequels or interrelated in 
any way, were destined to form a distinct historical sequence, 
portraying phases of American life at different periods. 
The colonial society in Maryland, and the fashionable life 
of London prior to and during the early days of the American 
Revolution, formed the background of the book, which be- 
came so enormously popular, and which has now, after an in- 
terim of two years, given such an impetus to the sales of his 
new novel, "The Crisis." In this latest contribution to Ameri- 
can historical fiction the scene is laid in St. Louis, nearly 
half a century later. Virginia Carvel, a great granddaughter 
of Richard Carvel, is the connecting link between the two 
stories. Stephen Brice, the fictional hero, is a young Boston 
attorney, who comes to St. Louis to enter the law office of an 
old friend of his father. His New England ancestry and po- 
litical proclivities make it difficult for him to adjust himself 
to new conditions. Of course he loves Virginia, and she in 
turn hates him because he is a "Yankee." A cousin, a typi- 
cal young Southerner, is for a time the favored suitor, but 
ultimately Stephen Brice's Northern strength of purpose and 
nobility of character conquer her self-will and overcome her 
prejudices, and to the steadfastness of his affection she 
surrenders unconditionally. The main interest of Mr. Chur- 
chill's work, however, does not center in its affairs <lc cocur, 
but in its historical worth. Abraham Lincoln is the great 
dominant note of the whole hook. It's well-deserved success 
lies in the fact that it is a masterful presentment of the 
martyred President — strong, lovable, ungainly, magnificent 
and oft-times misunderstood, serious and tender, an alto- 
gether unique character in the history of any country. Mr. 
Churchill shows us the man as he was more clearly than 
many of the voluminous biographies of Lincoln which have 
seen the light during the last forty years. No such in- 
spiring picture of the great Westerner is to be found in any 
political or personal history of the times. With rare artis- 
tic perception Mr. Churchill has seized the impressions 
which Lincoln made upon his contemporaries, and has so 
reproduced them that the man himself in all his human 
attributes stands before the reader. Those chapters devoted 
to the momentous days of the great debate in 1858 — when 
the crisis is reached — when Douglas, the "Little Giant," the 
political prestidigitator, is brought face to face with Lin- 
coln, the merciless logician, are amongst the strongest in 
the book. Stephen Brice has been sent to meet Lincoln at 
Freeport, that he may feel the influence of the rail-splitter's 
ideas. Here he gains his first impressions of Lincoln as a 
speaker: "Stooping forward, Abraham Lincoln began to 
speak, and Stephen Brice hung his head and shuddered. 
Could this shrill falsetto be the same voice to which he had 
listened only that morning. Could this awkward, yellow man 
with his hands behind his back be he whom he had wor- 
shiped? Ripples of derisive laughter rose here and there, 
on the stand and from the crowd. Thrice distilled was the 
agony of those moments! But what was this feeling which 
gradually crept over him? Surprise? Cautiously he raised 
his eyes. The hands were coming around to the front. 
Suddenly one of them was thrown sharply back, with a de- 
termined gesture, the head was raised, — and — and his 
shame was forgotten. In its stead wonder was come. 
But soon he lost even that, for his mind was gone on a jour- 
ney. And when again he came to himself and looked upon 
Abraham Lincoln, this was a man transformed. The voice 
was no lDnger shrill. Nay, it was now a powerful instrument 
which played strangely upon those who heard. Now it rose, 
and again it fell into tones so low as to start a stir which 
spread and spread, like a ripple in a pond, until it broke on 
the very edge of the vast audience." On the morning follow- 
ing the debate, when Stephen Brice is about to take leave 
of Lincoln to return to St. Louis, the latter said: 



"Come, Steve, be honest. Didn't you feel sorry for me last 
night?" Stephen flushed scarlet. 

"I never shall again, sir," he said. 

The wonderful smile, so ready to come and go, flickered 
and went out. In its stead on the strange face was ineffable 
sadness, — the sadness of the world's tragedies. Of Stephen 
stoned, of Christ crucified. 

"Pray God that you may feel sorry for me again," he said. 

Grant and Sherman are also well presented, as they were 
before the war, the former a dealer in Are wood unloading 
his cart at the back door of a St. Louis residence, the latter 
the president of a street car line. When later on there is 
some talk of Grant's commanding a regiment, some one says: 

"I spotted him by the El Sol cigar. He used to bring a 
load of wood to the city once in a while and then he'd go 
over to the Planter's House or somewhere else and smoke 
one of these long fellows and sit against the wall as silent 
as a wooden Indian. After that he went into real estate 
one winter. But he didn't make it go. Curious, it is just a 
year ago this month that he went over to Illinois. He's an 
honest fellow and hard working enough, but he doesn't 
know how. He's just a dead failure." 

But in the novel he lives to make a record for himself, 
to become General Grant, later on Commander-in-chief of 
the army of the United States. Every true American will 
be proud of Mr. Churchill's fine American spirit, which 
animates every line he writes and will echo with a fervent 
"amen" the belief which he voices with so much evident sin- 
cerity, "That God has reserved for this nation a destiny 
high upon the earth!" 

Mr. Churchill is a graduate of the Naval Academy at An- 
napolis, and is but thirty years of age. He comes of good 
English and American stock and was horn and raised in 
St. Louis. After graduating, he waived the bright prospects 
of a naval career to devote his time to letters, and accepted 
a position on the Army and Navy Journal. After spending 
a year on editorial work on this journal and the Cosmo- 
politan Magazine, he turned his attention to story writing. 
His first book, "The Celebrity,'" which appeared in 1897, was 
voted a literary hit. Mr. Churchill then turned his thoughts 
to higher things and decided to write a series of stories 
covering the different phases of American life. How well 
he has succeeded the immense popularity and unprecedented 
sales of "Richard Carvel," and "The Crisis" attest. If Mr. 
Churchill has not yet written the "great American novel," 
he has come very near doing so, and his next contribution to 
American historical fiction will be impatiently awaited. 

The Macmillan Company, Publishers, New York. Price 
$1.50. M. E. B. 

In "Blue Shirt and Khaki," Mr. James 
Blue Sh.ic and F. J. Archibald purports to draw a com- 
Khaki. parison between the soldiers of the 

United States and those of Great Brit- 
ain, from observations during the short campaign before 
Santiago, and the Boer-British war in South Africa, at both 
of which he was present as a correspondent of a weekly, 
paper. He gives a description of the British enlisted man, 
in which he praises his courage and discipline, when properly 
officered and led, but comments strongly upon his want of 
intelligence, and incapacity to act for himself in cases where 
he is deprived of proper leadership. This, Mr. Archibald 
claims, is in strong contrast to the American soldier, who is 
always ready and able to rely upon his own judgment when 
circumstances require. 

The book is written in a taking reportorial style, is well 
illustrated with many interesting photographs taken by the 
author, and in some of its chapters, such as those on trans- 
portation and the commissary departments, gives much 
valuable information concerning the most exciting events 
of the close of the last century. 

"Blue Shirt and Khaki," by James F. J. Archibald. Silver, 
Burdett & Co., New York. Price $1.50 . 



BOOKS REVIEWED IN THIS PAPER 
Can be Obtained at 



Robertson's 



126 Post Street 



July 20, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 







10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1901. 



MER.E GOSSIP 

Betsy Bird. 

The newspapers have been saying that Mrs. George 
Morse scorns the Four Hundred and tosses her head at the 
thought of being one of them. I have a still better story. 
No less a person than Mr. George Morse himself recently 
stated that Mrs. Morse does not pretend to be above society. 
She simply is society. The gentleman declares his wife 
looks pityingly upon the antics of the little worms crawling 
over San Francisco's hills, which imagine they are the elect. 
The husband says his wife has been "it" for thirty years. 
She was simply born "it." As for the Scotts, long before they 
ever dreamed of wearing social swaddling clothes, or knew 
whether society dwelt on Nob Hill or North Beach, she was 
society. How can she desire to obtain. what is hers by birth- 
right? The Scotts, says Mr. Morse, make Mrs. Morse tired. 
However, Mrs. Eleanor Martin is on the visiting list of his 
wife, and so Mrs. Henry Scott need not feel hopelessly 
doomed, for at least her daughter is married to the son of 
a lady whom Mrs. Morse considers worthy of her acquain- 
tance. 

Mrs. Morse has more things to say about the Scotts. 
She asserts that Mrs. Henry Scott is a matchmaking mamma 
and that when Miss Barber, Mrs. McKinley's charming 
brown-eyed niece, who won everyone's heart, was here, she 
tried to bring off a match between Miss Barber and her son 
Prescott, who is at either Yale or Harvard. Mr. Prescott 
Scott is a fine big fellow, but it seems he did not strike 
Miss Barber's fancy, or perhaps she merely preferred to 
stand with her connection by marriage, Mrs. morse. At any 
rate, when Mrs. Scott arranged one of her processions, at 
Monterey, I believe, Miss Barber flatly refused to ride in the 
carriage with him. On several other occasions she showed 
her displeasure at Mrs. Scott's strategy in always bringing 
them together. 

I have it upon the authority of the Morse family that 
when the Presidential family left here, Mr. Prescott Scott 
went as far as Ogden with them. He informed Miss Barber 
that he is coming to Washington to call upon her, and if she 
is not there he is to give himself the pleasure of journey- 
ing to oanton to pay her a visit. Now, what do you think 
Miss Barber wrote to Mrs. Morse? "He will not come to call 
en me if 1 see him first." Who could imagine that such 
big, round, soft brown eyes could belong to a young lady of 
such decided ideas? We never can reckon upon what a 
woman win or will not do. Now I will venture that if Mr. 
Prescott Scott goes to call upon Miss Barber she will receive 
him like a tender cooing dove. I have seen a few girls in 
my time, and I know how their words and acts are at war. 

After hearing both sides of the case I am inclined to think 
that Mrs. Scott overreached herself a trifle when the Mc- 
Kinleys were here. If she wanted to win the friendship of 
the President and his wife for her social career, she should 
not have got the Morses by the ears. The great diplomats, 
you know, not only count the king's secretary, but his valet. 
And while Mrs. Morse might no, have influence enough to 
send Henry to St. James, I imagine she, like nearly any other 
woman, could have considerable strength in "knocking." 

The other local McKinleys do not love the Scotts either, 
for that family assumed greater importance than even the 
President's during the stay of the visiting great. One of 
Mrs. Scott's offenses, I understand, was to go into the Presi- 
c.ent's kitchen and give orders to the servants. I hope this 
is the last time I shall be obliged to record the incidents 
of these social differences. 

Is it not nice to hear of the amiability of friends? It seems 
that when Mr. Tom Bishop and his bride were going on their 
wedding trip Mr. and Mrs. "Alex" Baldwin occupied the 
drawing room. The newly married man said to his friend, 
"Alec, I wish I had your drawing room." "You may have 
it," quickly replied Baldwin, "it is yours." So Mr. and Mrs. 
Bishop started out into the world in a drawing room. 

Another wedding trip story is apropos of Mr. and Mrs. 
Latham McMullin, nee Thomas. It is so difficult for Mrs. 
McMullin's friends to call her anything but Mollie Thomas. 
When they came home from their wedding trip, instead of 
ordering a carriage and making a big fuss about it, Latham 
merely went to his office and his wife got on a car and went 



straight out to their house which was awaiting them. 

It is said that Mrs. Eleanor Martin intends making an 
assault upon Newport after Peter's marriage. My advice 
is "Don't," for while San Francisco society, not a generation 
old, puts up with eccentric speech and manner, New York 
does not, for the reason that it is not compelled to do so. 
Dear Mrs. Martin should understand that. Only the wealth, 
birth, breeding, charm, tact, beauty and grace combined 
effected for Mrs. Potter Palmer what Mrs. Martin would at- 
tempt. Soon after the announcement of the Oelrichs-Martin 
engagement, the Jays, cousin, aunt and uncle of Miss Oel- 
richs, declared that they were going to Europe, not to return 
until after the wedding. It remains to be seen if they alter 
their plans. None of the Oelrichs approve of the marriage 
for several reasons. One is that Peter has been threatened 
with suspension and expulsion from at least one club in 
San Francisco on the charge of conduct unbecoming a gen- 
tleman. Another is that the Martins are decidedly nouveau 
ricnes, and according to the code of the Charles Oelrichs, 
'purely nobodies." Even all this might be forgotten if Peter 
had sufficient wealth, but he has not. Even the red blood of 
the Martins and Downies might seem blue if Mr. Peter Mar- 
tin had as much money as Tessie Fair Oelrichs. Meanwhile 
Mrs. Martin is sending the handsomest things to Miss Oel- 
riches, and surely if kind attentions can procure a warm 
welcome. Mrs. Martin should have it from her daughter-in- 
law. Peter's wife is to be the favorite daughter of the house 
of Martin. 

At the Union Club in New York there is an unwritten law 
that no woman's name be spoken. A man who breaks the 
rule is looked upon as a cad, a "bounder," or anything you 
choose. Not long since, one member of it was aroused to the 
highest pitch of indignation by the jilting of young Mr. 
Hughes of Denver, by Miss Baxter, who married Mr. Hugh 
Tevis. This man called no names, but he spoke of Mrs. 
Tevis as "that Denver woman," and to an applauding audi- 
ence gave his views upon the subject of a girl who jilts a 
comparatively poor man for a millionaire. Still he violated 
no rules. Nearly every man I know is indignant at Mrs. 
Tevis. She seems to be made to suffer for all the others of 
her sex, much older than she, who have done as badly or 
worse. For my part, I can only say she was an eighteen year 
old girl, and who expects any stability in a child of that age? 
Mrs. Lloyd Tevis says her daughter-in-law is the most beau- 
tiful girl she ever saw in her life. Mr. Hugh Tevis was al- 
ways mad for fair women. He had violent passions, and 
one of his loves was Sybil Sanderson, who is fair. His sec- 
ond wife was his ideal. Little Alice Tevis has made up her 
mind that she wants to live with her beautiful step-mother, 
but although she is her guardian, Mrs. Hugh Tevis w».. 
probably leave the little girl with Mrs. Boalt. 

Mr. Hugh Tevis was very sure of his life else he would 
hardly have made an eighteen year old girl guardian of his 
child. It is a great responsibility to be given the young 
widow, the charge of half a million of her own, and that 
of an equal amount for her step-child. 

Rumor starts from such small causes that one never knows 
just what to believe, but one report that I meet in society 
is that there is to be a posthumous heir to the Hugh Tevis 
estate, and that is why young Mrs. Tevis is to remain here 
for several months under the care of her mother-in-law. It 
is not generally known that Governor Baxter is a West Point 
man, served several years in the army, and resigned when 
he married the wealthy Miss McGhee of Kentucky, whose 
father owned large cattle ranches in Wyoming. 

At one time it was thought that Colonel and Mrs. Maus 
would be compelled to go out to Manila. One of the Parrott 
girls, now at Monterey, made a comment upon the subject 
which I think should go into history. "Isn't it horrid 
of the Government to order Colonel Maus to Manila? Just 
think, Mrs. Maus has a sister in Washington, Miss Poor, 
who is coming out this winter, and she ought to be there to 
chaperon her. It is so nice to have a married sister for a 
chaperon." Miss Parrott now thinks better of the Govern- 
ment. 



St. Louis A. B. C. Bohemian, the king of all bottled 

beers, brewed from the finest Canadian Barley and Imported 
Bohemian Hops. 



J-iy 20, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 




"What's in a name?" the poets nsk. 

A question of this nature 
Oft causes us to take to task 

Our common nomenclatur". 
There's Lady Hope, for Instance, she 

So fond of raising Hades — 
Now how could any morals be 

More hopeless than my Lady's? 

There's also Major P. B. Strong, 

That soldier dissipated, 
Who for a weakness seasoned long. 

Has grown quite celebrated. 
N\ hen names like these are dragged to view, 

We must confess we find them 
Misleading as indices to 

The characters behind them. 

Now that the police are plying their more or less thank- 
less task of hounding the morphine fiends out of Chinatown, 
does it ever occur to you to ask where these outcasts get 
the "dope" which is making of their minds and bodies an 
obscenity in the daylight? Did you ever stop to think that 
some honest merchant, by a cheerful daily barter in poison, 
is catering profitably to these phantoms whom the police 
disturb at public expense? Near the corner of Clay and Mont- 
gomery streets there is a drug store, the Montgomery-Street 
Pharmacy by name. The proprietor of the establishment is 
Mr. William Simpson; the clientele is largely made up of 
cnloral, cocaine and morphine fiends. It is a fact too well 
known for remark that narcotic poisons are sold without re- 
straint by druggists far and wide, but the Montgomery- 
Street Pharmacy does not stop at the mere sale of the goods. 
There at a reasonable price you can get a "shot" served up 
as neatly and as unquestioningly as a cocktail at a bar. 
For the sum of ten cents a clerk will take you behind the 
screen, bare your arm, and administer the poison with a 
SKill born of long practice. Mr. Simpson furnishes every- 
thing. Due to years of enterprise, the proprietor of the 
Montgomery-Street Pharmacy has worked up a patronage 
which includes practically the whole white section of China- 
town. If the police really mean business in their present 
crusade against opiates, they might turn their eyes in the di- 
lection of the corner of Clay and Montgomery streets. To 
close Mr. Simpson's store and send Mr. Simpson to San 
Quentin would be far cheaper and vastly more effectual than 
to punish a thousand of his victims. 

As the bull-dog is sure to show his teeth, soon or late, so 
is the strike inclined to turn its ugly side to the daylight. 
Last Tuesday night, Mr. F. A. Pagendarn and Mr. Fred M. 
Cliff, employees of the Dundon Iron Works, were in self-de- 
tense compelled to fire into a drunken mob of strikers, who 
were trying to make converts in the good old French Revolu- 
tionary way. The strikers may orate and explain, setting 
forth their position as peaceable seekers after their rights, 
but it is a matter of record that strikes mean bloodshed; 
for it takes human sacrifice to appease the fiercely inexor- 
able fetich of the unions. The French, the Roman, the 
American mob mind are much the same, which reminds me 
that the jackass is as immortal as human nature. 

The Crier has always believed that wives should be 
beaten — that is, to a moderate extent. A man certainly has 
a right to administer punishment to the partner of his joys 
and sorrows with his fists, or with a length of gas-pipe, or 
some other light piece of furniture that does not hurt very 
much. But I cannot help feeling that J. B. House, of Oak- 
land, has gone too far. His wife asserts that he has been 
in the habit of using Indian clubs in correcting her. I really 
think that he is too harsh. It may be that she is larger than 
he, and he had to resort to violent measures. Still, he should 
consider the fact that she is a woman, and is entitled to con- 
sideration at his hands. 



Since the strenuous Imt Iniix. 

r California 

d among man who daal In 
lure to say horrid thin K s. "Won made 

an sling |i Minv 

illsl > ' Anrnad pirns.-, and if the dirty pubHc 

don't iik.' it. they will find those words In the new Century 
Dictionary the BtbI thing they know." it la doubtless this 

sort of philosophy that has prompted the m.ist 
bratlon at the Me, -hanks' Library to jab woi other 

which evi-n the new Century Dictionary, which tells -. 
pronounce octopus with an accent on the second syllable, 
is not enough up-to-date to sanction. President Irving and 
Librarian Teggart. in the present library row. have settled 
Trustee Henley's hash by declaring (so the papers say) "the 
most charitable thing one can say about Bealey is that he is 
nutty." I haven't the public spirit to be very much exercised 
over the Mechanics' Library debate, but I think that the 
word "nutty." as here used, Is almost as good as Professor 
Wendell's "slops." Thus may we thank our universities and 
libraries for enriching our already opulent language. 

I wonder if the papers do it on purpose or if it is due to the 
plain cussedness of things in general? In 1897 when the 
grand trans-continental convention of the Christian Endeav- 
orers were holding high jinks in this city and State, what 
should pop up but the epoch-making scandal created by the 
elopement of Mrs. John Bradbury and her English paramour. 
California hasn't such another scandal since, until this week 
of Epworth League piety, when the hopeless Lady Hope and 
the weak Mr. Strong had the bad taste to show up in town, 
getting their pictures and the pictures of their paste jewelry 
in the papers. As a consequence the week journalistic 
has been about equally divided between writing up the Ep- 
worth League and telling how the team, Hope & Strong, have 
been disgracefully ejected from every hotel in the city, from 
the Palace to Marehand's. It's humorous, but it shows the 
city to the visitors from the East in a light that is not of 
the moon or stars or of the sun by day. 

The marvelous inconsistency of human nature has never 
been more clearly demonstrated than by San Francisco's 
treatment of the social evil. Instead of recognizing its ex- 
istence and taking proper measures for its regulation, we 
have adopted a policy of hunting the unfortunate women 
from pillar to post, a policy which the Crier considers to 
be both infantile and cruel. It is universally admitted that 
you cannot legislate immorality out of existence; all you can 
do is to keep it within decent bounds. We have cleared 
all the disreputable houses out of Dupont street, in the vicin- 
ity of St. Mary's Church, and forced them to locate in 
Commercial street, a staid business center. But at the same 
time we have left the notorious Bacon Place in full swing, 
right opposite the doors of a sacred edifice. The Nymphia, 
which was specially built on an out of the way corner at 
Pacific and Stockton streets, has long been closed, but to 
everyone's surprise, a new establishment, of exactly similar 
character, has been allowed to open at the corner of Broad- 
way and Dupont streets. The Crier once uttered a parable 
of the Boil and the Bogus Plaster, the moral of which might 
apply in this case. 

O, rum is a demon that hides 

Destruction within its insides. 

Steam beer is better, 

Also much wetter, 

And more for your money besides. 

The Alameda County Board of Supervisors are a body of 
very fine distinctions, that's evident. With a Parkhurstian 
vigor they are closing up the dirty Dutch beer gardens along 
the Fruitvale road, and even making so thorough a job of 
it as to refuse a license to the Hermitage, a well-ordered 
road house, which had a good name all over the State be- 
fore the Alameda Supervisors were in swaddling clothes. 
Yet for some remarkable reason — no one can tell why — 
they have allowed one unkempt beer garden to continue be- 
side the Fruitvale road. Why they should close the Her- 
mitage and let the above beer garden — or Barnum's restau- 
rant in Oakland, for that matter — continue to do business, 
caiy the Alameda Supervisors can explain. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1901. 




The week has been notable for the presence of two large 
bodies of visitors — the marksmen of the National Bund, 
which is having its third annual festival at Shell Mound this 
year, and the Epworth League, who, "thirty thousand 
strong," have come to hold their annual convention on the 
far Pacific Coast. The streets are crowded to an extent not 
often seen here, and once again we have had day and night 
processions, decorations, illuminations, etc. Californian hos- 
pitality is proverbial, and it goes without saying that with, 
such an influx of guests from afar, entertaining has been 
the rule this week; and this, with showing the sights to 
friends, has kept the entertainers' time very fully occupied. 

Society is still disporting itself in the country, and is more 
scattered than usual. All the resorts seem to be well patron- 
ized, and few of them more favored than others. But as a 
consequence of their absence in such numbers social life 
in the city is rather tame. To be sure, the earlier absentees 
are already beginning to return, and in another month the 
majority will be turning their steps homewards in crowds. 
Still there are a good many who have country homes of their 
own to which they cling till the last possible moment, and 
August is the great month of the twelve at Del Monte; so 
fashion pure and simple we may not hope to see for a long 
while yet. The Blingumites are enjoying life in their own 
way — the men with golf, polo, and horse races, the women 
with luncheons, card parties and the like. Mrs. Frank was 
first in the field with her game of six-handed euchre, at 
which eighteen ladies contested for the hardly-won prizes. 
Next in the card line came the parties at Mrs. Wilson's, 
Mrs. Crocker's and Mrs. Scott's; Mrs. Whittell, Mrs. Pope 
and Mrs. Crockett have given dinners, and several ladies 
have been luncheon hostesses. There will soon be a large 
exodus from thereabouts for Del Monte, where great will be 
the assemblage of the swim during the August festivities; 
the Jack Parrotts have already gone and will remain sev- 
eral weeks. 

It is quite the correct thing for guests at the summer re- 
sorts to make brief visits from one to twenty-four hours to 
others near at hand, as, for instance, those exchanged be- 
tween Highland Springs and the Blue Lakes. Mrs. Salis- 
bury matronized a party from Howell Mountain to Etna 
Springs last week; another party of country visitors was 
chaperoned by Mr. and Mrs. Henry Crocker, who took a 
coach load of their friends staying at their Cloverdale ranch 
to visit the different resorts in Sonoma County. 

San Rafael continues to he a stronghold for golf, and numer- 
ous are the games and tournaments on the links of the San 
Rafael Club. The tournament played for the Benedict cup 
by married couples only will be one of the events of next 
week, taking place on Saturday, the twenty-seventh. There 
was another of the weekly enchre parties at the Hotel Ra- 
tael last Thursday, rivaling if possible in enjoyment the one 
which inaugurated the series. 

The yachting fraternity has again been in evidence this 
week. A dance at the San Francisco Yacht Club house in 
Sausalito on Saturday evening was the opening event, fol- 
lowed by entertainments given by the Corinthians at Tibu- 
ron, yacht races, etc. 

The most interesting item of the week is the sending out 
of cards for the wedding of Miss Bessie Gage and Mr. W. 
H. Richardson, which will be a home ceremonial at the Gage 
residence on Harrison street, Oakland, on the evening of 
Tuesday, August 6th. It is also made known that it is to be 
a pink, white and green wedding. The six attendant maids, 
the Misses Ethel and Mabel Gage, Belle Nicholson, Crissie 
Taft, Ruth Dunham, and Amy Scoville, are to be costumed 
alike in green crepe de chine, and carry sprays of pink roses; 
the gown of the maid of honor, Miss Rose Nalle, is to be of 
white crepe de chine over pink, and her bouquet of maiden 



hair ferns. The bride, of course, will be robed in white, 
and the Rev. Robert Ritchie is to tie the nuptial knot in 
the bay window of the library, where the decorations are 
to be in pink, white and green. The marriage of Miss Mabel 
Gage will take place in September. 

Miss Ethel Dickson's friends have been sending her their 
congratulations, the news of her engagement to Mr. William 
Hennen of New York having reached them last week. Miss 
Ethel was a great favorite during her residence in San 
t rancisco, and when the family departed to make their 
home in Gotham it was with genuine regret that their adieus 
were received. 

An engagement announcement of the week of more than 
passing interest in Jewish circles is that of Miss Beatrice 
Sachs to Mr. Julius Ach, which has just been made by the 
parents of the handsome bride-elect. The wedding, which 
will probably be an event of the near future, will be one of 
those elaborate affairs for which that denomination is so re- 
nowned. 

Monday next, the 22d, will be the wedding day of Mr. Tom 
Van Ness, when in far away Cape Town, South Africa, he 
will wed Miss Hilda Kennedy of that place. The news, which 
reached here this week, is of interest to his old friends in 
San Francisco, where not so very long ago he filled the role 
of society beau. He and his bride will make their home in 
South Africa, for the present, at least. 

Mrs. Charlie Keeney is entertaining a young New Yorker, 
and that, coupled with the rumor that Miss Ethel meditates 
returning to the big city before long, is causing knowing 
smiles, head-shakings, and "I told you so's," to be exchanged 
among her friends here. 

Dr. Henry Gibbons and his daughters, who are at Deer 
Park Inn, are expected home next week; Miss Ida Gibbons, 
who is at Etna Springs, will remain there until August. Mrs. 
Eldridge, nee Newlands, is visiting her mother, Mrs. James 
Newlands, at her home on Clay street. 

San Francisco society is quite elated over the whisper 
which has come from over the sea that Mrs. John Mackay, 
having emerged from her seclusion of several years past and 
re-entered the gay world in London may possibly accompany 
her husband on his next trip to this coast, when she will 
make a stay long enough to allow of her many friends here 
to see something of her socially. 

Dr. Hopkins is off on a vacation trip to Europe. Mrs. 
Hopkins accompanied him this time, and they will make a 
tour of the continent ere they re-cross the Atlantic homeward 
bound. 

Mrs. J. D. Spreckels and Miss Lillie have been enjoying the 
beauties of Lake Tahoe before going to Coronado, where 
Miss Grace has been since early in the season; Mrs. John 
Boggs and Miss Alice are at the Vendome, where they are 
booked to make a stay of some duration; Miss Carrie Taylor 
is at Burlingame with her sister, Mrs. George Pope; Miss 
Caro Crockett has Deen visiting her future mother-in-law, 
Mrs. Irving Scott, at the Hotel Vendome. Mr. and Mrs. 
Charlie Baldwin paid San Francisco a visit of several days 
this week; Mrs. Ethel Bent expects to sail for Manila on 
the 15th of August, where she will join her husband. 
Captain Charles Lyman Bent; Mr. Henry Payot has again 
become a wanderer; he has gone to join Mrs. Payot in Buf- 
falo, and after doing the Exposition, New York will be vis- 
ited, and then — well, he had not quite decided about that 
when he left. 

Quartermaster General Luddington, accompanied by Mrs. 
Luddington, sailed on the transport Grant for Manila last 
Tuesday, where he will remain several weeks with Generals 
Lorbin, Sternberg, and Weston, who preceded him on the 
Hancock two weeks ago, and who reached their destination 
on Tuesday last. 

Dr. and Mrs. Guy L. Edie will spend the next few weeks 
at Byron Springs, where they go for the benefit of the Doc- 
tor's rheumatism. They will not go to their Eastern sta- 
tion, Columbus, Ohio, until the late autumn. 

Professor Hermann Genss has accepted a call to the direc- 
torship of the Irving Institute Conservatory of Music, and 
will assume charge at the beginning of the new season, 
August 5th. His specialties are piano-forte, vocal music, 
theory and harmony. 



July 20. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Twenty little girls from the Little Mothers' Training 
School for Domestics. 943 Harrison street. I.ft In i I, 
«. matron this week for San Ramon V;ill.y. DMt I'.mvllle. 
Contra Costa County, where 
they will remain for several 
weeks. This outing Is not 
among the least considerable 
of the., many kindnesses 
planned out for the children 
of the Home. It Is not exag- 
gerating to say that many of 
these girls, born as they are 
to toll ond poverty, hove 
never before in their lives had 
an opportunity to taste the 
pleasures of a summer outing. 
The little matrons will be 
the guests of Mr. Newman 
Boone, who has kindly placed 
at the disposal of the school 
his old homestead and birth- 
place. It is unnecessary to 
say that the outing among the 
green fields and hills will be 
a memorable one for the chil- 
dren. 

Although the Little Moth- 
ers' Home has been in exist- 
ence but a little over a year, 
its success has become a sure- 
ty, as it deserves to be. The 
idea of the home is as noble 
as it is practical. 

"Little Mothers" are the 
older sisters in poor families, 
who have to care for their 

younger brothers and sisters while their mothers are out 
at work. In this school these little girls between the ages 
of ten and fourteen are taught all branches of housework, 
and after a two-years' course will be competent to go into 
private families as trained domestics. 

Although the twenty children now in the country do not 
comprise nearly all the membership of the home, others will 
oe treated later to the little plunge into fairyland. The 
managers of the Home wish to extend their thanks to the 
Southern Pacific Company, Wells Fargo & Co., and others 
to whom they are indebted for the present trip. 



Watermelons, cantaloopaa, nil kinds of fruit and 

at oni.-y & lioetiing's. stalls California 

Market. Their goods :>; 




A School for Home-Makers. 

Bathing is exceptionally good at Del Monte this year, 
and the beach is crowded every day with those who like 
to battle with the waves. 



A Skin of Beauty is a Joy Forever. 



D 



Between golf and paper chases the patrons of the Hotel 
Rafael find plenty of amusement these days. There are a 
large number of Eastern visitors at present there. 

The following are guests at the Hotel Rafael: Miss Maud 
Wentworth, Mrs. W. H. Brinner, Miss Helen Brinner, Mr. 
F. A. Grenwood, Mrs. A Cook, Mr. Truxton Beale, Miss E. 
Gallaoe, Miss Gallaoe, Mrs. Geo. E. B. Blakelee, Miss Grace 
Blakelee, Mr. E. B. Beam, Mr. B. E. Shear, Mr. C. W. Sarbe. 
Mr. W. H. Lewers, Mrs. M. Jacks, Miss Jacks, Mr. C. E. At- 
wood, Mrs. W. B. Hopkins, Mr. Henry Mitar. 

The sixth annual meeting of the Pacific Polo and Pony 
Racing Association, to be held at Del Monte from August 
19th to 24th inclusive, promises to be the best meet ever 
held there. Golf will have a prominent place in the pro- 
gramme for the week, and four days will be devoted to that 
sport. On the 21st the ladies will play the qualifying rounds 
for the Women's Amateur Championship, the match rounds 
to be played during the last three days. Polo and racing 
will bring out some good horses and some stubborn contests. 

Mrs. Avery McCar^y is at Monterey completely overcome 
with grief at the loss of her son Richard, who died not 
long ago. She is living very quietly, and has gone there for 
rest. Mrs. Bothin is another young mother who just lost her 
only son, I believe Mr. Whittier's sole grandson. Mrs. Bothin 
has previously lost four children. 



R. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 



Removes Tan, Pimples, Freokles, 
Moth Patches, Bash and Skin Dis- 
eases, and every blemish on beauty, 
and defies detection. It has stood the 
test of 53 years and Is so harmless we 
taste it to be sure it is properly made. 
Accept no counterfeit of similar name. 
Dr. L. A.Sayre said to t a lady of the 
haut-ton(a patient): "As you ladies 
will use them, I recommend 'Gour- 
aud's Cream' as the least harmful of 
all the skin preparations." For sale 
by all druggists and Fanoy-goods 
Dealers in the United States, Canadas 
and Europe. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 
37 Great Jones street, N. Y. 

TELEPHONE GRANT 4 




MRS. M. E. PERLEY 

KERAMIC STUDIO 

Instructions In CHINA PAINTING 



Colors and enamels for sale. 
China fired dally. 



Keramlc Roman Gold. $1.00 per box. 
Agent for Revelation Kiln. 



209 A POST ST., S. F- 



St. Louis A. B. C. Bohemian, the king of all bottled 

beers, brewed from the finest Canadian Barley and imported 
Bohemian Hops. 



One beauty about Jesse Moore Whi-key is you can always depend on Us 
purity. 



D L .. For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, Millard 

I) I I J S il Cv S tables, brewers, book binders, oandy-makers, canners, 
*-~* 1 K ** J * ■^-'^ dyers, flour mills, foundries, laundries, paper-hang- 
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roofers, tanners, tallers, etc. 

BUCHANAN BROS. 

Brush Manufacturers, 609 Sacramento street, San Francisco. Tel. 6610 

Worthington Ames 

rtember Stock and Bond Exchange 

Broker In Stocks, Bonds, and Municipal Securities 

Safe Deposit Building. 324 Montgomery street. Telephone Main 1381 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1901. 



KISSES 



Looker AM 



m>m 




It is refreshing to note that the wife of a prominent 
Colonel, stationed at the Presidio some years ago, has 
come off her high horse recently and has condescended to 
recognize the fact that Miss Blanche Bates is within hailing 
distance of the polar heights of Society with a big S. It is 
also worthy of mention that Miss Bates has taken occasion 
to publicly snub the proud Colonel's lady, and to snub her 
"good" and plenty," too. There is of course a story behind 
this fattening of an ancient grudge. It goes back to the 
days when Miss Bates herself was an army wife at the Pre- 
sidio, and was caged like a wild bird within the narrow walls 
of army society. After she married into army circles it 
did not take very long for Miss Bates to find Presidio society 
too narrow and conventional. Nor did she take kindly to the 
somewhat effortless life of the army women, and her ardent 
soul revolted at the idea of paying the deferential to the 
stupid and pompous dowager who figures in the present 
story. Mrs. Colonel was as jealous of her dignity as if it 
really existed, and the army women, considering her the 
mentor of all things elegant, made it fashionable to love 
Miss Bates as little as she loved them. In fact, their dis- 
agreeable but unsuccessful efforts to "keep her in her place" 
had a great deal to do with driving her back to the freedom 
of stage life. The question of precedence of rank before 
brains was too much for her. Previous to the marriage, her 
husband had promised to let her return to the stage, and his 
subsequent refusal practically caused their separation. As 
naturally as a bird flies she followed the art which her 
mother had imparted to her, and to which the gift of heaven 
and her own inclinations called her. 



"Little did the poor mother of May Yohe know, as she bent 

over her needlework through the long day " that is the 

v ay one oi the papers treated it. Another opened up with : 
"Sunken in vice, etc." and the minor papers chimed in with 
sweet accord. It was a great story. It isn't every day that 
eyen a yellow journal can catch a real titled lady in such an 
— ah — mesalliance. The way they went after the story was a 
sight not to be forgotten. The editor of one paper headed his 
editorial staff and they marched into the Palace Hotel to the 
beat of bass drums. The regular hotel reporter had sent in 
word that a lady with a great diamond swallow nad been 
seen drinking champagne at a table in the hotel court, and 
the staff arrived in three minutes. A minute later the Chroni- 
cle staff came down, and then for three days Captain Putnam 
Bradlee Strong and Lady May Hope were traced from the 
Palace Hotel over to the California, and from the California 
to Marchand's. It wouldn't have taken so long only one 
editor was not up in his court news, English coats-of- 
arms and other trifles, and so was not able to decide just 
what a diamond swallow did stand for. He had much to 
contend with, and was additionally hampered by one of his 
men, who had been reading Marie Correlli, and was insist- 
ent upon the fact that a diamond swallow had something to 
do with the monastery of Lars. Every time the staff would 
take an off tack this poor benighted individual would lug out 
his Correlli and point to the place. And so the startling 
news was delayed three days. It was not until an English 
tourist, chancing to get into a reportorial melee, drolly re- 
marked: "The swallow oh, that is worn by the lady whom 

King Edward gave to Hope, ye know." It was all over in a 
moment. 

But the ducal diamonds and the space they were allotted — 
that is the amusing part. I wonder if it is generally known 
that the jewels belonging to England's noble houses are not 
allowed to be carried wherever a noble lady may be pleased 
to take them, that there is a law to prevent this? The 
diamonds Lady Hope wore were of good American paste. In 
this country it is horriDly coarse to wear paste diamonds, but 
it is not so across the water. Indeed, it is customary for the 
LObility to have an imitation of the family jewels, so that 



when a Lady goes through Lunnon town she does not carry 
one hundred thousand dollars of sparkling things about her 
neck and run the risk of immortality for the sake of them. 

We cannot say with Captain Strong, "we are jolly glad it 
was no worse." It was bad enough. Even the canine part 
of the party has had to suffer for the careless morals of the 
master. There are three good dogs in San Francisco that 
have been driven from the public pillar to the biblical post, 
and are now chained in some vacant lot and howling like 
the biblical pin. In the Capt. Strong retinue were one Boston 
terrier, the property of the Captain, and two sky-terriers be- 
longing to the lady. (They were the only things in the party 
that were not mated.) They dined at the Palace for a time, 
and later were sent out to the Canine Hotel on Haight street, 
i-very day the Boston terrier was taken for a walk by the 
Captain's man, and the sky-terriers went out with the lady's 
maid. Then the crash came. One morning the manager of 
t_e Canine House picked up his paper and read of the scan- 
dal. He rushed to the telephone and called up the Captain 
at the California Hotel. "Your dogs are staying at my hotel, 
Captain," he called, "and I have ordered them out within half 
an hour." 

"Great Scott, man!" roared the Captain. "It is a singular 
coincidence, but I have been ordered out of my hotel, too." 

"I want no jokes, sir," retorted the manager. "If your 
aogs are not out of my hotel in half an hour, my rates will 
be fifty dollars an hour from that time." 

The great sun had just finished his morning splash in the 
Pacific Baths and was rubbing himself down with a towel 
of China fog when Captain Putnam Bradlee Strong, U. S. A., 
Lady May Hope, E. N. G., William Waddell Watson, S. E. C, 
seventeen trunks, two colored servants, three dogs and a 
man, stepped out onto the pavement near the California 
Hotel, and stretched up their hands to the sad sky; then, 
with bended heads, sad steps and slow, turned and climbed 
wearily up the hill. 



"It is considerably bosh," said an Owl, "that rumor that 
tney are all so industriously passing that Mrs. Hugh Tevis 
was received with disfavor by the mother of the groom. 
There was no great opposition made to the match by Mrs. 
Lloyd Tevis at the time the engagement was announced, 
and I cannot see where the rumorists got their authority 
for the story that the lady was getting the cold shoulder 
all around. Mrs. Tevis, Jr., is personally a sweet woman, 
and is utterly devoted to the memory of her husband. Do 
you know that the young Mrs. Tevis is now staying, at the 
very cordial invitation of Mrs. Lloyd Tevis, at the Tevis 
residence on Jackson street? Mrs. Lloyd Tevis has asked 
her to stay a year. That does not look much like family 
disapproval, does it?" 

* * * 

I hear that the members of the Columbia Rowing Club are 
thinking of asking Hon. Samuel M. Shortridge to join their 
numbers since the persuasive barrister made his now world- 
famous record against time and tide at Sausalito last 
Saturday. Mr. Shortridge's atnletic stunt was done like many 
another great deed on the spur of the moment, and little 
did he think last Saturday morning as he left his quiet Sausa- 
lito cottage for a still quieter spin down the bay that he was 
entering a new field for a new wreath of honor. 

Mrs. Shortridge accompanied her husband to the wharf, 
where a right and tight little rowboat was swinging at her 
moorings. Mr. Shortridge descended to the craft, got his sea- 
legs with all the sang froid of a Sir Thomas Lipton, hoisted 
the union jack and manned the oar-locks. 

"Now, my dear," called he to his faithful spouse, "watch 
me break the Sausalito record ior a mile and a half." 

So speaking he set forth with a mighty tug at the oars, 
copying the Leander Henley Regatta stroke, 32 to the min- 
ute. After a few moments of this health-giving exercise he 
looked up to see what progress he had made, and was sur- 
prised to find that the piles and scantlings of Sausalito 
wharf still loomed overhead. The tide was racing in quite 
heavily, so Mr. Shortridge. deeming this to be the cause of 
his slowness, redouoled his efforts and pulled against the 
bouncing billows until the sweat of honest toil was running 
down his cheeks and over his shirt-front. 

Again he looked up, again he was amazed to note that the 



July 20. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



IS 



pier wsg Just whore ha hud left it More than this. 

email boys. Italian fishermen, wharf I 

era ami Rtnuner girls were watching his moras 

him with an expression as If fo say. 
him do H 

At the sight his hr< pneumatic with Short 

pride He removed his coat He braced his (eel ■ 
at the oars fit to send the frail i raft Into the middle of the 
hay. Then he took a rest. 

And at that moment he saw his wife leaning over thi 
of the wharf, and heard her saying in a still, small 

"Samuel, dear, wouldn't you go a little faster if you un- 
hitched your boat from the wharf?" 
• • • 

Every one in town knows Judge Ward McAllister, for he 
is one of the few New Yorkers who prefer the coast to the 
East, and he has lived here many years. He never forgets, 
however, his monocle. English accent, or the fact that he 
is a Heywood and a gentleman. In Judge McAllister's 
opinion, to be a Heywood is the only thing worth while. If 
you were not born a Heywood you may try to imitate them. 
It is also a nice thing to be a McAllister, but the McAllister 
blood is variegated, and not always the pure unalloyed blue, 
while the Heywood blood for centuries has never been 
streaked or had spots in it. 

It was the Heywood in Judge McAllister which received 
a rude shock within a fortnight. He heard that the Bar 
Association was circulating a petition to erect a monument 
for the late Hall McAllister. The Judge was rather inter- 
ested. Of course it "was not like erecting a monument to 
a Heywood, but the McAllisters are not to be despised, and 
he was pleased with this tribute of the unwashed lawyers 
of the West to gentle blood. The Judge thought he would 
make the acquaintance of the gentleman circulating the 
petition. So he went to Mr. Delmas, and dropping his eye 
glass said: 

"Tell me the name of the lawyer chap who has assumed 
the responsibility of erecting the monument to my uncle." 

"With pleasure, Judge," answered Mr. Delmas, "the gentle- 
man's name is Colonel Kowalsky." 

Judge McAllister regarded Mr. Delmas incredulously 
through his eye glass and said, half under his breath, "Very 
pleasant. Very nice." Then the Judge shook his head, 
took his stick, and walked away. 

* * * 

I once had a talk with the Czar. 
Said he, as he lit a cigar, 

" 'Twould be a sad joke 

If this weed which I smoke 
Were fixed to explode with a jar." 

* * * 

It has been a favorite theory among the detectives and in 
the newspaper offices that the $30,000 stolen from the Mint 
was spent in the tenderloin, and indeed it is scarcely yet 
abandoned by those sagacious owls who are always ready 
to explain you anything from a Supreme Court decision to 
the procession of the equinoxes. But a moment's reflection 
shows that the theory is obviously untenable. No man could 
spend $30,000 in three months on the San Francisco tender- 
loin without leaving a track as wide as Market street and as 
wet as the bay of San Francisco. The late Jesse Potter, who 
was about the most lavish producer the quarter has known 
in years, once spent $900 in one week at a well-known re- 
sort, but it pretty nearly killed him. The human capacity for 
tenderloin champagne is limited, even if you take a bath 
in it, which is perhaps the safest way. 

It is this absence of reasonable explanation concerning 
the use of the money that makes the case so mysterious. 
The thief must be one of three or four men. What did he 
do with the money? It is not an easy thing to cover up 
$30,000 when every move you make is watched. It is reason- 
ably well-established that the money was not handled by 
any of the banks. If the money is hidden somewhere the 
thief is afraid to go near his pile because he knows he is 
shadowed night and day. He knows that it cannot be 
safely hidden anywhere about his house, because that may 

Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 
cures poison oak and all skin diseases. Sold by all druggists. 



Utocether, if 

Hi.' thief still has the mom 

him mu. h the mlnuti 

than usual th.' ■:■ | qoW the n 

m tu.iy i ., rob the Mint 

but to gat any good of Hi.- iii.ni. . J. To have 

in your snap and <" knoe th 
penitentiary to gel them and >• t are unable to enjoy the 
Hi.' reSnemenl of torture. 

« • • 

l-'or a eulogy of th.' late Dr. Jo think noth- 

ing could In- Utter than the quoting of the lesson of . are this 
i real man taught so often to th.- pupils he had gathered 
.•bout him. II.' was wont to call himself a fossil, and to be- 
rate tin- theoretic learning Which ran rampant over the li.'ird- 
fought facts of the laboratory magnifying glass. The fossil- 
talk" was a standing joke, for no one accepted proof more 
teadily. He used it for the lesson he wished to teach. And 
the lesson I quote verbatim — I know it so well. 

"Yes, I am one of your fossils." he would say In his high 
voice. "I have been here so long that tin- very house has 
grown to be part of me, and my mental furniture is nailed 
to the floor. It used to be that we could do this — that we 
could accept a theory and live with it a life-time; but now 
with our ever-active science and our changing thought we 
must have our furniture so that it can be moved about a 
little. If we have it nailed we must tear it up. sometimes 
floor and all, to re-arrange it for the reception of our new visi 
tors. But one thing I would warn you about. There are some 
; eople not satisfied with having their furniture moved about; 
they must put it on casters so that it can be shifted with 
every passing fad. And so they go on rolling it about the 
room from one corner to the other, and never knowing where 
it is. My young friends, have your mental furniture mov- 
able, that you may suit it to the day's demand, but do not 
put it on wheels, lest you have nothing to rely upon in your 
loom of life." 



Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. 

Cooper & Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 



Beware of unscrupulous dealers who relill Jesae Moore bottles with In- 
ferior eoodB. 



Valuable 

Papers 

Lost 



Can rarely be replaced. 
Why, then, run the 
risk of losing yours, 
when you can rent a 
Safe Deposit Box for 
their safe-keeping at $5 
a year from the 



CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT 
AND TRUST COMPANY, 

COR. CALIFORNIA & MONTGOMERY STS., 
San Francisco, California. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Virginia and Gold Hill Water Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the Virginia and Gold Hill Water Com- 
pany will be held at the office of the company, room SI, Nevada Block, 309 
Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal,, on 

THURSDAY. THE 25th DAY of JULY, 1901, 

at the hour of II o'clock a. m., for tho purpose of electing a Board o* 
Directors to serve for the ensuing year and the transaction of such other 
business aa may come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on 
July 23. 1901. at the hour of 3 o'clock p. m. D. C. BATES, Seoretary. 

San Francisco, July 13. 1901, 

ANNUAL MEETING. 
The Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works. 
The atinual meeting of the stockholders of the Kisdon Iron and Loco- 
motive Works, for Ihe election of Trustees for the ensuing year and the 
transaction of such other business as may be brought before the meeting, 
will be hf Id at the office of the company, southeast corner of iJeale and 
Howard streets. San Francisco, on 

MONDAY, THE 5th DAY OF AUGUST, 1901. 
at 11 o'clock a- m. L. R. MEAD, Secretary. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1901. 




The property of the Montezuma Min- 
The Montezuma ing Company may be all it is cracked 
Mining Company. up to be. but if so its value will not 
be enhanced by the manipulation now 
going on in the interest of the owners. There is something 
uncanny about the literature scattered broadcast all over 
the country by a concern in this city styling itself the Ameri- 
can Guaranty and Trust Company. This literature is too 
sloppy and charlatanic in its character to promote much con- 
fidence in the genuineness of the proposition. No less than 
eieven pamphlets enclosed in one envelope are found neces- 
sary to sing the praise of mines and the men who are drag- 
ging the continent in search of people willing to buy their 
wares, and thereby blossom into millionaires. "Got in on 
L„e ground floor" is tue cry, and an essay is furnished on 
tne "Ground Floor Ideas" of the Montezuma Mining Com- 
pany's plan, a la American Guaranty and Trust Company, 
but which does not contain a line in reference to lofty tumb- 
ling. These millionaire-making propositions have turned 
out badly of late in San Francisco. One of the charitable 
individuals engaged in turning out these eighteen-carat 
gems had his office furniture attached last week, and the two 
others, who made a specialty of literary advice on the sub- 
ject of money-making on the ground floor idea are now 
numbered among the missing as absquatulators. It will be 
r.oticed in literature of the kind, every keynote is struck 
likely to arouse the innate cupidity of mankind, and every- 
thing is made easy for the investor so as to reach the indi- 
vidual of small means. Few rich people will waste the 
time to wade through page after page of printed matter fur- 
bished up by a company promoter. 

In the case of the Montezuma, state- 
Ten Million Shares ments are made which do not accord 
for Sale. with the begging tone of the circulars 

issued by agents who seem to believe 
it necessary to educate the people on the value and impor- 
tance of copper mining, one of the best known and widely 
discussed subjects of the day. Quite a number of promi- 
nent men of position in the North Pacific States are named 
in connection with the property, which, if as described, 
ought to and would command a ready sale in the open mar- 
ket, without resorting to the stock jobbing methods adopted 
to float 10,000,000 shares on the installment plan. It is to 
he regretted that space will not permit the publication in 
full of a specimen circular issued by the American Guaranty 
and Trust Company, illustrating the up-to-date style of pro- 
moters' art. It goes on to say that the end of every working 
day adds to the value of the great copper and coal mines 
of the company, and that the prices of shares advancing 
from month to month, by no means keep pace with the de- 
velopment. "Some of our clients appreciate this fact, and 
make every effort to secure as much of the stock as possi- 
ble during this ground-floor period. The element of risk 
in Montezuma shares is practically eliminated. If the buy- 
ing of them ever was a speculation it is no longer so." The 
mining man who recognizes the fact by hard practical exper- 
ience that all mining is speculation more or less, will doubt- 
less appreciate the sanguine tone of the heart-to-heart talk 
of A. G. & T. Co. to its clients and correspondents. * * * 
Again: "The widening of the 'Tacoma' copper ledge to 20 
feet of Highly Mineralized Stone is. it must be remembered, 
the object lesson of but a single one of 24 copper mines of 
the Montezuma Company. All the indications point to the 
Montezuma having the biggest copper show in the country." 
Quite a good recommendation, indeed, with a foreign twang 
to it. "Highly Mineralized Stone!" 

After expatiating on the expenditure 
A Sliding Scale of several thousand dollars a month and 
of Payments. a steady income assured from install- 
ments until the coming autumn, when 
the production of coal and coke will insure dividends, and 
"the stock will be advanced to true values," $10,000,000, the 



installment plan is presented, and the millions in autumn 
can be reached on a sliding scale of monthly payments. 
"This means a chance," says the spider to the fly, "to buy 
at 14 cents shares that will next month be worth 17 cents, 
and in sixty days 20 cents or 25 cents. It is equivalent to 
an option on as many shares as you wish at the price named. 
Sixty-day options at 20 cents are being placed in the East. 
There is no risk in buying Montezuma shares, since you can 
realize in cash the price paid. We have standing orders from 
clients for shares in any amount at less than current 
prices. This opportunity for safe and profitable investment 
on easy terms may never come again. You will oblige us 
by writing us your opinion of Montezuma whether you buy 
or not." Imagine asking a stranger for an opinion on a 
mine located hundreds and perhaps thousands of miles 
away, but this is in keeping with other peculiar ideas of 
the compilers of this strange but alluring document. 

The type of smelter manufactured 
An Effective and by the Vulcan Smelting and Refining 
Simple Smelter. Company of San Francisco, is meet- 
ing with much success, and daily 
gaining favor with all mining men who have come in contact 
with it. It is a modern furnace, simple in construction, 
inexpensive to maintain, and will treat smelting ores at a 
cost greatly below the cost of treating the same ores in the 
old style blast stack. The mechanical construction of the 
furnace is simplicity itself. There are no tuyers, or boilers, 
or engines, or belting or shafting, that are necessary for the 
operation of the old-style furnace, consequently a saving 
in installation, a saving in maintenance, and a reduction of 
the amount of fuel necessary for proper fusion, of from 50 
per cent to 75 per cent, over any furnace now in use. The 
Vulcan Company is now installing a thirty-ton plant on the 
Bullion mine in Plumas County, California, for Mr. Thomas 
E. Haydon, of Reno, Nevada, which will be in blast about 
August 15th. They are also building a fifty-ton furnace for 
the Pacific Union Mining and Smelting Company, of Lords- 
burg, New Mexico, which is to oe followed by other furnaces 
of five hundred tons capacity in the very near future. These 
two plants are being watched with a great deal of interest 
by mining men of all sections of the country, and we are 
pleased to note that the Vulcan Smelting and Refining Com- 
pany, which is controlled by San Francisco people, are meet- 
ing with wonderful success In the treatment of ores, with 
their new type of smelter. 

The market for Comstock shares 
The Comstock Mining has shown more life during the 
Market. week, especially at the north-end, 

and business has been somewhat 
better. Some important work is now being carried on at 
the south-end in the joint Challenge, Confidence, Imperial 
west drift, and hopes are expressed that the results may 
serve to build up prices again in that section of the lode. 
The latest news from Con.-Cal.-Virginia is most assuring, and 
the bear tips to the contrary, are anything but safe to bet 
on. Another test of ores from this mine is to be made at 
the Kinkead mill to make certain of the result. A proposi- 
tion is now suggested to put in a milling plant of 500 or 1000 
ton daily capacity for the use of mines in which large re- 
serves of low-grade ore are known to exist. It is said that 
with the cheap power now available the cost of reduction 
would be somewhere about 10 cents per ton. The mill re- 
cently erected at the mouth of the Sutro tunnel is crushing, 
it is said, six tons to the stamp of material from the tunnel 
waste dump with entire satisfactory results. The mill is 
equipped with ten stamps and four concentrators. 

A fairly active market is reported 
The Local Investment for the week with prices varia- 
Market. ble and weaker at the close. 

Sugar stocks have borne the 
brunt of a bear attack, in face of excellent reports from the 
Isiands. The announcement is now made of the erection of 
an immense refinery at the islands, which will handle the en- 
tire product of the plantations. Eastern capitalists, headed 
by Mr. Edward Pollitz, the originator of the enterprise, are 
back of this enterprise, which has a most important bearing 
upon the future of the industry. The long-foretold combi- 
nation of powder companies, based upon the re-incorporation 
of the California Powder Company, is still in the shadowy 
future. There is nothing in the story founded upon an as- 



July 20. 1901. 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



17 



sumption of all' which, when sifted dowi 

nothing back of them. Po*»ll' 
would like to make a combination of the kind upoi 
looting with a lug company like the California, and r< 
of the kind may be useful In bulling the market on 

It Is just as well, however, to rem in. I the 
trading public that there Is absolutely no foundation for the 

leport that any combination la contemplated. < ". is ,v Electric 
made a stride upwards for a short period, but tagged under 

ire of sales. Bonds of nil kinds, representing n 
ter class of investments, were in demand, and prices In all 
cases were well sustained. 



INLISTKD SECURITIES. 

Oil Stocks- 

UfD PRICES AS THEY ARE 



loOO shares Bachelors 



1000 

too 

1000 
500 

4000 
1000 

HBO 

900 

190 
1000 
8000 

tono 

900 

90 
1000 
1000 
1000 

M0 
1000 
901 i0 

1000 
2000 
1000 
250 
100 
2900 
500 
1000 
500 
500 



For sale hy JOSEPH B. TOPI. 1 1 / 
•) 01 



California Fortune {9 

California Mutual 15 

California I rude 

Clairemont 30 

Contra Costa 02 

Del Bey . 30 

Eclipse ■■ 12Vi 

Electric IS 

Famosa Oil A; Inv... 17!J 

Grand Paci Mo 20 

Imperial Cons 05 

Rem River OH Consolidated 05 

Kern Valley .0 15 

Lake & Colusa 3 00 

Lincoln 07% 

Lion 111 

Ml Hamilton Land A; Oil Co 10 

Mendota a... 20 

Monarch ... 21 

Napa and Beiryeasa - 07K 

Occidental 50 

Panochito 05 

Prudential 17% 

Sant* Maria 05 

Sovereiim 38 

Tran-fer 01 

Three States 01 

Vernon .... . 20 

Vesuvius U I5 

Wellineton 05 

Above prices will show conclusively what Immense sarlnir you can make 

in buying; shares from 

Joseph B. Toplitz, Stock Broker, 

Member Producers' Oil Exchange. Rooms 9 and 10. 330 Pine street. 



Sold by 
the 

(0 "5 

50 

1 00 
25 
75 
25 
7'. 
35 
25 

50 

1 00 
15 
25 
25 

10 00 
50 
75 

15 

1 00 
75 
20 

2 50 
25 
35 
25 
75 
25 
10 
75 
E5 
25 



Tie B mgehaa.!' 

On the Oil to r- trem ! 
Exchange. will be retired ' 

I of the bll 'lading still 

on nt the Producers' and the rnanlpul saga In 

.1 way to protect Heir stork fiom n, who 

cleaned up handsome raloes from raiding weak com- 
This has been the corse or th ind helped 

to bring it down to its present unprofitable basis, it is • 

to break ■ ltOCk at any time than to raise it. and tin- . urli 
dealers recognising this have sold the market short on • 
little showing of strength and made th"ir point. The strong- 

• -i stork in the list is Caribou, which is gradually working 
into a position where its management Will not only have 
oil to sell in any quantity required, but will have their 
own pipe line to carry it to the railroad. With this showing 
it is no wonder that the stock not only holds firm, but has 
shown an advancing tendency In face of the universal dau- 
nt ss which prevails in and out of the board room. 

THE STOCK MARKETS. 

Transactions on the Producers' Oil Exchange from July 
11th to July 17th: 



Shares 

Stocks. Sold. 

Caribou 900 

Home 2 850 

Junction 2,130 

Kern Oil 180 

Kern River 135 

Lion.. 3 200 

Monarch of Arizona 2 050 

Occidental of West Virginia . . . 200 

Oil City Petroleum 1,300 

Peerless 370 

Petroleum Center 18,483 

Reed Crude Oil 335 

San Joaquin 0. &. D. Co 175 

Sterling 2,250 



Range of 
Prices. 
80 to 

to 

to 

lo 

to 

10 

to 
to 
to 
to 
to 

to 



Twenty-Eight. 
California Standard. 

Four Oil 

Hanford 

Independence 



Evbby original package of Jesse Moore Whiskey is guaranteed abso- 
lutely pure by Jesse Moore Hunt Co. 



475 

933 

1,500 

6 

500 



Total $38,932 



2 10 

8 

6 25 

8 50 

9 

18 

45 

25 

4 90 

3 

35 

7 37}*to 

I 25 to 

1 15 

25 

35 

98 00 

12 



2 16 

11 

5 50 

9 00 

12 

28 

48 



to 

to 

to 

to 100 00 

to 13 



6 25 
5 
36 
8 00 
1 35 
1 25 

36 



Gross 

Sales. 

720 

6,002 
209 
952 

1,197 
339 
609 
123 
325 

1.857 
824 
120 

1.389 

2,917 
574 
233 
530 
598 
64 

19.578 



An Extranet 

From the CATALOGUE of the 

BEST 

Manufacturing 

Company, 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 



Running Expenses — The "Daniel Best" Crude Oil Engine. 
A comparative test made at our works with one of our five 
horse-power engines, running ten hours each on city gas, 
gasoline, kerosene, crude petroleum, and distillate : 

Coal Gas, ten hours run, 1000 feet $2.00 

"Daniel Best" engine on gasoline 1.94l/ 2 

"Daniel Best" engine using kerosene oil 

110 fire test 1.49^ 

"Daniel Best" engine using distillate 97 

"Daniel Best" engine on crude oil (Coalinga) 74</z 
"Daniel Best" engine only uses Coalinga, Fresno County, 
California, crude oil right from the well. 

The above test is only another argument in favor of the 
jsuperiority of the oil from this district over that of oils 
from other districts, showing that it is the only oil in the 
State that can be used direct from the well for the purpose 
of generating gas in steam engines, lubricating the same, 
and for valve and cylinder oils, and it is absolutely impossi- 
ble to obtain a barrel of this oil either wholesale or retail 
at less than 75 cents a barrel at Coalinga. 

The stockholders of the Mt. HAMILTON LAND & OIL 
COMPANY and all prospective buyers can readily see the 
wisdom of the management of this company by having se- 
lected all their lands in the Coalinga District, such as is used 
exclusively by the "Daniel Best" Crude Oil Engine Co. 

MOUNT HAMILTON LAND & OIL COMPANY, 
Rooms 30-31-32-33 Rea Building,. 

San Jose, California. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1901. 




Insurance 



^^fSS^^ s 




There is one manager in town capable of writing a serial 
on "when a man's wife is out of town." He saw her leave 
for the East the other day, and when handing her into the 
car he absent-mindedly gave the porter his new sixty-dollar 
overcoat at the same time he handed him his wife's hand 
bag. After waving adieus and getting on the boat for San 
Francisco he missed the new overcoat. He returned to the 
mole on the first ferry and scanned every one that had any 
garment that looked like his, and sadly confided to the 
friends he met that he would have to get a duplicate before 
his wife came back. Next morning in his office, while be- 
wailing his loss to a fellow manager, he got a telegram 
from his wife, saying: "All's well. Porter will bring your 
overcoat to the office Friday morning," and being a good fel- 
low he took the other manager out on the condition that he 
would not tell, and did unwire certain divers and sundry 
bottles. But don't say overcoat to him when you meet him. 

* * * 

Grain losses are going to ruin more than one "contingent." 
A manager recently wrote to his company an elaborate ex- 
planation that county roads, railroads and the sub-division 
of large tracts had made it in his judgment impossible for 
any one loss on the lines he was writing to exceed a one- 
quarter section. He got an 1800 acre loss the next day, 
and no reinsurance. 

* * * 

The tables published by the Pacific Underwriter, which 
are the first figures out, showing San Francisco's premiums 
to June 30th of this year in comparison with the same for 
1S9S, 1899 and 1900, is causing comment. While the totals 
thow a small increase over those of last year some of the 
companies individually have suffered severely. 

* * * 

The muddle of the Endowment Rank, which is the insur- 
ance annex of the Knights of Pythias, is not settled. Mr. 
J. A. Hinsey has resigned and issued a public statement 
in which, after abusing others and defending himself, he 
says: "I resigned because the Endowment Rank could not 
pay the salary which I could afford to accept. These are the 
exact circumstances under which I resigned, and no other. 
1 am not indebted to the Endowment Rank to the extent of 
one cent, and have not used any of its funds for my personal 
benefit, either directly or indirectly." This seems all right, 
but those who forced Hinsey's resignation are talking about 
u half million shortage. The true condition of affairs 
will not be known until after the examination of the Endow- 
ment Rank is completed by the State Insurance Department 
of Illinois. 

* * * 

When any one receives an appointment to a position in the 
Lnited States Mint, the Treasury Department exacts a bond 
and dictates the amount. Superintendent Leach was re- 
quired to give a bond in the sum of $100,000, which was fur- 
nished by the Fidelity and Deposit Company of Maryland 
(which company made good the Widber defalcation.) Mr. 
Dimmlck has furnished a bond for $5,000. Bonds furnished 
by surety companies simply guarantee that the person bond- 
ed will faithfully discharge the duties with which he is en- 
trusted, and no more. Superintendent Leach cannot bond 
his subordinates in the Mint, for the reason that they are 
all bonded direct to the United States. Hence the talk in the 
daily press about Superintendent Leach's bond being good 
for the deficit is all bosh. 

* * * 

Colonel H. K. Field, he of the New England Mutual Life 
Insurance Company, was presented recently with a very 
fine water color painting. It is handsomely framed and bears 
the inscription: "Presented to H. K. Field, Who Made Me 
Insure My Life." This seems as if it might be reaping where 
you have not sown. 

* * * 

Mr. Walter J. Wilson, General Agent of the Niagara, is 
i-ack after a long absence in the Northwestern field. 



The Conservative Life Insurance Company has entered the 
States of Minnesota and Iowa. 

Mr. C. J. Okell has been appointed General Agent of the 
Union Surety and Guaranty Company of Philadelphia. The 
company commenced business in 1899, and has capital stock 
paid up of $250,000. 

Mr. F. C. Peterson, cashier of the Commercial Union, is 
on duty again, after a vacation in the mountains. 

Secretary S. M. Marks, of the Pacific Mutual, is back from 
the Yosemite, where he spent his vacation. 

Mr. C. H. Ward, of the German of Freeport, is down in 
Los Angeles increasing his premium receipts. 

Mr. E. F. Green, of the New Amsterdam, is recovered 
from his recent sickness enough to again be at his desk. 

Mr. Rolla V. Watt, of the Royal, is down town again and as 
well as ever. 

San Francisco firemen have ten days' vacation each year, 
and two days each month. 

Mr. George W. Turner, of the Northwestern National, is 
in the southern part of the State. 

Mr. C. F Mullins, of the Commercial Union and Palatine, 
is registered at the ±iotel Cecil, London. 

Mr. W. J. Dutton, President of the Firemans Fund, has re- 

l turned from his Eastern vacation. He smilingly says (in 

spite of the way that things were done to him East — dinners 

and banquets), that after all there is no place like San 

Francisco. 

Three American Life insurance companies have almost 
$4,000,000 insurance in force in Denmark. They are the 
Itutual, Equitable, and New York Life. 



St. Louis A. B. C. Bohemian, the king of all bottled 

beers, brewed from the finest Canadian Barley and imported 
Bohemian Hops. 



200,000 H. P. 

Developed by 

Pelton Wheels 




Operating electric trans- 
mission plants alone : : : 

Sensitive Regulation 

Send lor illustrated oatsloeue. 

THE 
PELTON WATER WHEEL CO. 
127 Main St- San Francisco- Cal. 
1-13 Liberty St., New York. N.Y. 



niiiing machinery Spues 

The Ropp Straight Line Furnace. 

Huntington Centrifugal Roller Mill. 

Bartlett Concentrating Table. 

James Ore Feeder. 

Roger Improved Crushing Rolls. 

Dodge Rock Breakers and Pulverizers. 

Two and Three Stamp Mills. 

Engines, Boilers, Steam and Power Pumps. 

Wood-Working and Iron-Working Machinery. 

PARKE & LACY CO. 21 and 23 Fremont street. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE 
Ophlr Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 81 

Amount per share ISccnta 

Levied July 9. 1901 

Delinquent in office August 13. 190, 

Day of sale of delinquent stock September 2. 190} 

E. B. HOLMES. Secretary. 
Office — Hoom 50. Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery street. San Francisco, 
Cal. 

HP1TTVQ Business College 

UijiiLu u 2j post sTRfET 

""■■'•'■■™ ™ Illustrated Cnlnloeue Free. 



July 2ft 1901. 



SAN FRANCI8CO NEWS LETTER. 



19 



AT SANTA BARBARA. 
Nature has been generous to Santa Barbara. The most 
beautiful sifts In the way of ellmate nnri location h.ive been 
lavlsh—l upon her. and perpetual summer relcns The city 
Is situated on the Santa Barbara Channel. ~7:1 mil. s smith ol 
San Francisco, anil near It are the old Missions, established 
more than a century ago. 

Arlington Hotel is one of the attractions of Santa 
Barbara It has accommodations for four hundred guests, 
and lately It has undergone extensive -Improvements. Among 
other things a new passenger elevator has been put in and 
forty new hath rooms added. It has one hundred and ninety 
rooms, ninety-two with bath attached. All the rooms an 
luxuriously and tastefully furnished. The broad verandas 
of the hotel command a panoramic view of Santa Barbara 
and the hay and ocean. The old Missions arc within a short 
distance of the Arlington. Beautiful driveways through the 
woods and along the ocean beach are among the attractions 
of Santa Barbara, and the beach affords the best bathing 
on the coast. The situation of the Arlington makes all these 
forms of diversion handy of access. 

One of the main features of the Arlington is its dining 
room. 50x150 feet in size, and with seats for 250 guests. 
Special attention is paid to the cuisine, and the service is 
perfect. No metropolitan hotel can offer more for the comfort 
and convenience of guests. 



INSURANCE. 



The memory of Daniel O'Connell, the poet, will be kept 
green oy the erection at Sausalito of a granite seat with 
steps of the same material leading up to it. The memorial 
recital and O'Connell's last poem, "The Chamber of Sleep," 
will be inscribed upon the granite. The memorial will be in 
one of the most frequented parts of Sausalito, and the people 
of that town have agreed to assume its care. Messrs. Robert 
Aitken, the sculptor, and Newton J. Tharp, the architect, 
have collaborated in the design and will supervise the work. 
Sausalito was a favorite haunt of the Bohemian poet, and 
is a fitting place for the location of this tribute from his 
friends. 



If your clothes are stained or rusty send them to 

Spaulding's Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment, 127 Stock- 
ton street. They make an old suit look like new, and do it 
in remarkably quick time. They also clean gloves, neck- 
ties, curtains, tapestries, and all such articles with dispatch 
and thoroughness. Goods called for and delivered. 




Good food, good wine and good music make the 

Techau Tavern a gathering place for the society people of 
San Francisco. Drop around after the theatre. 

Pacific Coast department 

G. H. WARD, 

Manager, 

337 PINE STREET. 
INSURANCE COMPANY Sar. Francisco, Ca 

aw st&hihuport Phone, Main 5509. 

New Amsterdam Casualty Company 

of New York 

405 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal, 
Edmund P, Green, Manager. Jesse W. Lilienthal, Attorney. 

Employers' Liability, Accident, Burglary and Salary Insurance. 

Fire Association, of Philadelphia 
Philadelphia Underwriters, of Philadelphia 

PENN 

J. M. BECK, Manager 
219 Sansome street, San Francisco. Cal. 



" INSURANCE CO. 

of Brooklyn 



413 MONraO.YT.ERY ST , S. F. 

H. McD. SPENGER, 

General Agent for 

Pacific Coast, British Columbia 
ft nd Hawaiian Islands. 



FIRE, MARINE. AND INLAND IN8URANQE 



FIREMANS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



Capital $1,000,000 Assets, $4,000,000 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 



OF LONDON ENGLAND 



C. P. MTJLLINS. Manager. 416-418 California street. H. P. 
FIRE INSURANCE 



Founded A. D. 1792 

Insurance Oompany of / lorth America 

OP PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital $3,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders $5,022,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY. General Agent, 412 California street, 8. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720 
Capital Paid Up, J3.446.100 Assets. J24.662.043.35 

Surplus to Policy Holders. $8,930,431.41. Losses Paid Over, Jl84,000,000.00 

PACIFIC COAST BRANCH: 

__ . 501 Montgomery street. 

PRANK W. DICKSON, Manager 

HERMANN NATHAN & PAUL F. KINGSTON. Local Managers. 
FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New Zealand Insurance Gompany 

op New Zealand 
Capital, $6,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office In company's building, 312 California street 

_ W. P. THOMAS. Manager 

Hookeb & Lent, City Agents, 14 Post street 

Phoenix Assurance Co., of London 

Established 1782 

Providence-Washington Insurance Company 

Incorporated 1799 
BUTLER & HEWITT. General Agents 413 California street. S. F. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Go. 

OF HARTFORD 

Cash Capital $1,000,000.00 

Cash Assets 4,081,895.13 

Surplus to Polloy Holders 2,092,661.01 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager 
COLIN M. BOYD, San Francisco agent, 411 California street. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) OF LIVERPOOL 

Capital $6,700,000 

BALFOUR. GUTHRIE & CO., Agents 316 California street, S, F 

The Thuringia Insurance Gompany 

of ERFURT, GERMANY 
Capital, $2,250,000 Assets, JlO.984,248 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Manage 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome street, S, F. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany 
N. Schlesslnger, City Agent. 304 Montgomery St., S. F. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1901. 



Answers to Correspondents. 

By Ella Wilier Wheelcox. 



A World of Sin. 



You're a dreadful, dreadful place, 

World of sin. 
Oh, what oodles of disgrace 

You are in! 
You've a very wicked name 
And we know you're all to blame 
For our load of guilt and shame, 

World of sin. 

If we're liars or commit 

Any vice. 
Twas the world that prompted it, 

(Ain't that nice?) 
There is solace to be had 
In the fact the world's so bad — 
Though of course it makes me sad 

With it's vice. 

Let no square-toes mock our shame 

Or deride: 
'Tis the world that's all to blame. 

Let 'er slide. 
None of us the culprit is: 
'Tis the world that does the biz. 
Tempting us to joy and fiz 

Let 'er slide! 

"Dear Mrs. Wheelcox: 

I am a young lady member of the Epworth League, and as 
a Wabash delegate, I arrived in San Francisco last Saturday 
night. I went almost at once to my room in the Zion 
House, but I confess that I did not sleep very well. Do they 
celebrate the Fourth of July every Saturday night in your 
city? You must be very sinful. Everybody in your wicked 
city seemed to be out in the street and no one seemed to care 
to come in till four o'clock on Sabbath morning, when 
they all came in a body stamping through the hallways 
singing something about "tiger lily." Don't they ever sing 
Lily of the Valley and other good gospel hymns in this 
modern Sodom ? Early Sabbath morning I arose unrefreshed 
and prepared to attend church in Oakland. On my way to 
the ferry I was stopped by a long and gaily dressed pro- 
cession marching down the public street and accompanied 
by several bands of music playing ungodly tune.-;. The 
soldiers in the procession were carrying guns and the on- 
lookers were shouting "Hoch der Kaiser." The terrible sight 
lasted so long and put me in such a worldly frame of mind 
that I had no more desire to go to church so decided to take 
c, little trip to the Berkeley hills. The train on which I rode 



was packed full of men with rifles, many of whom showed the 
effects of having tasted of Rum and other stimulants. They 
all got off at Shell Mound Park, and I hoped vainly for a 
moment that they were attending a camp meeting, in a true 
Western way, but when I heard the reports of guns coming 
from within and the sounds of ungodly music I decided that 
it was time to take the return train for home. In the even- 
ing I saw a great number of enthusiastic young people going 
on the Haight street cars and said to Rev. Mr. Baker, 'What 
a large number of young people are attending the Christian 
Endeavor this evening. That at least is a hopeful sign.' 
But Mr. Baker only sighed and said, 'No, my poor unworldly 
daughter, there Is a French ball at the Chutes to-night.' 

Now, Mrs. Wheelcox, I hear that you are such a dear, 
sweet woman, always willing and anxious to advise and 
guide, so I come to you in my despair asking you if you think 
that San Francisco will ever become a Christian city — or 
do you think that the Epworth League has come to your fair 
shores all in vain? A. B. C. 

P. S. — I am glad that I have a return ticket home." 

Sweet child, you have my sympathy. I too was awake last 
Saturday night; I too saw the Sabbath display and parade; 
I too was aware that a French ball was running an opposition 
show to the Epworth League on Sunday night. Dear A. B. C, 
San Francisco may become a Christian city in course of time, 
but I say with all due hopefulness that the Epworth League 
has a Large Order on its hands. The fact that the Epworth 
League was a back number last Sunday was in a measure 
the fault of the Epworth League. If you feel that it is your 
duty to compete with the French and the Dutch it is up to 
you to let the city know that you are here. Get noisy. 
Get numerous. Wear uniforms. Travel in a crowd. Give 
the city her money's worth and don't let us feel lonesome 
while you are in town. 

A correspondent asks: "Does Faith Cure cure?" 
To her I answer in my own beautiful lines: 

Faith. 

When the coal is all out in the cellar. 

When the cash in the sack is all gone, 
When the shrewd-whooping blasts of the winter, 

Are yelling from sunset till dawn, 

When your job is played out and you know it. 
And you know that your wife knows it too, 

When your credit's not good at the grocer's, 
Have faith, puny mortal, pray do. 

Have faith, for you know in your trouble 
Though hungry you are and bereft. 

Still faith may be had for the asking — 
And that's about all you have left. 



KNOX'S 
GELATINE 



Please remember 
that Knox is spelled 



K=N=0=X 



Beware of concerns that 
try to imitate my name 
and package. 



I WILL MAIL FREE 



my book of seventy "Dainty Desserts for Dainty 
People," if you will send the name of your grocer. If 
you can't do this, send a two-cent stamp. For 5 cents in stamps, the book and full pint 
sample. For 15 cents the book and full two-quart package (two for 25 cents). Each 
large package contains pink color for fancy desserts. A large package of Knox's Gelatine 
will make two quarts (a half gallon) of jelly, 

CHARLES. B. KNOX, 91 Knox Avenue, Johnstown, N. Y. 








July 20, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

BANKING. 



21 



London and San Francisco Bank, u^m The Bank of California, San Francisco 



4M CALIFORNIA STREET. 
IIKAP OFFICK-TI Lombard .trcel. tandnn. 

Capital Aulhorlnd. l2J<n.(Ml. Capital Md Dp, tl.4H0.000. 

ntr*ctor»-Ilenrr Oo»chcn. Chairman. London; Charles Edward Itrrtlirr- 
lonl.nn.lon: Christian ,1c liulgne. s«n Francisco: fharlr* llcmcrr. 
London: John L. llowmrd. Son Francisco: Hen. It. KnpiK-l. London: Ifor- 
man D. Rldeout. San Fnnclwo; Arthur Bartrenw, London. 

Inspector ol Broncho*. Guslar Friedcrich. 

Agent. In New York. Mcsire. J. P. Morgan .<. 

BBAHOHBBl Portland. Orcion;TKom>. Wash.. Seattle. Wash- 

I-elter, ol credit turned available fnr travelers mid the purchase ol mor- 
chandlaeln any city ol the world. Deal In foreign and domestic excha ngo 
Account* ol country banks received. Term* on application. 

^ W. Mackintosh. Manager 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With which Is amalgamated The Bank ol British Columbia 

HEAD OFFICE-Toronto. 

Paid Up Capital, fs.000.000. Reserve Fund, ti.000,000. 

Aggregate Resources over IG5.000.000. 

Hon- Geo- A. Cor. President: B E. Walker. General Manager. 

•J. II. Hummer. Asst. General Manager. 

LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St.. E C. 8. Cameron Alexander. Manage 

NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. Alex- Laird and Win- Gray. 

Agents. 

ONTARIO: 44 BRANCHES- 

Quebec: Montreal: Manitoba: Winnipeg: Yukon District 
DawBon. White Horse; British Columbia: Atlin. Cranbrook. Fernie 
Greenwood. Karnloops. Nanalmo, Nelson, New Westminster, Rossland 
Sandon. Vancouver, Victoria. In the United States— New York, N. Y. San 
Francisco. Chi. Seattle. Wash. Portland. Ore- Skagway, Alaska. 
Bankers In London— The Bank oi Scotland: Messrs. Smith. Payne & Smiths 
Bankers in New York— The American Exchange National Bank. 
Agents In Chicago — The Northern Trust Company. Agents In New Orleans. 
—The Commercial National Bank. 
San Francisco Office: Walter Powell, Manager. A. Kains, Asst. Manager 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Cob. Sansohe and Suttbb Sts. 

Subscribed Capital t2.6OO.0OO Pald-Up Capital. t2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, tl ,000,000 

HEAD OFFICE— 40 Threadneedle street, London. E. C. 

AGENTS: New York — Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank. 

Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y.; Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cle, 17 

Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 

Commercial and Travelers' Credits Issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM. O. ALTSCHUL. Managers. 
R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Sansome and Pine Sts., San Francisco 
Jab. K. Wilsow, President Wm. Piebcb Johnson. Vice-President 

Lewis I. Cowoill, Cashier F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL. toOO.OOO 
SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS, 8130,000. 
DLRECTORS-- James K. Wilson. Wls. J. Dutton, Wm. Pierce Johnson. Geo 
A. Pope. H. E. Huntington, Henry Pierce, O. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS : New York—Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank: 
Chemical National Bank, Boston— National Bank of the Commonwealth 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co.: Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis 
—The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London--" 
Brown. Shipley & Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co. 

Germania Trust Company of San Francisco 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital, tl.OOO.OOO Paid-Up Capital and Reserve, $390,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian, or Trustee. 

Check Accounts of individuals, firms, and corporations solicited. 

Legal Depository for money in Probate Court proceedings. Interest 
paid on tbtjst deposits and SAVINGS. Invbstments carefully selected 
for our clients. 

Officers— F. Kronenberg, President; W. A. Frederick, vice-Presldent: H. 
Brunner, Cashier 

Board of Directors — F. Kronenberg, W. A. Frederiok, Fred A- Kuhls, E 
A. Denloke, A. G. Wieland, Fred Woerner. J. O. Rued, Fred O. Siebe 
John Rapp. 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cob, Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E, C. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 Paid Up $1,600,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 KeBerve Fund... 700,000 

Agents at New York— J, A W. Sellgman & Co.. 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the world 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange and bullion 
IGN. STEINHART, P. N. IJXIENTHAL, Managers. 



Security Sayings Bank 



222 Montgombby St., Mills Building. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 



William Alvord 
William Bttbcock 
Adam Grant 



S. L. Abbot, Jr. 
O. D. Baldwin 
W. S. Jones 



H. H. Hewlett 
E. J. McCutohen 
R. H.Peaae 



• tMiiui. tt.on 

Surplus, I. - 

I 'nil-, l.le.l Troili.. .luly 1. IW1I. I ' - I t 
VV1I.IUM AI.VOKIl I'rral.lrnt 1 THOMAS BROWH TWllW 

' HAKI.rX H. Illsllol- vi, e- l-rc-l ; I . K. M< H I rON lai'l Caahl*, 

U.t.KN M. t I.aV J Bm i Ul T I SAM H. DAWIBL8 A~l I *.hler 

CORRESPONDENTS 
New York-Mown. I.*ldlaw A Co.:tho Bank of Now V,,rk. N. B. A. 
lUltlmore— Tho National Exchange Bank. Boston - National Shawmul 
!**„"•. Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank: Pint National Bank. 
I Idladrlphla- Philadelphia National Bank. HI. Loid»— BonlnMa'l Hank. 
Virginia Cllv. Nev.— Agency ol The Bank ol California. Ixindon Mf>i< 
N. M. Rothschild A Sons. Paris— Mown, do Hothschlld Freres. Herlln- 
IHroetlon dor IHscnnto Uosellsehaft. (Iilim. Japan, and R»l In. lie. <1i«r- 
teroil Bank of India. Australia, and China. Australia and Now Zealand— The 
Union Bank of Australia. Ltd.. and Bank ol New Zealand. 
Letlen ol credit Imued. available In all parts of the world. 

Wells Fargo & Co. Bank 

N. E. Cob. Sansoms and Scttbb Sts. 
JOHN J. VALENTINE. President H. WADSWORTH. Cashier 

HOMER 9. KINO. Manager F. L. LIPMAN. Assistant Cashier 

II. L. MILLER. Second Assistant Cashier. 

Capital, Surplus and Undivided Prolits Deo. 31, 1900 t8.620.223.SS 

Branches— New York City. H. B. Parsons. Cashier: Salt Lake City. J. E. 
Dooly. Cashier: Portland, Or.. R. Left Barnes, Cashier, 
DIRECTORS— John J. Valentine. Andrew Christeson, Oliver Eldrldge. 
Henry E. Huntington. Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. MoCook 
John Bermlngham, Dudley Evans. 

The German Sayings and Loan Society 

NO. 626 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus $2,290,159.05 

Capital actually paid up In Cash 1.000.000 00 

Deposits June 29. 1901 29,886,288.11 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President. B. A. Becker: First Vice-President 
Daniel Meyer: Second Vice-President, H. Horstman; Cashier, A. H. R 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann: Secretary. George Tourny 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller: General Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

Ign. Slolnhart. E. Rohte H. B. Runs. N Ohlandt. John Lloyd, and I. N 
Walter. 

Mutual Sayings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,000,000. Paid Up Capital $300,000 

Jambs D. Phblan. President S. G. Mdbphy, Vice-President 

George A. Stoby, Cashier John A. Hooper, Vice-President 

C. B. Hobson, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, James 
Moffltt. Frank J. Sullivan, Robert MoElroy, Chas. S. Neal. James M. 
McDonald. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells. Fargo A Co., or Exchange on 
city banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

632 CALIFORNIA STREET, S. F. 

Deposits Jan 1, 1901... $27,881,798 Reserve Fund 8223.451 

Paid-up Capital 1,000,000 Contingent Fund 464,847 



E. B. POND, President 
LOVELL WHITE. Cashier 



W. O. B. DeFREMERY. Vice-President 
R. M. WELCH. Assistant Cashier 



Directors— Henry F. Allen, Thomas Mairee, W. C. B. de Fremery, O. O 
G. Miller, Robert Watt, George O. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin, .Jacob 
Barth, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms and farming 
lands in the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made In checks payable 
in San Francisco, Post Office, or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m, to 3 p. m.. and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only, 6:80 to 8 o'clock. 

Continental Building X< Loan Association 

Established In 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 
Subscribed Capital. .812,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund. ..8260, 000 
Paid-in-Capital 2,000,000 Monthly Income, over 100.000 

Its Purpose ib to help its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on Improved property, the members giving first Hens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help Its Stockholders to earn 8 to 12 per cent, per annum on their stock 
and allow them to open deposit accounts beating interest at the rate of 6 
per cent, per annum. 

Home Otli.ce— 222 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Wm. Corbin, General Manager 



Crocker-Wool Worth 



National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Corner Market, Montgomery and Pobt Sts. 

Paid-up-Capital 81,000 000 

Wm. H. Oeookee, President Gho. W. Kline, Cashier 

O. E. Green. Vioe -President W. Gregg. Jb„ Assistant Cashier 

Directors— W. H. Crocker. E. B Pond, George Crocker, C. E. Green. G-W. 
Kline. Henry J. Crocker. G. W. Scot'. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



A Honeymoon Eclipse 



Frank Goddard could not recall when 
the first cloud crossed the horizon of 
his marital happiness. It was so slight 
and evanescent in the beginning, a 
mere film o'er sunlit skies of May, that 
he laughed it away. — uenied its very 
existence. 

There had been some stir in fashion- 
able circles, when six months before he 
had borne away as his bride the fair 
Edith Wynne over the heads of far 
more eligible suitors. Society had re- 
ceived a shock from which it did not 
soon recover. The belle of many a 
ballroom, the heroine of many a ro- 
mance, witty, high-spirited, gifted, her 
blonde, statuesque beauty had been the 
least of her attractions. 

She might have taken her choice from 
among the prosperous and honored — she 
might even have netted a title bad she 
so willed; yet, to the despair of an am- 
bitious, scheming mother, who had 
toiled early and late to this. end, con- 
trary to the expectations of a multitude 
01 friends and admirers, she had sur- 
rendered at last to love. It was a mere 
summer's romance by the sea. Verily 
the ways of a maid with a man are past 
finding out. 

At the time she had gloried in sacri- 
ficing all for his sake; she had avowed 
herself wearied to satiety by the follies 
and exactions of fashion, and had set- 
down in the dainty, rose-embowered 
cottage in one of Boston's prettiest sub- 
urbs. What cared she in these early 
days for the world's verdict, the com- 
misseration of her own sex, who pre- 
dicted a speedy downfall for the poor 
little romance, and a sad awakening of 
the foolish heroine who in a moment 
of weakness had listened to the "traitor 
love?" 

He was a promising young lawyer, 
hopeful and ambitious. He could well 
bear comparison with the gay butter- 
flies of fashion who had fluttered about 
his fair Edith so many years. The 
essentials of true happiness were in 
their hands, and time would but deepen 
and. mature their mutual love. 

This was but the prelude. Ere he 
realized it the change had come, and the 
harmony of their lives was strangely 
n-.arred. In some inexplicable way it 
dawned upon his masculine intelligence 
that the girl was not happy; her spirits 
were fitful, now gay without cause, now 
gloomy and silent. 

She isolated herself for days :it a time 
in her own sanctum, a sunny room filled 
with the pictures and souvenirs of her 
girlish days. She still carried on a 
correspondence with an intimate friend, 
though her connection with the gay 
world had been severed and the haunts 
that had known her once knew her no 
more. Yet the exile was voluntary 
and contrary to his wishes; in vain he 
begged her to take a more active part 
in the pleasures of the day. Save for 
an occasional concert or matinee, she 



kpet Your Share Of The,, 
.COMFORT, 

.EASE. 



^the 

SUSPENDER 

Sold everywhere or 

tiy mail, W cents. 
C A. Edition ili u -.« ... 
Box in, bbirlej, n«».. 





PRESIDENT 

Trimmirics can not 
rust. If tne mime 
l 'I > renldcnt"iaonlhe t 
buckles it's genuine. 



July 20, 1901. 



% 



Pabst beer 
is always pure 



betrayed little interest in what was 
passing. 

In vain, with a man's dense ignor- 
ance of a girl's nature, he sought to 
fathom her many varied moods. Was 
it mere idle longing for the excitement 
of the world of fashion or regret for a 
step taken in a moment of impulse, a 
lude awakening from a dream of love, 
and a realizing sense of u.e sacrifice 
she had made? 

Another man would have solved the 
mystery on the moment; would have 
frankly accused or exacted fullest ex- 
planation of what he could not under- 
stand. Not so Frank Goddard, chival- 
rous almost to Quixotism in his rela- 
tions with women, noble in his judg- 
ments, reticent to a fault. 

He suffered in silence as time went 
on and the mystery deepened. The 
lovely girl grew slender and shadowy 
beneath his longing eyes and devoted 
care, and the happiness on which he 
had staked his all seemed slipping from 
him day by day. 

At last he yielded to the ciushing 
conviction that she no longer loved 
him: yet, true to the letter of her vows, 
From which the fair spirit had fled, that 
she still strove with a woman's rare 
subtlety to conceal the loss from him. 
Then crowning this belief a new fear 
stole snake-like into his thought and 
coiled there ready to strike. 

One night the postman delivered into 
his hands a heavy packet for Edith, 
which he carelessly gave her with some 
laughing allusion to her voluminous 
correspondence. The girl flushed and 
paled: then she fled to her room to 
read it in solitude. All the evening she 
was sad and spiritless, and to his quick- 
ened fancy it appeared that she had 
been weeping. 

That night he hardly slept. On the 
following day he returned from the 
office earlier than his wont, still with 
the terrible suspicion that had haunted 
him for twenty-four hours. 

A note on the mantel announced that 
Edith had gone to a theatre party and 
would not return till midnight. Then 
Frank Goddard, impelled by an irre- 
sistible impulse, committed an act 
which he was never able to justify to 
his conscience. 

He entered his wife's sanctum and 
stood irresolute, looking about him. 
The dainty room, with its pictured walls 
and filmy lace draperies, seemed in- 
stinct with the girlish presence: the 
odor of fresh violets was in the air; a 
white shawl clung with careless grace 
to her rocking-chair. 

He opened her writing-desk. It was 
littered with letters, crossed and re- 
crossed by a dainty hand; — confessions, 
no doubt, to the friend of her soul. 
Closing it with a savage snap, he 
plunged his hand in the waste-basket 
drew out at random a crumpled note. 



and spread it before him. At the first 
words he caught his breath and threw 
all scruples to the wind. 

"My darling — " it began; it was a 
love-letter to make a man's pulse leap, 
coming from such a source — with tears 
and tenderness between the lines. 
When in the height of their happiness 
had she ever written him in so moving 
a strain? In bitterness and rebellion 
she laments her fettered state, and 
wonders what the end will be, now that 
true love had been revealed to her. 

"Oh, why — why did you not speak be- 
fore it was too late?" was the girl's 
cry of despair. 

It was true, too true. The blow struck 
him full on the heart, like a clenched 
hand. His senses reeled at the sudden 
confirmation of his worst suspicions. 

For this had he been led to step by 
step, and as a somnambulist walks, into 
his wife's sanctum, now invaded and 
not a loop to hang doubt upon; each 
word of the fatal letter seemed branded 
on his memory as by fire. 

Now, in very truth, could he echo the 
words of the hapless Moor. "Farewell 
the tranquil mind! farewell content!" 
His high ideal lay prostrate at his feet; 
his world was in ashes. 

Long he sat thus in the silent room, 
now revolving the past, now bitterly 
condemning the girl who had wrecked 
his happiness. 

Then a sudden fury of passion shook 



"A Genuine Old Brandy made from Wine. 

— Medical Ptui iLondon), Aug. ISM 

MARTELLS 
THREE STAR 
BRANDY 

ST ALL RESORTS AND RESTAURANTS 

WILLIAM WOLFF & CO., san francisoo 
Pacific Coast Acents 



J, D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO. 

Shipping and Commission Merchant 
General agents 

Oceanic Steamship Company 

GUltueham Cement. 

337 Harket street, cor. Fremont, S, F 



July 20. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 



him. a burning desire for vengeance 
swift Mid remorseless, he crn.-i 

in his grasp, as hi- pace I to ami 
fro with restless trei.d. vainly > 
of the man who ha ■' 
him this stnh in toe ilark. 

Hail Edith entered at that moment, 
she would have recoiled before his 
haggard countenance. She would 
tremble beneath Uie tempest her own 
fair hand had evoked Hut. all un- 
knowing the crisis that had fallen In 
her absence, she did not appear until 
the house was silent and darkened 
for the night. On the following day 
and for many another Frank Goddard 
wore a mask that even a woman's eye 
could not penetrate. 

What will he the end?" was the girl's 
hopeless cry to her lover; and in her 
own heart It echoes and reechoes, as 
he pursues the weary routine of daily 
life, unbrlghtened now by one hope for 
the future. Yet he raises no hand to 
stay the course of events; in stoical 
silence he awaits the last act of the 
tragedy — and time sweeps relentlessly 
on. 

But one night in the early springtime, 
when the air is rife with subtle scents 
and sounds, as he crosses the thresh- 
old to an empty house, a sense of deso- 
lation steals over him, a premonition 
of coming evil, that no reason can 
dispel. As on many another occasion 
a careless note warns him of some girl- 
ish pleasure or invitation to a friend's; 
but to-night he feels with deadliest cer- 
tainty that the end has come. 

As he sits thus alone in the twilight, 
with the breath of spring stealing 
through the open window, the misery 
and mockery of it all sink like iron 
into his soul. He lives over from fair 
beginning to bitterest ending, the 
strange, fleeting tale of his love; the 
hopes and aspirations that heralded its 
coming, the dark and fathomless abyss 
to which it had fallen. 

Then for a moment the old passion re- 
vives, but he shakes it from him and 
tramples it underfoot; for well he 
knows that if the wayward girl has gone 
from him in a mood of mad impulse 
time will avenge his wrongs. 

How long he sat thus he never knew; 
there came a light footfall on the walk; 
the click of a key in the door, and 
a moment later the room was flooded 
with light, and Edith, in opera cloak 
and evening dress, stood revealed like 
a radiant vision to his bewildered sight. 

"Frank, dear," he hears her say in a 
far-away voice, "I have a confession to 
make to-night; a secret to reveal that 
has burdened me for many a mouth. 
It has been on the tip of my tongue to 
tell you, but I vowed to be silent till 
success had crowned my work and justi- 
fied my ambition." 

"Edith, what do you mean?" he fal- 
tered. 

"Frank, I have written a novel; such 
a romance, full of love and dramatic 
complications. It has been accepted, 
and will come out this spring; now, 
don't tell me you suspected it, dear." 

"No, no — not that," faintly. 

"Such a period of excitement and sus- 
pense as I've passed through this win- 
ter! I could scarcely eat or sleep for 
thinking of it, and yet what happiness 
it has given me! But I did feel guilty 
at my first secret from you, Frank; 
another man would have questioned or 
suspected me, and if you had chanced 

to see my manuscript But how pale 

you look. You have been overworking, 
dear, I know it." And dropping her 



v^tm»'*s 



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The Original and Genuine Worcestershire 

All successful cooks use LEA&PERRINS' 
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soups, fish, meats, gravy,game.salads etc 



I O' IMITATIONS 



•Sl&IMATURC ^ J ,/} 

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'osr-~—t """"' """"lis Sons 



mantle. Bhe leaned caressingly against 
him like a young goddess i:i her blonde 
loveliness. 

"No, no— my girl.' he protested; still 
with the same dream-like sensation up- 
on him. "But about this novel of yours? 
I am interested. What is the title, 
my dear?" 

"A Honeymoon Eclipse." 
A Honeymoon Eclipse?" he echoed. 
"A strange title." 

"But true to the story, Frank. I some- 
times think that nothing is too strange 
to be true." 

And though he said nothing, in his 
heart he voiced the sentiment of the 
unconscious authoress. 
— Julia M. Knight, in The Bohemian. 



"And now. gentlemen," said the re- 
nowned bric-a-brac auctioneer, "allow 

me lo luing before your notice the 
gem of the collection. It is a document 
of undoubted authenticity, but of great 
rarity. Very few of its class are in 
existence. 

"The signature, gentlemen, is perfect. 
Voti may see it for yourselves. Oh, yes, 
sir. you may examine it." 

And the dealer fn antiquities grace- 
fully waved before the admiring throng 
a receipted tailor's bill, the erstwhile 
property of Mr. Flashington Dasher. 



It was in a Pullman sleeper, and just 
across from the bachelor's berth was 
a handsome little woman and her three- 
year-old boy. Early in the morning the 
two were laughing and playing together, 
and the good-natured bachelor smiled 
to himself as he arose to dress. Sud- 
denly a little foot peeped out from 
the curtains of the opposite berth, and 
with a twinkle in his eye the bachelor 
grabed the plump toe, and began: "This 
little pig went to market, this little 

" "That is my foot, sir," said the 

indignant voice of a woman. The si- 
lence which followed could be heard 
above the roar of the train. 



"I thought you were working on 
Krank's new house," said the house 
painter's friend. "I was going to," re- 
plied the house painter, "but I had a 
quarrel with him, and he said he'd put 
the paint on himself." "And did he 
do it?" "Yes, that Is where he put 
most of it." 



"Mamma," said four-year-old Willie, 
"let's play I am your mamma and you 
are my little girl." "Very well, dear," 
replied his mother. "How shall we be- 
gin?" "Well," answered the little fel- 
low, "you can ask me for a piece of 
pie, and I'll tell you pie isn't good for 
little girls." 



"You are looking handsome to-night, 
Miss Flyte," Bagster remarked in the 
pauses of the dance. "So Mr. Smythe 
told me a few minutes ago." Bagster 
(only remembering that Smythe is his 
hated rival) — Well, you wouldn't be- 
lieve anything that chump said, would 
you?" 



"Tommy, if your father shot three 
rabbits yesterday and two to-day, how 
many would that make in all?" Tommy 
(wisely) — Fourteen rabbits, three foxes 
and five deer. 



Mrs. Newlywed (to cook, whom she 
has just engaged in registry office) — 
You see, my husband is so very particu- 
lar about his food. Cook (sympatheti- 
cally) — They're all alike, mem. My old 
man was just the same. I never cooked 
nothink to please him in my life! 



Farmer (to young thief) — What are 
you doing under the tree with that 
inple? 

Bright Boy — I was just going to climb 
up the tree to put back this apple, 
-vhich, I see, has fallen clown. 



A Philadelphia woman who went shop- 
ping twenty years ago has just leturned 
home," read Mrs. Bellingham in the 
paper. 

"It took a long time to match that 
ribbon," commented Mr. Bellingham. 



OVERLANIT 
MONTHLY 1 

Joey irvto tKo\jyekt\dy i 
"/ Kotne/- tKiwt Ea^y-t- 
err\ n\a^a«irvey 

"i\ever enter d 



r OverIai\rf 
Monthly 

arv illustrated 

nv?\s.ak.z ' *ve * ,K * 
, we.yt.orve dol- 
lar* per year 

-/"elvd & dim.e>or 
-*"e.n\.ple espy 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1901. 



"^^^HIMWW 




Stolen From Thieves. 



Joseph Rend was telling a little coterie of men at the 
Great Southern Hotel a funny story recently narrated to him 
by Governor McCorkle, of West Virginia. A colored man 
was telling a white friend about another negro who owed 
him two dollars and absolutely refused to pay the debt. The 
creditor dunned and dunned him, but all to no purpose. 
Finally the creditor went to his white friend, who is a lawyer, 
and poured his tale of woe into his ear. "Well," said the 
lawyer, "if he positively refused to pay you, what reason did 
he give?" "Well, boss," said the colored man, "he said he 
had owed me dat money fo' so long dat de interest had dun 
et it all up, and he didn't owe me a cent." 

They were in the heat of a discussion on the art of court- 
ing. "Why do you speak like an idiot, George?" said his 
wife. "To hear you talk, the neighbors will be thinking I 
asked you to marry me! And, goodness knows, I never ran 
after you in my life!" "I'm not saying you ran after me," 
he replied. "But that don't prove nothing. I'm aware that 
the trap never runs after a mouse." And, ramming his hands 
deep into his pockets, with a long sigh, he muttered: "But 
somehow it appears to gather him in, just the same!" 

At the instant the cannibal king clapped his hands a slave 
appeared. "Sirrah," said his majesty, "did you provide the 
captive with champagne and the fat of the land?" The 
menial bowed low in signification that there had been full 
compliance with the royal will. "And did he," the savage 
potentate demanded, "make a hog of himself?" "He did, 
your highness." "Then" — the imperial countenance was 
wreathed with smiles — "we shall have sausages and bacon 
for breakfast in the morning!" 

A gentleman one day saw a boy peeling the bark from one 
of his choice trees with a hatchet. The gentleman tried to 
catch the boy, but the latter was too quick for him, so the 
farmer changed his tactics. "Come here, my little son," 
he said, in a soft, flute-like voice, with counterfeited friend- 
liness, "come here to me a minute. I want to tell you some- 
thing." "Not yet," replied the recipient. "Little boys like 
me don't need to know everything." 

"Doctor, I'm bothered with a severe pain. When I bend 
forward, stretch out my arms and make a semi-circular move- 
ment with them, a sharp sting comes in my left shoulder." 
"But," asked the physician wonderingly, "why make such 
motions?" "Well, if you know any other way for a man to 
get on his overcoat, I wish you'd let me know." 

Young Lady — Give me one yard of — . Why, haven't I seen 
you before? Young Clerk — Maud, can you have forgotten 
me? I saved your life at the seaside last summer. Young 
Lady (warmly) — Why, of course you did! You may give me 
two yards of this ribbon, please. 

It was Sunday evening. He stood pensive, looking at the 
unsympathetic surf. On the morrow he would be again 
behind the ribbon counter. "Good waves," he soliloquized, 
"we be one blood. We arrive at the shore in great style — ■ 
and we go away broke!" 

Hibernian Nurse — "Arrah, wake up, wake up!" Hospital 
Patient (drowsily) — "What is it? Hibernian Nurse — "It's 
time for your slaping medicine, sir; so it is." 

Mag — He ain't no good, HI. He's one of these fellers wot 
chooses the price first, an' then runs his fingers along the 
bill o' fare to see wot he gets for it. 



— You will always get the best, served in the most irre- 
proachable style, by going to the Cafe Zinkand. The best 
people in town make it their headquarters after the theatre. 
Good wines and excellent music. 



Fay & Foster, proprietors of the Grand Hotel Cafe, 

seem to have found just what business men want in the 
shape of lunch. Their place is crowded every day between 
11 and 2 by business and club men. 




Speaks for itself 

Pearline. That accounts for its 
quick and large success. A five 
cent package of Pearline 
m>.~'A (follow the directions) 
shows you the ease, com- 
fort and quickness of washing 
with little or no rubbing. You 
won't see all the wear and tear that it saves, 
perhaps, until later, when you find that the 
clothes last longer. °vi 



Automobiles 



If you want to know how to get one 
write for particulars. 

We build to order Gasoline Auto- 
mobiles, Steam Automobiles and 
Automobile parts. 

Automobiles cared for, repaired 
and delivered on telephone order. 

California Automobile Co., 



Factory, 346 McAllister St. 
Phone Jessie 366- 



Main Office, 222 Sansome St 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society. 

The Board of Directors declared a dividend for the term outline June 30. 
1901. at the rate of three and one-eighth (3%) per cent per annum on all 
deposits free of taxes, and payable on and after July 1, 1901. Dividends 
not called for are added to, and bear the Bame rate of dividend as the prin- 
cipal from and after July I, 1901. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 

Office— 101 Montgomery St.. cor. Sutter St., San Francieoo, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE, 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Company. 

For the six monlhs ending June 30. 1901. dividends have been de- 
clared on deposits in the Savings Department of this Company as follows; 
On Term Deposits, at the rate of three six-tenths (3 G-10) per cent per 
annum, and on Ordinary Deposits at the rate of three (3) percent per annum, 
free of taxes, and payable on find after Monday. July. 1, 1901. Divi- 
dends uncalled for are added to the principal and bear the same rate of 
dividend as the principal from and after July 1. 1901. 

J. DALZELL BROWN, Secretary. 

Cor. California and Montgomery Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank ol San Francisco. 

For the half-year ending June 30lh. 1901, a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of three (3) per cent per annum on nil deposits, free of taxes, 

payable on and after Monday, July 1, 1901- 

GEORGE A. STORY, Cashier. 
33 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this society, held June 
28.1901, a dividend has been declared at the rate of three and one-eighth 
i :i' - * per cent, per annum on all deposits for the si \ months ending June 30, 
1901, free from all taxes, and payable on and after July 1, 1901. 

ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

Office— Corner Market McAllister and Jones streets. San Franclsoo, Cal, 



July 20. 1901. 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




AT THE DOOR. 
Kiiscne Field). 

I thought myself indeed secure. 

So fast the door, so firm the look:' 
Bat, lo! the toddling comes to lure 
My parent ear with timorous knock. 

My heart were stone could it withstand 
The sweetness of my baby's plea. — 
Inat timorous knocking and — 

"Please let me in — it's only me." 

I threw aside the unfinished book, 
Regardless of its tempting charms, 
And, opening wide the door I took 

My laughing darling in my arms. 

Who knows but in eternity. 

I like a truant child shall wait 
The glories of a life to be, 

Beyond the Heavenly Father's gate. 

And will that Heavenly Father heed 
The truant's supplicating cry, 
As at the door I plead, 

"'Tis I, O Father, only I!" 



IN IDLENESS. 

(SI. Louis Mirror). 

To lie upon the grass and watch the herds 

Deep standing in the river, and to see 

The barred gold glisten on the bumble-bee, 
And note the noisy gossip of the birds; 
To mark the blue horizon-rim that girds 

That purple world beyond, Infinity — 

Under the shade of a wild cherry-tree, 
To wait, and listen, hampered not by words — 
This was our gladness, on a long June day, 

Companioned by the lazy lapse of hours, 
While ebbed the slow, enchanted time away, 

Where bird-songs came, like intermittent showers, 
And drowsy sweet upon us where we lay 

The perfume of the elderberry flowers. 



JEALOUSY. 

(St. Louis Mirror). 

If to be jealous is to hope to gain 

Your every longing — make all other men 
As misty to your memory as when 

The shadows slip across a window-pane: 

If to be jealous is to wish to reign 

Your one true lover, chide me once again, 
Call me as jealous as Othello then 

And all your chidings will be given in vain. 

For I am one who cannot make my cheek a liar; 

The tissue of' my nature was not wrought 
Of lifeless clay, devoid of Pagan fire, 

And long in storm; and anguish have I sought 
And now have found, at last, my Heart's Desire. 



SONG. 
(Br Grace Denio Litchfield). 
Were I yon star whose silvery ray 

Turns dusk to day, 
Lo, I would hide me till you came, 

Then burst • in flame 
Athwart the darkness on your sight, 

And die in light. 
Were I yon rose whose fragrance rare 

Scents all the air, 
I would not blossom till the day 

You passed this way, 
Then pour my heart out in perfume 

And die in bloom. 

Were I yon lark whose sunny song 

Sounds all day long, 
Lo, I would hush me till you passed, 

Then wake at last, 
Spread my glad wings out toward the sky, 
Sing once and die. 



LADIES CAN WEAR SHOES 

■ 'i,*iirr liter u«lne AD*i 
I m»U' llglil <>r m 
- • • ■ ■, ■ anion*. It's ihr sr««u 
pimI pc- i ti f««l, ntlator*, ta\ 

Ram I* ft rrrl«1n < «rc |..r BWFAllnff, hot. \\ ,;, lni ee |*U rikI 

-rem. So, Trial paokaffe PKEK by mad. .Vllrr-.. Allen T Otm«t*<l 
U Roy, N. Y. 




FELIX'S ROTISS£Rie, 

Felix Gouailnardou, proprietor, (formerly with 

Jack's Itolisaerie), 637 California street, below 

Kearny. Private rooms for families and banquets 

Telephone Black 2906 



Gray Bros. 



228 Montgomery Street, Sun Francisco. 
205 New High Street. Lob Angeles. 

Concrete and artificial 
stone work. 



Murphy, Grant & Co., 



Agents for the 



(Formerly In Mills Bulletins; 



BALTIMORE 

MT. VERNON-WOODBERRY COTTON DUCK CO. 

Importers of Staple and Fancy Dry Goods. Manufacturers of furnishing 
goods. Patentees and sole manufacturers of The " Never-RIp " Overall. 
The best In the world. 

Full Lfne of Spring Goods 

J. R. SMITH 
Tailoring Co., 

310 Bush St., under Russ House, S. F. 

Joseph Oillott's Steel Pens, THEAWAS c S I o'iGo.i 89 8 

"Grand Prix" Paris, 1S00. The Highest Possible 
Award- These pens are " the best In the world." 
Sole agent for the United Statep. 
Mb. Hen by Hob, 01 John street. New York. 
Sold by all stationers. 

A. B. TREAD WELL Attorney-at-Law 

(Formerly Judge Police Court No. i) 
HAS RESUMED PRACTICE at 533 Kearny St., cor. Sacramento St. 
Al legal business attendedto promptly. 

Samuel M. Shortridge, Atty-at-Law 

Crocker Building, San Francisco. 



THE CHAMPAGNES OF 

Moet & 
Cbctndon 

White Seal and Brut Imperial 

now being marketed are of the celebrated vintage of 1893. 

Messieurs. Moet & Ghandonare the most extensive vineyard pro- 
prietors in the world and their Champagnes are having a larger sale 
and are of a quality far superior to any other brand, being used al- 
most exclusively at all ultra-fashionable functions, among others at 
the Admiral Dewey Collation, Vanderbilt, Astor, Bradley-Martin, 
Belmont, and Stuy vesant Fish affairs.— New York Wine Circular. 



WILLIAM WOLFF & CO., 



Pacific Coast Agents. 



Market Stre.t, 3. F. 



ANDERSON SPRINGS. 

Only natural Mineral Steam Baths in 

LAKE COUNTY. 
Hot Sulphur and Iron Baths. 
Board: $10 to $14 per week. 
Baths free. Address, 

J. ANDERSON, Anderson Springs, Middletown, 
Lake County, California. 

Fare, San Francisco to Springs and return reduced 
to $8. Send for circular. 
Full particulars at S. F. News Letter, 5[/^ Kearny St., S. F. 

HOBERG'S RESORT. 

Pleasantly located in a pine forest three thousand 
five hundred feet altitude; highest elevation, low- 
est price. First-class family table and pleasant 

rooms, eight dollars per week. 
Surrounding scenery unsurpassed by any springs 
in the immediate vicinity. Stage daily. Buy tickets 
direct for Hoberg's, Lake County, California. 

George Kammerer and Mrs. M. Hoberg, Proprietors. 

Full particulars at S. F. News Letter office. 

HOTEL BENVENUE AND COTTAGES. 

LAKEPORT, CAL. 
LAKEPORT'S SUMMER RESORT. Situated overlooking 
the shore on Clear Lake. New pavilion, boathouse, and bowl- 
ing alley. Open all the year. Special facilities for accommo- 
dating families with children; home cooking; boating, bath- 
ing, hunting, and superior fishing. Lovely drives and walks. 
Rates: $7 per week. 

FRANK & A. M. SCALES, Proprietors. 

LAUREL DELL LAKE 

LAKE COUNTY. 
THE ORIGINAL SWITZERLAND OF AMERICA. 

Fishing, Hunting, Boating, (new boats) Tennis, Bowling 
Alley, Dancing and Music, best and largest dance hall In 
Lake County, beautiful drives and walks, new and first class 
livery Largest dining room in Lake County, built over lake. 
Cottages. 

Under new management. Address, 

EDGAR DURNAN, 
Laurel Dell, Lake County, Cal. 



CYPRESS VILLA. 



B STREET, San Rafael, near Narrow Gauge. 

NOW OPEN. This favorite resort has been newly 
furnished and has undergone an entire renovation. 
For families, tourists, and the public generally, the 
accommodations are unexcelled. Board by day, 
week or month. New management. 

MRS. WARBURTON, Proprietor. 



Monterey County, Cal. 

F. W. Schroeder, Manager. 



C. T. Romie, Proprietor 



Blue 



DUNCAN SPRINGS. 

HOPLAND, CAL. 

Lovely drive oi' two miles from station to hotel. 
Terms: $10 to $12. Best medicinal waters in the 
State. Housekeeping cottages to rent. 

O. HOWELL, Hopland, Cal. 



FARAISO HOT SPRINGS. 

The Carlsbad of America 

Open Winter and Summer 



THE SWITZERLAND OF AMERICA. 
Boating (new boats), bathing, fishing and 
hunting. Dancing and music every even- 
ing except Sundays. Best dance hall in 
Lake County. Fine table; only white 
cooks employed. Send for new pamphlet 

WEISMAN, Midlake P. O., Lake County, Cal. 



Lakes 



SKAGGS' HOT SPRINGS. 



Sonoma County, only 4% hours from San Francisco; but 9 miles 
staging; waters noted for medicinal virtues; best natural bath In 
State; good trout streams; telephone, telegraph daily mail and ex- 
press; i rst-class hotel and staqe service; morning and afternoon 
stages. Round trip from Pan Francisco, only 85.50. Take Tiburon 
fpvry at 7.30 a. m. or 3.3 ■ p. m. Term«, 82 per day or 812 per week. 
References: Any guest of the past fix years. For further informa- 
tion address 

J. F. MULGREW, Proprietor. 

SKAGGS. GAL. 



HOWARD SPRINGS. 



plcturpsquely situated amidst the pine forests of Lake County — the 
Switzerland of America. Elevation 2300 feet; no fog: c imate perfect. 
Natural hot mineral plunge and tub baths, fine medicinal drinking 
water, Excellent fishing and hunting. Telephone on premises. 
Rates, 810 and Si 2, with special terms for families. Ac- 
comodations, tahle and service first-clnss. Round trip from San 
Francisco, via Napa, Caiistoga. 810, including fine stage drive. 
For accommodations and further particulars address 



MRS. R. J. BEEBY, Proprietor. 



HOTEL MOUNT VIEW. 

CHANGED HANDS. Will hereafter be open the year 
rourd. Bus meet* 9.30 and 11 o'clock trains from city at 
present. Th* culinary department will receive special 
attention. For rates and particulars address, 

Hotel Mount View, Ross Valley, Marin County, Cal. 

PACIFIC CONGRESS SPRINGS. 

An ideal spot in the Santa Cruz Mountains. Two hours 
from San Francl-co. Five miles from Los Gatos. No 
tir- some staging. Delightful climate. Mineral water 
and table unsurpassed. Boating, swimming and fishing 
and all out-door sports. One of the best tennis courts 
on the Coast. Entire new management. 

A. S. OLNEY, Manager. 

THE GARDEN CITY SANITARIUM. 

Thoeoughly Equipped with all modern appliances. X-ray. All 

forms water treatment, the fin- st Static Galvanic Sinusoidal and Faradlo 
Electrical apparatus. A Corps of well-trained nurses of both sexes 
skilled in all forms of treatments and manipulations Rest Cure scientlno- 
cally carried out. * " * * A quiet home-like place, beautiful scenery 
Mount Hamilton and the famous Lick Observatory in plain view; one 
block from electric cars, fifteen minutes walk from the center of the city 
Terms 810 to 820 per week, including medical attention and regular treat 
ment- 

Garden City Sanitarium, East San Jose, Cal. 



GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL 

Felton, Santa Cruz County, Cal. 
A. J. GASS, Proprietor. 



Six miles from Santa Cruz, 
and % mile from big tr ea. 
Bus meets all trains. Terms 

reasonable. 



HOTEL KNICKERBOCKER 



BLITHEDALE 

Mill Valley, Cal. 



VAN NESS AVENUE, 
San Francisco. 



J. A. ROBINSON. 



CALISTOGA & CLEAR LAKE STAGE LINE 

Di^eot to Harbin. Anderson, Adams, Howard, Aslorg, 
Glenbrook, Hoburgs and Selglers Springs. Teams and sad- 
dle horses, etc. Write 

WM. SPIERS, Calistoga. 



y 20. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



OBITUARY. 

Ntwi hi 

Mr Mead, fonnerl) "f s»n Frani lu:i< 

bat no particulars h 
many yours hiail mnst. r ,.r Trinity School, of this i Itjr, anil 
hail boon t aiding He 

had koih- for h to Guat&mala, to porsai there 

his birortte study of ornithology. Rer. Mr Head ».-.- ■ irrail 
uatc of Km in, College, and came to this cltj In ' Vv With 
"<n of foui years he was connected with Trlnlt? 

il up to the time o! his death. He had marked ability, 
nnl only as an Instructor, urn as 8 classical scholar and a 

writer. 



We have received N \V Ayres & Sons Newspaper An- 
imal for 1901, In this volume Ayres & Son have main' 
this publication's standard as a complete work of refi 
in the newspaper line. Il contains a catalogue of all the per- 
iodicals of every nature published in the Dnited States 
and its territories, and in Canada, Cuba and the West 
Indian islands. It is thorough in every way. giving the cir- 
culation, politics, and class of the different papers, and much 
other valuable information. The population of towns and 
counties, and their principal industries, are given, in addition 
to the statistics in regard to the newspapers. 



In Substitute Feeding 
for infants, physicians agree that cow's milk is ths basis 
lor all beginnings. What is required then is the best possi- 
ble milk product. Borden's Eagle Brand Condensed Milk 
is ideal, pure, sterile, and guarded against contamination. 



St. Louis A. B. C. Bohemian, the king of all bottled 

beers, brewed from the finest Canadian Barley and imported 
bohemian Hops. 



Leopold, the florist, of 34 Post street, has an unusually 

fine display of flowers at present. He takes a proper pride 
in keeping the best stock in town. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 510 Montgomery street. 

San Fran-.'.sco. deals In all kinds of newspaper Ir formation. 
buslDedS. persona,, political, from press of Stiite. Coast, an 
cotiotr) Tel. Main H>I2 



— Southfield Wellington Coal 
the best for all purposes. 



HARBIN SPRINGS 



The Most Accessible and Most Desirable in Lake County. 

Contain Sulphur, Iron, Magnesia, and Arsenic. 
Open the Year Round. Hotel. Cottages and Grounds Liehled 
with Acetylene Gas. "Wonderful cures of rheumatism, eout, 
dyspepsia, catarrh, paralysis, neuralgia, dropsy, blood poison- 
inc. skin diseases, kidney, liver and stomach troubles. A Nat- 
ural Mineral or Medicated Mud Rath has just been discovered; 
nothing like it known. Don't Miss Harbin Springs During May 
and June. The most delightful months in the year. Absolutely 
free from raosouitoes. Perfect climate: no excessive heat; fin- 
est vegetable garden in the State. Perfectly equipped livery 
stable In connection with hotel. Home dairy. Popular amuse- 
ments. Two hard-finished cottages just completed ONLY SIX 
HOURS from San Francisco. Stage diiily from Califtoga to 
Springs. Round-trip tickets at S. P, office, 88- Fine hunting and 
fishing. Rates reasonable. Long distance telephone. 
J. A. HAYS, Proprietor. 

CALIFORNIA HOT SPRINGS 

Hot springs, but not a sanitarium. Formerly AguaCaliente Springs, Sonoma 
Valley. No staging; 46 miles via C. N. Railway or S. P. R. R. Immense 
swimming tank. Splendid table. Come Sundays — try it. Round trip, 
?l.lu. Telephone. Expensive improvements. $12 and ?14. 

COOPER & SHEDDEN, Agua Caliente, Cal. 

GIBBS RESORT 

In the Santa Cruz Mountains 

Hotel, cabins, camp ground, Redwood groveB. Fishing, shoot- 
ing. Cream, milk, poultry, and fresh fruit in abundance. One 
of the most healthful and picturesque resorts In the mountains. 
A. W. J. GIBBS, Proprietor, 
GIBBS, 
Santa Cruz Co., Cal. 

PARK HOUSE Be " L< "" " d . Cal - 

Pleasant surroundings, beautiful scenery, good table, fish- 
ing, and fine drives. MRS. I. N. HAYES. 



k^H^HbTOSORTS^^F^ 



HOTEL VENDOME. SAN JOSE, CAL 

One of California's most attractive resorts. The start- 
Ing point for Lick Observatory. The center of an 
orchard section of unparalleled beauty, through which 
finely graded and watered roads, for cycling and driv- 
ing, lead in every direction. The most thoroughly-kept 
and -p-to-date hotel in Central California. 

For further information call at Traveler office, 20 
rVtontgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., or address 

GEO. P. SNELL, Manager. 



Arlington Hotel 



SANTA BARBARA 



The finest summer climate in the State. Sea bathing 
every day in the year. The best green turf golf links 
in California; five minutes' street car ride from the 
hotel. Special low rates during the summer. 

E. P. DUNN, Proprietor. 



Arcadia 

CAMPUS STATION 

Santa Cruz Mountains 

Delightfully located, 
half a mile from 
Big Trees. New 
hotel newly fur- 
nished. Electric 
lighted. Hot and 
cold water. Porce- 
lain tubs. 





Jfj&.__ 


'3 




Bia S ""131 M 


-'<*■ 


Lssfil&ZL 







BATHING, FISHING, HUNTING, TENNIS, Etc. 
Address THOMAS L. BELL, Felton P. O. 



HOTEL ROWARDENNAN 

Located in the Santa Cruz Mountains. 
9 miles from Santa Cruz. Round-Trip tickets 
from San Francisco, $3.00. 
Everything first-class. Over Ten Thousand 
Dollars spent in improvements this year. 
Headquarters for parties going into the Big 
Basin. Good livery. Competent drivers. 
Write for booklet to B. DICKINSON, Lessee, 

Ben Lomond, Cal. 

HOTEL EL MONTE Los Gatos, c a i. 

John Nevill, Proprietor. 
American Plan. Strictly first-class. 



HOLLY OAKS 

SAUSALITO, CAL. 

Rates from $10 
per week upward. 

MRS. M. A. FARRAR. 
Proprietor. 




28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1901. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC CO.--PACIFIC SYSTEM. 



TratnB leave and are due to arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 
[Main Line. Foot of Market St.] 



lkavk! 



Fkom July 14, 1901 



[arrive 



7:00 A Benlcla, Sulsun. Elmlra, and Sacramento 6:25 p 

7:00 A Vacaville, Winters, Rumsey 7:55 P 

7:30 a Martinez, San Ramon. Vallejo, Napa, Callstoga, Santa Rosa... 625p 

8:00 a Davis. Woodland. Knights Landine, Maryavllle.Orovllle 7:55 P 

8:00a Atlantic Express, Ogdenand East 12:25 p 

R:00 A Niles. Lathrop, Stockton 7:25 p 

8:00a Niles, Mendota. Hanford, Visalla. Portervllle 4:65* 

8:30 A l-hasta Express — Davis, Williams, (for Bartlett SprlngB), Wil- 
lows. Red Bluff. Portland - 7:55 P 

8:30 A San Jose. Llvermore, Stockton. lone, Sacramento. Placerville, 

Marysville, Chlco. Red Bluff. 4:25 P 

8:30 a Oakdale. Chinese (Yosemlte), Sonora. Carters 4:25 p 

9 00 A Haywards, Niles, and way stations 11:55 A 

9:00 a Vallejo 12:25 p 

9:00 A Los Angeles Express— Martinez. Tracy. Lathrop, Stockton, 

Merced. Fresno, and Los Angeles 7:25 p 

9:30 A Valleio, Martinez, and way stations 7:55 p 

10:00 a The Overland Limited— Oeden, Denver. Omaha, Chicago 6:55 p 

tl:00p Sacramento River Steamers t5:00 A 

3:30 p Haywards. NUes, and way stations 7:55 P 

4:00 r Benlcla, Winters. Sacramento, Woodland, Knights Landing, 

Mary«vtlle. Oroville 10:55 A 

4.00 p Martinez. San Ramon. Vallejo, Napa, Calistoga. Santa Rosa 9:25 a 

4:00 p NUes, Llvermore. Stockton, Lodi 12:25 p 

<30p Haywards, NUes, San Jose, Llvermore t855 A 

4:30 p Port Costa, Tracy. Lathrop. Stockton 10:25 A 

5:00 P The Owl Limited— Fresno, Tulare. Bakersfleld, Saugus for 

Santa Barbara, Los Angeles 8:55 A 

5:00p Martinez, Antioch, Stockton, Merced, Fresno 12:25 p 

5:00 p Yosemlte t 12 25 p 

530 p New Orleans Express — Mendota, Fresno, Bakersfleld, Los 

Angeles, Demlng. El Paso. New Orleans, and East 7:55 a 

6:00 p Haywards. Nile s. and San Jose „ 7:55 A 

t6:00p Vallejo 11:25 a 

6:00 p Oriental Mall— Ogden, Cheyenne, Omaha. Chicago 12:25 P 

6:00 p Oriental Mail— Ogden, Denver, St. Louis. Chicago 4:25 p 

7:00 p Oregon and California Express— Sacramento, Marysvllle, Red- 
ding. Portland, Puget Sound, and East 8:55 A 

8:05 P San Pablo, Port Costa, Martinez, and way stations 11:25 a 

18:05 p Valleio 7:55 P 



Coast Division (Narrow Gause). (Footof Market St.} 

I";45a Santa Cruz Excursion to Santa Cruz and principal way sta- 
tions 1^:05 p 

8:15 A Newark. Centerville. San Jose. Felton. Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz, and way stations 5:50 p 

t2:15 P Newark. Centerville. San Jose, New Altnaden, Felton. Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations 10:50 A 

4:15p Newark. San Jose. Los Gatos t8:50A 

C4:15 p Glenwood. Boulder Creek. Santa Cruz e3:50 A 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY 

From San Fbancisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— 17:15, 9:00, and 11:00 
A. M- 1 :00. 3 :00. 5 : 15, p. m. 

From Oaklanp — Foot of Broadway,— 16:00. J8:00, t8:05. 10:00 A. m. 12:00, 

2:00, 4:00 p.m. 

Coast Division {Broad Gauge). (Third and Townscnd streets.) 

6:10 a San Jose and way stations r>:-lO a 

T7K»0 a San JoBe and way stations t :30 P 

/7:00a New Al made n /i.lOP 

17:30 a Sunday Excursion for San Jose. Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, 

and principal way statious $8:30 P 

9:00 a San Jose. Hollister, Santa Cruz. Pacific Grove. Salinas, Ban 

LulsOblspo.Santa Barbara, and principal Intermediate stations 7:30 p 

10:30 A San Jose and way stations 630p 

11 : 30 A San Jose and wav Btatlons 5:30 p 

t2:45p San Mateo, Redwood. MenloPark, Palo Alto. Santa Clara.San 
Jose, Hollister, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, and Pacific 

Grove tl0:45 A 

8:30 P San Jose. Tres Pinos. Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove and way 

stations 4:l0p 

t4:15 p San Jose and principal way stations 9:45 a 

t5:00 p San Jose. Los Gatos, and principal way stations t9:00 A 

5:30 P San Jose and pilnclpal way stat'ons 8:36 a 

6:00 p Redwood, San Jose. Gilroy, Salinas, Santa Barbara, Los An- 
geles 10^5A 

6:30 p San Jose and wey stations 1*1:00 A 

all:45 f S an Jos e and wa y stations „ — 7 :30 p 

A for Morning. P for Afternoon. t Sundays excepted- 
J Sundays only. f Tuesdays and Fridays. a Saturdays only. 
g Monday. c Saturday and Sun day. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and other 
Information. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p. m., fo 

YOKOHAMA AND HONG KONG. 

calling at Kobe (Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hongkong 
with steamers for India, etc No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Friday. August 2, 1 901 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Tuesday, August 27, 1901 

Doric (via Honolulu) Friday, September 20. 1901 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Tuesday, October 15, 1901 

Rodni> Trip Tickets at Reduoed Rates. 
For freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street 
comer First. D. D. STTJBBS, Qeneial Manager. 



Santa Fc 
Route 



7:20 A. M. LOCAL FOR FRESNO. BAKERSFIELD. 
and Intermediate points. 9 a, m. California Limited, 
with Sleepers, Dining and Observation Cars to Kansas 
City and Chicago. 4:20 p.m. Local for Stockton. 8 p. m. 
Overland Express, with Palace and Tourist Sleepers and 
Chair Cars San Francisco to Chicago. 



Chicago in less than 3 Days 

From San Francisco At iO a. m. 

CHICAGO, UNION PACIFIC AND 

NORTH-WESTERN LINE 

Double Drawing-Rooui Sleeping Cars, Buffet, Smoking and 
Library Cars, with barber. Dining Cars — meals a la carte. Daily 
Tourist Car Service and Personally Conducted Excursions every 
week from San Francisco at 6 p. m. The best of everything. 
R. R. RITCHIE, General Agent Pacific Coast, 

617 Market St., Palace Hotel, San Francisco. 

C. A. NIURD0CK, PRINTERS*** 

Ne>. 532 CLAY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

CALIFORNIA NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY CO. 

LESSEE 

SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC R'Y CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tinrmos FEitny - Foot of Market Street 

WEEK DAYS-7:30, 9:00. 11:00 a.m.; 12:35. 3:30. 5:10, 6:30 p.m. Thursdays- 
Extra Trip at 1130 p.m. xaturdayB— Extra trips at 1:50 and 11 :30 P.M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00 9:30. 11:00 A.M.; 1:30, 3:30, 5:00, 6:20 P.M. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO 

WEEK DAYS— 6:10, 7*0, 9:20. 11:10 a.m.; 12:45. 3.10. 5:10 P.M. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1 :55 and 6:35 P.M. 
9UNDAY9-8:10.9:40 11:10 A.M.. 1:40. 3:40. 5:05. 6:25 P.M. 

Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule aa above. 



Leave San Francisco 


In Effect Nov. 7. 1900 


Arrive at San Francisco 


Week days 1 Sundays 
7:30 am 1 k:U0 am 
3:30 PM 9:30 AM 
5:10 PM 1 5:00 PM 


Destinations 

Novato 

Petaluma 

Santa Rosa 


Sundays ] Week days 
10:40 am I 8:40 am 

6105 PM 10:25 AM 
7:35 PM 1 6:22 PM 


7:30 am 

3:30 PM 


8:00 AM 


Fulton. Windsor. 

Healdsbure, Lytton, 

Geyservllie. Cloverdale 


| 10^5 AM 

7:35 pm 1 6:22 pm 


7:30 AM 


8:00 AM 


Hopland. TJklah 


7;35 PM 1 6:22 PM 


7:30 AM 1 S.00 AM 

8:30 PM 1 


Guerneville 


7 :35 pm I 10 :25 am 

| 6:22 PM 


730 AM 1 8:00 AM 
5:10 Pm 1 5:00 pm 


Sonoma 
Oien Ellen 


9:15 AM I 8:40 am 
6:05 PM 1 6:22 PM 


7:30 AM I 8:00 AM 
3:30 PM 1 5:00 I'M 


Sebastopol 


10:40 AM ] 10:25 AM 

7:35 pm 1 6:22 pm 



Stages L-onuect nt Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs and White Sulphur 
SpriDRp; at Fulton for Altruria; at Lytton for Lytton Springs; at Geyserville 
for Skaggs' Springs; at Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hopland for Duncan 
Springe. Highland Springs, Kelseyyille, Carlsbad Springs, Soda Bay. Lake- 
port, and Bartlett Springs; at TJkiah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga "Springs, 
Blue Likes, Lnnrel Del Lake, Witter Springs, Upper Lake, Porno, Potter 
Valley, John Day's, Riverside, Lierloy's. Bucknell'g, Sanhedrin Heights, 
Hullville. Booncville, Philo, CbriBtine Soda Springs, Navarro, Whitesboro, 
Albion, Little River. Orr's Springs. Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, Westport, 
TJsal Willits, Laytonville. Cummings, Bell's Springs, Harris, Olsens, Doyer, Scoria 
and Eureka. 

Salnrday-to- Monday Round Trip Tickets at redoced rates. On Sundays, Round 
Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 

TICKET OFFICE— G50 Market St., Chronicle Building. 
H. C. WHITING, Gen. Man. * R. X. RYAN. Gen. Pass. Agent. 

Pacific Coast Steamship CoJ 3teamer6leaveBroadwa y Wbarf 

r San Francisco. 

For Alaskan porta, 11 A.M.: July 5, ]0, 15, 20, 26, 30. 
Aug. 4; change to company's steamers at Seattle. 

For B. C- and Puget Sound Ports. 11 A. K.. July 5, 10, 
15, 20, 25, 30. Aug- 4, and every Bfth day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay), 1:30 p.m., July 1, 6, U, 16 
21. 26. 31. Aug 5, and every fifth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Santa Barbara. Port 
Los Angeles, Redondo (Los Angeles). Steamer "Santa Rosa." Sundays 
9 a.m.; steamer 'Corona." Wednesdays 9 a.m.. 

For Los Angeles, calling at Santa Cruz, Monterey. San Simeon, Cayucos. 
Port Harford (San Luis Ob spo), Oaviota. Santa Barbara. Ventura, Hue- 
neme. San Pedro. East San Pedro, and 'Newport (• Coos Bay only). 
Steamer "Coos Bay." Saturdays. 9 a.m.; Steamer " Bontta." Tuesdays, 

9 A.M. 

For Mexican Ports. 10 a.m.. 7th of each month. 
For further Information obtain Company's folder. 

The company reserves the right to change steamers, sailing dates, and 
hours of sailing, without previous notice. 
TICKET OFFICE— No, 4 New Montgomery street (Palace Hotel). 
G0ODALL. PERKINS & CO., Gen. Agts. 10 Market St . San Franolsco 

SS " Sierra," Thursday, Aug 1. 10 a. m . 

SS " Australia, "for Tahiti. Tiies., Aug 6. 10 B ,m. 

SS " Mariposa," Saturday. Aug 10. at 2 p. m. 

J ine to Coolgardie. Australia, and Capetown, 

South Africa, 

J. D, SPRECKELS & BROS. CO.. 
Agents, 643 Market Street. Freight Office, 327 
Market St., San Francisco, 



l|| 




Prlet ptr copy, 10 cenU. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, ISM. 

NEWS TiiETTER 

(£alif o r n i a XiVbnt i s c r. 



Annual Subscription, »4.00 




Volume LXIII. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 27, 1901. 



Number 4. 



Printed and published every Saturday by the proprietor. FRED 
MARRIOTT, V 3 Kearny slrtel, San Francisco. Knlered at San Fran- 
cisco I'ottotTice as second-dais matter. 

The office o[ the S. F. NEWS LETTER in London Eng., Is at SO Cornhlll 
E. C, London, England, (George Street A Co., Representatives), where 
Information may be obtained regarding subscriptions and advertising 
rates. Paris, France— Office. No. 87 Avenue de L'Opera. 

All social Items, announcements, advertising or other matter, intended for 
publication in the current number of the NEWS LETTER should be 
sent to this office not later than 6 p.m. Thursdny. 



Mrs. Nation has been sent to jail for thirty days, 
martyr now. 



She's a 



They hanged a nigger to a tree in West Virginia Monday. 
He was utterly lacking in gratitude. He didn't thank the 
mob for not skinning him alive and burning him at the stake. 



The Younger brothers, who have just been pardoned from 
prison, have gone to selling tomb-stones — articles for which 
they created such a demand a few years ago. 



Sven Johnsen, a Swede hailing from San Francisco, went 
crazy from the heat in New York, and jumped from a third- 
story window. He made it in one "yump." 



A union among the Auditor's clerks is the latest labor- 
saving device which, like its brethren, is designed solely to 
aid its members in doing less than they are paid for. 



Attorney Dudley Dubose arrived in Oakland from Nome 
on July 22d. This is not a hotel arrival, but if anybody 
wants to talk with Mr. Dubose he can find him in the Ala- 
meda County Jail. 



If the present infernal heat continues to rage in the 
East much longer, we will have to be getting out new geogra- 
phies and locating the torrid zone somewhere north of Ni- 
agara Falls. 



The fact that Sergeant Conboy is making nightly arrests 
among the opium smokers of Chinatown does not argue that 
opium smoking is becoming an extinct vice among the Celes- 
tials. 



Nearly five hundred teachers left this week for Manila. 
We suggest that a dozen or more of them be detailed to in- 
struct the editors of the Manila newspapers in English com- 
position. 



It is a tribute to The good sense of the members of the Ep- 
worth League that while on our coast they saw the expe- 
diency of ignoring the labor unions and letting the poor 
Chinaman alone. 



Are you a mathematician? If so, do not attempt to figure 
out the present city and State political mix-up. It would be 
Lafer to tackle the theory of perpetual motion or something 
comparatively easy. 



A' Paris doctor has discovered a process of making people 
taller by stretching the joints. Some of San Francisco's 
physicians are pretty good "stretchers," but they confine 
their operations to only one part of the anatomy — the leg. 



A motion was introduced in the Spanish Senate the other 
day to determine by inquiry who was to blame for the dis- 
asters to Spain in her late skirmish with Uncle Sam. There 
never has been the least question in this country as to who 
was responsible. 



Government authorities are considerably wrought up over 
the refusal of Agulnaldo to encourage his countrymen to 
surrender. It has taken a hundred years to reverse history. 
What was considered a virtue in Washington is now a vice 
in Agulnaldo. 



Truly, Providence protects the foolish. Captain Black- 
burn, who left Gloucester, Mass., in a twenty-flve foot sloop, 
thirty-eight days ago, has crossed the Atlantic, arriving 
safely at Lisbon. He and the man who is walking around 
the world will probably live long lives. 



The New York State Board of Charities has recommended 
that the Beilevue Hospital be torn down, the structure hav- 
ing of late, as all Californians know, furnished enough scan- 
dals to call down the wrath of heaven and save the State 
of New York the expense of demolition. 



Now that the case of Miss Margaret McKenzie has been 
settled by the Board of Education, the next problem is that 
of Mr. Ebenezer Knowlton. Unlike Miss McKenzie, Mr. 
Knowlton will not be tried for teaching too little, but for 
imparting to his pupils more than they had any right to 
know. 



Five years ago the town of Lincoln, New York, was estab- 
lished on Utopian principles, the city council being composed 
of women. Last week the town was sold under the hammer 
for $16,000. Considering the wild-eyed principles on which 
the town was founded, the only wonder is that it brought 
so much money at the end of five years. 



The good name of the State or the impression made on 
visitors doesn't seem to worry the strikers at all. The 
waiters chose the time of President McKinley's visit for their 
strike, and the teamsters made all the trouble possible 
while the Epworth Leaguers were here. A few more stunts 
like these, and people will be tumbling all over each other 
to keep away from California. 



The convicts of San Quentin are handing together into an 
association to help released prisoners to get on in the world. 
At first blush one might conclude that the bookkeeping de- 
partment of San Quentin would offer all the "lucrative em- 
ployment" which convicts might ask for, but such is not 
the case. The Ex-Convicts' Protective Association only asks 
for honest work. 



The remains of a pre-historic animal, the stegosaur, has 
been found in Colorado. It had the smallest brain of any 
creature that ever existed. A fitting place to find it, in Colo- 
rado, where Woman's Suffrage, Populism, and the W. C. T. 
TJ. reign, and where they muzzle cats to keep them from kill- 
ing birds. Probably stegosaurs would be found all over Kan- 
sas, the home of Carrie Nation and prohibition. 



Earl Russell has been convicted by the British House of 
Lords of bigamy. As a punishment for his crime, the Earl 
will be confined in Holloway prison for a few happy months. 
His cell will be palatial in proportions, will be furnished to 
the Earl's taste and supplied with books and a princely 
cuisine. He will also be allowed to see a convenient num- 
ber of boon companions daily. Truly a term of imprison- 
ment is a terrible thing when one is convicted by the House 
of Lords. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 27, 1901. 



SAMPSON AND SCHLEY. 

Admirals Sampson and Schley are both distinguished offi- 
cers of the United States navy, in whom the country very 
naturally and very properly takes great interest. It is 
indebted to both of them for really splendid service. Each 
has worked his way up to his present status, and both are 
worthy of all the honors or emoluments their country can 
confer upon them. With the knowledge that their country 
so feels both men ought to rest satisfied. They together, 
with equal bravery, fought the common enemy, and if they 
are now to turn and fight each other, the sight will be odious 
in the eyes of the country. Both admirals are all right in 
themselves. Lett alone to their own courses, they would be 
the best of friends, as brave fellow-officers ought to be. 
The trouble-making and mischief-brewing all comes from 
super-serviceable advisors, some of whom, with shame and 
confusion of face be it said, occupy high official stations. 
Men highly paid to give their best services to the country 
are not doing that when they occupy themselves in demoral- 
izing and paralyzing the country's right arm, which its 
navy is. When the names of these busy-bodies are known 
throughout the country, as it now seems they will, it is not 
difficult to predict that they will be abhorred, as they de- 
serve to be. Mischief-makers are detestable wherever found 
and should be given no quarter among officers and gentle- 
men. When the Spanish fleet was crushed one of our officers 
congratulated Schley upon having "the luck" to be in com- 
mand. "Oh," said the Admiral, "never mind that. There is 
glory enough in this for all of us." That was the right 
spirit, and worthy of an American sailor. It was simply 
"the fortune of war" that Schley and not Sampson was in 
command, and to that fortune every professional soldier and 
sailor bows in submission, because it is useless to do 
anything else. Schley could not have fought that battle 
as he did if Sampson had not placed his ships where they 
were, and if Sampson was not present to fight with those 
ships, it was only because duty had called him elsewhere. 
Honors are easy between them, and the matter ought to 
rest at that. 



LRIGHT PROSPECTS OF THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. 

There is quite a boom on in Australian affairs just now. 
The opening of its first National Parliament by King Ed- 
ward's heir apparent has been made the occasion of an 
amount of free advertising such as is seldom accorded to 
any country. The great dailies, the illustrated papers, and 
the magazines from everywhere have vied with each other 
in setting forth at length the bright prospects of the new 
commonwealth. There is reason for all this. It has just 
dawned upon the commercial world that Australians are, 
per capita, the richest people in the world, and by far the 
largest buyers, in proportion to population, of foreign manu- 
factures. There is a present and prospective business in 
that quarter well worth looking after. Hence the motive for 
much of the free advertising. The figures are surprising 
readers everywhere, except in England. That country has 
had "a soft snap" in her Antipodean colonies ever since the 
discovery of gold there, and now her commercial rivals are 
in hot haste to snatch away from her that which she has 
been at so much pains to build up. There are no discrimin- 
ating tariffs in Australia to combat, and no prejudices 
against trading with foreigners who will buy at the highest 
and sell at the cheapest. Her industrial views are not at 
all American. In the staples for which her climate and soil 
are peculiarly fitted, she can defy the competition of the 
world, and with those staples she appears, for the present, 
to be content. She thii.ks it — silly young jade that she is — 
unwise to engage in less profitable occupations than her 
most profitable ones. She does not care, for instance, to go 
into the world's carrying trade at a loss, while she has more 
industries than she can attend to that are highly profitable. 
Her money is too productive to be wasted on ship subsidies. 
Last year the exports of the six colonies, now forming one 
commonwealth, amounted to $380,000,000, and the imports 
to $320,000,000, which leaves a balance which is proportion- 
ately larger than our own. Containing a population of four 
millions, her foreign commerce amounts to $170 per capita. 
That of the United States is less than $30 per capita. No 



other people in the world, except their New Zealand neigh- 
bors, can show anything like so large a volume of trade in 
proportion to their numbers. 

At present most of the trade is confined within the limits 
oi the British Empire, and last year England exported more 
to Australia than to any other country in the world, except 
the Unitea States. Yet during that year our exports to and 
imports from Australia amounted to one-third of those from 
England. We are cutting into that trade without much effort, 
and might easily do better, if we did our best. It may 
be asked: "Where do this hanaful of people get so much 
money from?" In the first place, it must be remembered 
that they occupy a continent, mostly of rolling prairies, as 
large as the United States, without Alaska. They have one 
hundred million sheep on those prairies, producing wool 
so long and so fine that no other country can compete with 
it. Her cattle fatten on boundless plains, and the problem 
oi great cold-storage steamers has been solved. Australia 
now feeds Asia, Africa, and, with some assistance from the 
United States, both England and Europe, with the tenderest 
of roast beef, the sweetest of Southdown mutton, and the 
best of butter. In 1899 Australia led this country in the 
production of gold, which condition was, however, reversed 
last year. Australia has coal deposits on all sides of her 
continent that are not less in area than those of the United 
States, and she has almost a monopoly of the trade of the 
Pacific in that mineral. Her silver, tin, copper, and lead 
mines are only surpassed in this country. Imagine all these 
good things to be owned by only four millions of people, and 
then it is easy to tell where their money comes from. . It 
is well for us that we got a hundred years' start of our 
friends in this sunny southland. 



LOCAL REPUBLICAN POLITICS. 

The turning out of the present Municipal Administration 
in November next, and the capturing of the offices for the 
"workers," appear to be burning questions at present with 
the self-constituted leaders of the Republicans. The State 
Central Committee has "recognized" the Tilden County Com- 
mittee, controlled by Colonel Burns and his friends, whereat 
the two newspaper bosses are as mad as March hares. It 
seems that there is to be a regular, old-fashioned standup 
fight between the Bosses that are and the Bosses that would 
be. The reasons why one should be preferred to the other 
do not appear. Just what the difference is in the moral 
stamina of the two wings is not clearly set forth. That 
neither likes the new charter or civil service appointees, 
or police independence, or a non-partisan election board, or 
economy, retrenchment and reform, is, of course, to be taken 
for granted by the records that they have made. If the two 
newspapers would only devote as much space to setting forth 
the good things that they propose to advocate and do for this 
municipality, as they do to abusing their rivals, the electorate 
would have a better opportunity of judging between them. 
They both tried their level best to defeat the charter before 
the people. Do they now seek power in order to defeat its 
operation by maladministration? Do they propose to give 
us cleaner and better commissions; if so, where are fhey 
going to find them? Is it true, or not, that they think they 
have found a loophole in the civil service section of the 
charter by which they expect to make a clean sweep of the 
present office-holders? Whether they have or not, it is cer- 
tain that many of their present supporters have been made 
to believe they have. It is not a good motive with which to 
inspire workers. It bodes only ill to the municipality. The 
tax-payers are not worrying themselves to learn if the old 
Bosses are bad; they know all about that. What they are 
more concerned in learning is whether there exists any 
reasonable hope that the new Bosses will be better. They 
are curious to learn what marvelous compact has brought 
two such dire enemies together and enabled them to act as 
one. It cannot be distrust of Burns, or Kelly, or Crimmins. 
for they have both, at one time or another, employed those 
distinguished individuals in the most confidential capacities. 
Government by newspapers has never succeeded anywhere. 
It is their nature to cultivate hatreds and jealousies, and no- 
body wants to be governed by malice and all uncharltable- 
ness. 



July 27. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE SPRING VALLEY RAID. 
In pursuing a course whl> h tins obll] ing Valley 

Water Co m pany to reaort to the law In ord 

property rights from partial confiscation, the Board of 
• isors baa done that which la calculated '■■ oris 
Dto disrepute among thai desirable clans ol • 

urns enterprises which the 
ipment of cmr Oriental trade has opened a 
Held for. Men with money to invest (and that is the kind 
of people the rity needs at this jiineturei will naturally 
look askance at a community whose governing bod; endeav- 
ors, without reason, to cinch capital and whose local courts 
or to remain Inactive while the wrong is being con- 
summated. It is customary to justify such a raid as has 
been made upon the Spring Valley Company with the dema- 
gogic implications that are supposed to arise out of the 
statement that the company is "a rich corporation" and 
enjoys a monopoly of its business. As a matter of fact the 
Spring Valley Water Company is an incorporated association 
of stockholders, many of whom are widows, orphans, the ben- 
eficiaries of small trust estates, and other persons of limited 
means who are relying upon a revenue from their invest- 
ment for the means of life. From the standpoint of sym- 
pathetic sentiment this demagogic argument falls dead of 
Its owa weight. And when the more business-like arguments 
by which this raid on the water company is supported are 
examined in the light of reason they prove to be irrational 
and absurd. For instance, one of our daily papers has sought 
to make a point of the fact that while the company has 
sought to have rates fixed at figures which would enable it 
to pay dividends at the rate of seven per centum its books 
showed that it was able to borrow money at four per centum. 
This is ridiculous. No comparison can be made between the 
two cases. When the Spring Valley Water Company bor- 
rows money it borrows upon gilt-edged security. The lender 
takes no risks. When his interest and principal are due he 
has notning to do but collect. Upon the other hand a man 
who buys Spring Valley stock takes all the chances of a 
business enterprise just as he would if he bought stock in a 
bank or an insurance company. A dam may burst and swamp 
all his dividends for two years. Seven per centum is not, 
therefore, an unreasonable dividend to ask. But the truth 
is that the Supervisors were not actuated by any desire to 
be just between the consumers and the company. They were 
manifestly actuated by a desire to cinch the company. 
'ihis is shown by the fact that in placing a value upon 
its property for the purpose of fixing rates, they ignored the 
amount which the franchise of the company was assessed at 
and on which, viz., $5,000,000, the company paid taxes. 
Tnis circumstance demonstrates that the Supervisors were 
very unjust, to say tne least. 



LABOR ORGANIZED INTO A GREAT TRUST. 
If the labor unions succeed in their present designs they 
will have organized a trust more powerful than all the other 
trusts combined. When all labor is once "unionized," and 
that is what is now being attempted, all industrial enter- 
prise will be at its mercy. It cannot be too distinctly under- 
stood that the strikes now springing up all over the country 
are based, not on rates of wages or hours of labor, but on 
the demand that none but members of unions shall be given 
employment. That is the conceded case of the Machinist 
Federation. Its members are for the present satisfied with 
the conditions of their employment, as they have for some 
time past existed, but they want employers to unionize the 
many mills in which non-union men prefer to work. Failing 
in that demand, they have gone out on strike in the hope of 
forcing the employers to submit. Sympathizing with all 
efforts based on reason to improve the condition of all sons 
of toil, as we nearly ail are, we do not believe that in the 
end it will be to the benefit of workers to make themselves 
slaves of demagogic leaders and liable to be "called out" 
at any moment, thereby paralyzing the very enterprises by 
which they live. Nor do we believe n. to be consistent with 
the rights of man to prevent him working for whom he 
pleases and for what he pleases without being subjected to 
the tyranny of being compelled to join an uncongenial union. 
The unions are practically all one, and they will be really 
and openly so before long. They are federated, hold joint 



pool their fundi", and InsUtnte "aytnpal 
"trial \r TRD8 which 

Utile tra inolr Inelfi 

ill Ill- 
all the unions, and there « ill bi 

Dl towards 
lion ol labor, and ■ I monopoly 

more gigantic than the world has so far v. other 

things will follow. The unions will i 
own their supply stores, and then communistic aodallan 
will be here. Bui the workshops of the country are not 
unionised yet if the strikes succeed they will be; if they 

fall, steps must be taken to prevent a racurrenci of like 
p< ril. 



FISH AND GAME LAWS. 

Considerable discussion has been caused lately among 
pent snien over the acquittal a< San Jose of an ignorant Ital- 
ian who had shot nesting quail. Ignorance of the law was 
his plea, and on that he was acquitted. While a bad exam- 
ple was set. the incident served to call more attention to the 
condition of our game laws and the laxity of their enforce- 
ment in many quarters than a conviction would have done, 
had a fine been imposed nothing more would have been 
heard of the matter. As it is. much has been written about 
the ease, and there has been stirred up a feeling that will 
in the future tend to awaken vigilance in those who have 
the care of game and fish and are authorized to protect them 
from poachers. This coast has been a sportsman's paradise, 
and can be made so again. Conditions are fairly good now, 
but could be made better by more watchfulness. There is 
a prejudice against game laws, and in country districts a 
violation of them is looked upon with leniency. In many 
places the people who come from the cities in search of 
sport are regarded with animosity. This is a short-sighted 
view to take. The preservation of game means money for 
the country residents. Metropolitans who go out in search 
of quail, deer or trout are willing to pay hard cash for their 
sport, and the country people are the ones who get it. The 
"industry" — if it may be so called — of entertaining city 
people is developing year by year in the rural districts, 
and it behooves the people who live there to see that game 
is taken care of. There is far more money in entertaining 
city visitors than there is in selling quail, trout or deer. 
California affords glorious opportunities for the hunter 
or fisherman. But if game and fish are killed recklessly and 
indiscriminately, it will not be long until the hills and val- 
leys are depopulated of the feathered, furred and finny deni- 
zens that offer such attractions to true lovers of true sport. 



A DEMAND FOR RIGHTS. 

As much as is involved in the contest of Mrs. Clara 
Kluge-Sutro against the Sutro estate, less has been said 
about it than any similar case in San Francisco. For a long 
time Mrs. Kluge-Sutro, through her attorney, tried to effect 
a quiet compromise with the Sutro heirs, as she had no 
desire for the publicity and notoriety of a court trial. It was 
thought for a while that the heirs would act rightly by her. 
but as they could not agree among themselves, Judge Pat- 
terson, attorney for Mrs. Kluge-Sutro, demanded an im- 
mediate trial. Mrs. Kluge-Sutro's children are of the 
same flesh and blood as those who are trying to keep 
tnem away from their own, and are certainly entitled to a 
share of the millions left by Ex-Mayor Sutro. The future 
welfare of her children is all that impels Mrs. Kluge-Sutro 
to bring this case to a trial, and she has determined to fight 
the case to the bitter end. 

The number and status of Mrs. Kluge-Sutro's witnesses 
indicate that the defendants will not have things all their 
own way when the case comes up for trial on August 15th, 
to prove that she was the legal wife of Mr. Adolph Sutro. 
The trial will probably occupy a month, but, with a fair 
representation of the case there should be but one verdict — 
a verdict for Mrs. Kluge-Sutro and her children. 



Miss May Hoffman has telegraphed to a San Francisco 
friend that she is to be married. She didn't say to whom — 
but Rev. J. Le Baron Johnson is a likely candidate. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 27, 1901. 



UNCLE SAM'S BAD BOYS. 

Ex-Governor and present Senator, Dietrich of Nebraska, 
announces that he will introduce a bill at the next session o£ 
Congress for a national control of prisons, an extension of 
the parole system, and for the employment of convict labor 
in the reclamation of the arid lands of the West. The Sena- 
tor intends to devote himself to developing a great and uni- 
form system of reformatory and deterrent treatment of 
criminals throughout the United States. He appears to 
think that he is called to the special work, and perhaps he 
is, for he talks like one who has the earnestness of his con- 
victions. If the Constitution permits of the nationalizing 
of our prisons, and on that point he has fortified himself 
with the favorable opinions of eminent lawyers, his measure 
will be in the main for good, and more will be accomplished 
for the economics of the nation than is possible under the 
present lack of system. Penologists agree as to the need 
of unification in the methods which obtain In the various 
prisons and penitentiaries of the country. In many of them 
intelligent direction is greatly hampered, if not rendered im- 
possible, by obsolete buildings and absence of sanitation. 
There are already national prisons, like that at Fort Leaven- 
worth, where Government control is direct. The buildings 
are Government property, they are officered by men respon- 
sible only to the Federal authorities, and they are occupied 
by violators of federal laws, such as smugglers, moonshiners, 
mail robbers, soldiers and sailors, who have been sentenced 
by courts martial, counterfeiters, and the like, and these men 
do effective work in farming, road-making, and building. 
It is not likely that Senator Dietrich contemplates the entire 
abolition of State prisons. Men guilty of slight infractions 
of the law and sentenced to short terms, can be satisfactor- 
ily treated in their own States. For long term men, however, 
systematic work should be provided. They can build reser- 
voirs and irrigating canals in a region now desert, but cap- 
able, under proper conditions, of supporting populations of 
hundreds of millions. It is extremely difficult in the older 
States to provide work for prisoners. Labor leaders manage 
to prevent their being employed in productive work. Be- 
sides, imprisonment without work is a barbarism. The men, 
having nothing to do but idle in their cells, eat their hearts 
out planning revenges, deteriorating in body and mind, and 
return to society worse than when they left it. Senator Die- 
trich has taken hold of a big subject. His handling of it will 
be watched with interest. 



is led into saying contradictory things, and then the jury 
and the public are told that he is not to be believed. There, 
are lawyers in this State who hold themselves out to be em- 
ployed because of their capacity to indulge in the sort of 
thing to which we are alluding. It is well that such lawyers 
should be made to understand that they are laying the foun- 
dation for the defeat of their clients before the Supreme 
Court. 



THE RIGHTS OF WITNESSES. 

The Appellate Division of the Supreme Court of New York 
has set aside the verdict of a jury on the ground that the de- 
fendant was so grossly abused by the opposing counsel 
that the jury could hardly have failed to be prejudiced 
thereby. Said the Appellate Judge: "Witnesses have some 
lights that courts are bound to respect. Attacks of the 
kind set out in this record cannot be made on one's private 
life under the guise of cross-examination. Their purpose 
is either to coerce the party into a settlement or else 
to unduly and unjustly prejudice the jury against him. Such 
examinations tend to bring the administration of the law 
and a trial of action into disrepute, and to lessen the respect 
which litigants have for the courts." The court goes on to 
hold that the asking of the questions in the record was 
improper, and "the action of the trial judge in compelling 
the defendant to answer them was highly improper and war- 
ranted the setting aside of the verdict." When shall we get 
a clear-cut, resounding opinion like that from the Supreme 
Court of California? Probably in no State in the Union are 
the so-called "privileges of the bar" so outrageously 
abused as they are right here. The abuse of witnesses 
by cross-examiners and the failure of the judges to protect 
them is one of the gravest scandals in the administration of 
justice in this community. No witness is safe from attack. 
Insinuation and inuendo are used by the lawyers to destroy 
the credibility of opposing witnesses. And as if that were 
not enough, they have been known to bribe the reporters, 
who in too many cases are the official stenographers, to 
spread their unbearable abuse before the community. They 
have no respect for anybody or anything. They will attempt 
to besmirch the virtue of a chaste woman if it serves their 
purpose, and they will browbeat honest men until in the an- 
ger and excitement of the moment the outraged witness 



THE TUBERCULOSIS CONGRESS MEETS. 
The medical profession throughout the civilized world 
has been exercised for some time past over the assembling 
of the Tuberculosis Congress which has been holding its 
sessions in London during the present week. The occasion 
has been awaited with great expectations. It was known 
that scientific men all over the world have during the past 
two or three years been focusing their attention upon this 
scourge to humanity as never before. From time to time 
hints were given out that the investigators were making 
remarkable discoveries and that a cure for consumption 
was within easy sight. It was even intimated that the dread 
disease would be stamped out ultimately and lose its ter- 
rors for mankind. It is little wonder, therefore, that the 
eyes of civilization have been turned towards London, and 
that the leading medical experts of the world have made 
pilgrimages thither as if it were the coming Mecca of sal- 
vation for mankind. Until the reports of the transactions 
of the Congress are to hand, it will not be possible to say 
with any degree of accuracy just what has been accom- 
plished. The press despatches are lengthy, but very un- 
satisfying. They are enough, however, to show the great 
interest taken in the proceedings, and to give an idea of 
the standing of the men wrestling with the great problem 
in hand. The renowned Professor Koch of Germany was 
very naturally and properly called upon to lead off with the 
first paper. No man alive has done more than he to create 
lively expectations as to new and great discoveries in this 
connection. If the telegraphed report does not omit its sa- 
lient points it must be confessed that his paper is exceeding- 
ly disappointing. It does not deal with the treatment of con- 
sumption at all, much less does it indicate how, in any stage, 
it is to be cured. He tells us how it may be prevented, but 
nothing more. Isolate all infected patients, as they do the 
lepers on Molokai, and soon the disease will die out for want 
of replenishment. Marvelous discovery! We had thought 
that every tyro of the profession knew that already. The 
professor deals with two other points. He says that con- 
sumption is not hereditary, and in that view the profession 
has long been agreed. He further declares that tuberculosis 
in cows is not transmittable to human beings, but admits 
that he cannot prove his thesis, because of the difficulty of 
innoculating a man. His view is strongly controverted, 
and for the present it must remain among the many things 
"not proven." What is already known about consumption 
is that, if taken in its early stages, it is surely curable; 
that it is not hereditary, and that it ought to be treated 
in isolated sanitariums. If the London congress can tell 
us no more than this, it will have met to little purpose. 



JUSTICE AT LAST. 

After years of wearisome litigation and of attempts to 
frustrate justice the Fair heirs have very nearl" come into 
their own. The trust clause, which has been so long a 
matter of dispute, has been set aside at last, and nearly all 
the property is now in the hands of the rightful owners. 
Judge Troutt has rendered a decision to the effect that, the 
Supreme Court having declared void the trust clause as to 
the realty in the Fair will, the whole will fell, and that 
the heirs are entitled to receive the property in the ordinary 
course of the law. 

When the Supreme Court decided that the trust clause was 
invalid, the executors of the estate turned over the real 
property, but refused to deliver up the personal property, 
which amounted to $7,000,000, holding that only the real 
property was included in the decision. 

By Judge Troutt's decision about $5,000,000 In personal 
property was distributed, a reservation having been made by 
stipulation of $2,000,000 on account of Mrs. Craven's claim 
that she is the widow of the late Senator Fair. If her case 
is decided against her — as it surely must be — there will be 
$2,000,000 more to be distributed. 



July 27, 1901. SAN FRANCISCO 

Bubbles From the Swim 



By Lady Algy. 



The hoodoo bird certainly has a penchant for those bap 
tiled 'Jenny." He has roosted on Miss Jennie Flood ami Mi.-s 
Jenny Blair, and hooted at tho efforts of Dan Cupid bo 
straighten out their heart affairs. They have both traveled 
along a lover's lane without a turning — a lane that leads not 
to the altar. And now poor Miss Jenny Dunphy is taking her 
double dose of misfortune. For years she and Mr. Bob 
Grayson toiled over the hummocks that beset their path of 
true love. When they had adjusted their different religious 
beliefs, overcome parental objections, and what not, Mr. 
Grayson's lamentable death occurred. 

A strange fatality seems to have choken the love affairs 
of these three Jennys. Wealth is evidently not a short cut 
to matrimonial happiness. It is no secret that Miss Jenny 
Flood could not, or would not, marry the man of her choice, 
and has lived a life of lonely spinsterhood rather than efface 
the memory of her first and only attachment. Miss Jenny 
blair is likewise the victim of an affection that, whether it 
be requited or no, is too tangled to be easily unraveled. Miss 
Blair interests herself in all sorts of things — takes plenty of 
mental and physical exercise, the only mucilage that will 
piece together a splintered heart. But neither Miss Jenny 
Flood, Miss Jenny Blair nor Miss Jenny Dunphy can ever 
know the deeps of happiness. It is left for little Jenny 
Crocker to prove that there is nothing in a name. 

* • * 

The Duvals, with their wonderful baby, will not be with 
us until January. There is only one baby in the world worth 
mentioning, but fortunately every mother has him. If the 
Duval baby half lives up to the photograph his proud grand- 
mamma Tobin is displaying, he is indeed a beauty. 

Mr. Raoul Duval has stayed the necessary length of time 
in France — he is still in the French army — so they are now 
tree to jaunt whither they will and are at present tarrying in 
the "right little, tight little island." Mr. Duval has full 
share of the Frenchman's talent for pretty speeches, and he 
has an eye that is not glued to his own fireside. But while 
he may express admiration for many there is no doubt that 
his charming wife is sole tenant of his heart. Her letters 
fairly leak happiness. 

* * * 

It is a settled fact that Mr. Peter Martin and his bride are 
to make this their permanent home, seasoned with two or 
three months in New York and Newport. The plain truth 
of the matter is that Mr. Peter Martin could not afford to 
keep his wife in New York in the style which her position 
would demand. When Peter asked Mr. Charles Oelrichs 
for his daughter, that practical father at once demanded 
what his income was. Herman Oelrichs had already as- 
sured them that the Martin wealth was only carfare com- 
pared to the New York standard. Peter made truthful 
leply, and Mr. Oelrichs pere exclaimed, "That'll just about 
. pay for my daughter's gowns." While gowns are sometimes 
called delicious, I have never heard of their being good to 
eat — much less to drink, and fancy poor Peter regaling him- 
self on nothing else. But Miss Lily has a will of her own, 
and declared that she could, and would manage to get 
along on $2,000 a month — which is Peter's income. The 
young couple will save enough on dinner invitations the first 
year to insure three meals a day for some time thereafter. 
Miss Oelrichs is very tall, and she is not as wafer-like as 
most girls of the period. She is much plumper than our 
own aspirants for fashionable leaders. With her advent 
bones may go below par. 

* * » 

Since the Scott wedding the breach between the Irving 
and Henry Scotts has widened leagues. Poor Miss Caro 
Crockett is between the devil and the deep sea, trying to 
keep on the thin strip of neutral ground. The Crocketts and 
henry Scotts have been most intimate friends, and Caro 
and Mary heart-to-heart companions. Now that Caro is 
engaged to Lawrence, only son of the Irving Scott household, 
she must of course clasp hands with them without getting 
out of touch with the other faction. It's a delicate and not 
overly enjoyable position. 

From Paris comes the rumor of the engagement of one of 



NEWS LETTER. 

tho granddaughters of our sugar king to a real lire prince, 
me girl Is still In bar teens, and has been abroad with her 
mother for OTW a year. Should the report prove true, tho 
daughter of the flour man will have to enure the tltlo with 
the sugar princess. Prince Poniatowskl, unllko most Im- 
I husbands, has financed his wife's fortune very euc- 
my. However, I don't fancy the rumored engagement 
will be relished by the family of the young la.lv who plays 
leading role. Despite the business talents which the one 
prince in our midst has shown, I think her grandfather will 
shy at the title. 



Valuable 

Papers 

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their safe-keeping at $5 
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CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT 
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L. CAHEN & SON, Agents, Wholesale Liquer Dealers, 

Send tor Pamphle 418 Sacramento Street, 

WM. WILLIAMS & SONS 

(LID.) OF AEIEDEIN. 



ScotchJWhisky 

Importers - MACONDRAY A CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 27, 1901. 




Pleasured 

Wand 



GJeohey 



qr no wand butPlt&sure 's / 



"Garrett O'Magh," by "Augustus Pitou, Manager," as pre- 
sented at tue Columbia Theatre by Chauneey Olcott, is one 
of the prettiest and best dressed comedies that has come 
our way in a long time. It you are thinking that this play 
is like other stereotyped Irish farces, in which there is a 
mortgage on the old home, with melodramatic concomitants, 
undeceive yourself. We have instead of these wearisome 
features, the Irish aristocracy of a century ago, enjoying all 
the amenities of culture and wealth. The equipment of the 
stage is a delight, and the well-painted scenery shows care 
and skill. As for the costumes, they are not only pictur- 
esque, as the period insures that they must be, but are 
faithful in the minutae and impeccable in fashion and 
fabric. They take one back to the days when Pierce Eagan 
created Tom and Jerry, and we see in the gallant O'Magh 
and the rest living models from which Robert Cruikshank 
might have made his illustrations for "Life in London." 
1 see from the programme, by the way, that the wardrobe 
of the company was designed by Mr. H. A. Ogden, a clever 
draughtsman who, in recent years, has devoted himself 
to the planning of historical costumes for the theatre, with 
a success that entitles him to pre-eminence. 
* * * 

"Garrett O'Magh" is not only refreshing, but it is con- . 
sistently constructed, and can stand as a clever play without 
depending upon the Irish interest that gives it being and 
support, and quite independent of the musical element that 
is introduced in Olcott's songs. One seldom sees a better 
bit of comedy than the scene in the second act, when Gar- 
rett coaches Rufus Hardy in his love making from behind 
a screen. The humor is real, the acting adroit, and the 
laughter it evokes is genuine and sane. I add the latter ad- 
jective because we hear a great deal of genuine laughter at 
the theatres that is not the expression of a discriminating 
sense of humor. The public laughs at things that are 
silly without being humorous, and its appetite for banal fun 
is catered to by playwrights and actors in a way that is dis- 
gusting. Let us be grateful, therefore, that in "Garrett O' 
Magh" we are never thus offended. There are here and 
there some catchpenny sentiments, but Olcott manages them 
with a modesty that satisfies the gallery without rasping 
the rest of us. The play is wholesome without being homely, 
a rare distinction nowadays. It is, at the same time, real 
and romantic, with its abundance of local color, which of 
course is green, and an interest of other days in the elope- 
ment of the hero and heroine, who find their Gretna Green 
in a roadside inn, where they come upon an Irish festivity 
in full blast. If I were to look for a hinge to hang a criticism 
on I would say that the tableau at tne end of the third act 
is prettier than it is rational, but it finds its forgiveness in 
its effect, and further, in the fact that tricks of the kind 
are pleasantly scarce in the play under consideration. 

"Garrett O'Magh" belongs to a class of refined plays, and 
is better than most of its kind. It is infinitely superior, for 
example, to "Because She Loved Him So." 

■■■ ■-:■ ■: 

But I am neglecting the player for the play. Olcott has 
much more than a good voice and a knack for song, his 
personality is winning, and he has a truly fine comedy sense, 
which would carry him through if he did not sing a note] 
He has a boyish speaking voice, and a boyish, buoyant tem- 
perament that is irresistible. His enthusiasm is infectuous 
and his amatory skill delicately convincing. If there is any- 
one on the stage since Alexander Salvini died who can make 
love better than Mr. Chauneey Olcott I do not know his 
name. He has an exceptional grace of manner and bearing 
and his singing is peculiarly pleasant. His voice is small" 
with a white rift in it, and of a pure lyric quality. He has 
the gift of sympathy, and added to it a nice taste in phras- 
ing. The company has been so judiciously selected that we 
find all the parts more than acceptably done. Miss Edith 



Barker is winsome and Mr. Paul Everton displays a distinct 
ability. The rest are too numerous to mention, but I am 
glad to oe able to include them all in a general commenda- 
tion. 

::■ '■:■ -:■ 

Blanche Bates' performance of Hedda Gabler in msen s 
frenetic play of the name is an old story; but it is not too 
late to record the fact that her acting was brilliant and 
aroused an immense enthusiasm, which has left its thrill 
with every one who saw the play. She has enlarged her 
scope since she did Hedda a twelve month ago, and her pres- 
ent performance is a notable one. It may be said with truth 
that she lacks something of insight, that from a strictly 
philosophic view the fullness of Ibsen's purpose in creating 
the character is not attained; but therein lies the chief ob- 
stacle to an adequate interpretation of any of the more im- 
portant personages in his dramas. It is a matter of over- 
doing or underdoing, both of which faults arise from the 
insecure grasp that the player has of the author's absolute 
meaning. How Miss Bates would or will approach the char- 
acter of Laura in "When We Dead Awaken," is matter for 
doubt and speculation. For my part I have no desire to see 
this vagary of Ibsen's produced on the stage. In it he has 
carried morbid analysis and symbolism to irrational ex- 
tremes, but I understand that Miss Bates is anxious to give 
it. It should prove an immense go with fad-struck females. 
Some time ago Miss Bates said in an interview that she was 
working hard at her profession and availing herself of every 
opportunity to act in Ibsen. I question the wisdom of her 
ambition, but if it will lead her away from the Cigarette 
habit I shall rejoice. She owes herself something better. 
,If we look into the future and see Blanche Bates among 
the great ones of the stage, does it not seem a pity that at 
the age of — well, I shall not insist upon that — she should be 
with Mrs. Carter a co-puppet of Mr. David Belasco? It is 
not a matter that Edwin Booth should be ashamed of that 
he made his first appearance as Tressel in "Richard III.," 
nor might his father hide the fact that he first trod the 
stage as Campillo in "The Honeymoon." Ellen Terry, I be- 
lieve, made her earliest essays as Manmillius in "The Win- 
ter's Tale" and Prince Arthur in "King John." Even our 
own Henry Miller took his first bath in the calcium as the 
wounded sergeant in "Macbeth." Well and good. These 
and otners served in minor roles what the actor calls an 
"apprenticeship," but unless she rebels, Blanche Bates will 
have to look back to the time when she squandered her soul 
and sinew on carpenter drama at a period when her mature 
talent should have lifted her above such abuses of dramatic 
art. 

• » • 

When Mr. Augustin Daly revamped and Bowdlerized 
Wyeherley s "The Country Wife" for Ada Rehan he did not 
improve it. The play, despite its classic flavor, is of no es- 
sential merit, but under the touch of the wily adapter it 
served as a vehicle for one of Miss Rehan's clever por- 
trayals of quaintly juvenile character. Those who saw her 
at the old Bush-Street Theatre will remember her coy and 
womanly treatment of the part, which she invested with 
a peculiarly fascinating manner that was comic only by 
suggestion, but richly so at that. Miss Roberts, who has 
made "The Country Girl" a part of her repertory, slights the 
opportunities of the part, prefering evidently to do it as 
Lydia Yeamens-Titus might; that is, she buffoons it indus- 
triously. The performance is not without amusement, nor 
is Miss Roberts without a clever comedy touch here and 
there, it is her conception that I have to quarrel with, and 
indeed the spirit of extravagance that pervades the whole 
production. The play can be merry without being overdone 
in the slapdash manner that the Alcazar stock people as- 
sume for the English and French farces they serve us with 
so often. Brisk comedy without obvious effort requires more 
art that is possessed by Miss Roberts and her company, with 
the exception, I grant, of Mr._ White Whittlesey, who, when 
he is not involved with the rest in their artificial ways, 
is artistic and dependable. Mr. Lucius Henderson gives the 
character of Sparkish salience, but what merit he has is 
clouded in the most patent play-acting. Mr. George Web- 
ster begins carefully, but becomes very loose later on. There 
is little humor in his Bluebeard mouthings. 



July 27. 1901. 



SAN FRANCI9CO NEWS LETTER. 



I ■■mil- opera company at the Tlvoll Is taking Its leavo 
wiih .« MVlva] of the Toy Maker." It may \- 

I of this opera, that It will be an annu 
ture of the Tlvoll s It will serve Its pa 

as a stop gap as well anil better than some of the things 
that have known man ns. There are nnv.lty 

and color In the toyshop scene, which In Itself Is sufflc dentl) 
picturesque to carry the performance. It is worth aoetng 
for Its originality. Annie Meyers, as the doll, has made ■ 
surprising hit. or perhaps 1 should not say surprising, for 
her ■TOteaqm gyrations and spasmodic vocalization are 
I lever and amusing. Ferris Hartman puts humor into and 
gets humor out of the part of the Toy Maker, and his per 
formance will leave a good impression against his return 
after the grand opera season. 

• • • 

Variety holds forth at the Orpheum as usual, with the 
usual bumper houses. Mr. Will H. Murphy and Blanche 
Nichotls are amusing in a climacteric farce. Mr. Ed Rev 
nard Is a foxy ventriloquist with ability, and sufficient 
novelty to make a time-worn stunt interesting. His automa- 
tons are cleverly contrived. Ameta dances variously in a 
spectacular manner, and the three Brooklyns are clever as 
freak musicians. Stanton and Modena have a sketch that 
amuses, and the hold-overs are worth holding for a while. 

PORTER GARNETT. 



This week sees the finish of the comic opera term at the 
Tivoli. On Monday "Aida" will inaugurate tue grand opera 
season. The cast will be as follows: Aida, Nice Barbares- 
<-hi: 'Amneri, Collamarini; Radames, Castelano; Amauasro, 
Salassa; Ramphis, Dado; The King, Nicolini. On Tuesday 
night "Rigoletto" will be given with the following distribu- 
tion: Gilda. Repetto; The Duke. Russo; Rigoletto, Ferrari; 
Sparafucile, Nicolini; Magdalena, Politini. The enlarged 
orchestra will be under the direction of Mr. Paul Steindorf. 

* * * 

Mr. Chauncey Olcott will continue at the Columbia next 
week in his Irish comedy, "Garrett O'Magh," giving the final 
performance on Sunday nignt, August 4th. On the 5th of 
August begins the engagement of Mr. Charles Frohman's 
Empire Theatre Company, of New York City, presenting 
"Mrs. Dane's Defense." Margaret Anglin and other favor- 
ites will appear. 

* * • 

The Molasso-Salvaggi troupe of French dancers will make 
their first appearance in San Francisco at the Orpheum 
to-morrow afternoon. Alexandra Dagmar comes di- 
rect from London with late songs and fetching costumes. 
Arras and Alice, the European novelty team, return for one 
week only. Mr. Hugh Stanton and Florence Modena will 
present a new satire, "A Bargain Fiend," and Mr. Will H. 
Murphy and Blanche Nicholls will continue "The Bifurcated 
Girl." The hold-overs will include Ameta, the spectacular 
dancer, Mr. Ed. F. Reynard, the ventriloquist, and the three 
Brooklyns, musical drolls. The biograph will show the 
launching of Shamrock the Second. 

* * * 

"The Adventures of Nell Gwynne" is to be included among 
the several revivals by Florence Roberts this season, and 
commences next week. The version of "Nell Gwyne" used 
at the Alcazar is from the pen of the Californian play- 
wright, Charlotte Thompson. The cast will include Mr. 
White Whittlesey, Mr. Barton Hill, Mr. George Webster, 
Mr. Lucius Henderson, Mr. Carlyle Moore, Mr. Frank Bacon, 
Mr. Paul Gerson, Mr. Walter Belasco, Agnes Rankin, Marie 

Howe, and others. 

* * * 

At Trinity Church to-morrow (Sunday) evening the choir 
will sing "The Nativity," by Dr. H. J. Stewart, the organist. 
Dr. Stewart is to leave San Francisco shortly, and the choir 
will sing his composition as a tribute to him. This will be 
a matter of gratification to his many friends. Dr. Stewart 
has done much while here for the advancement of music. 
An artist of high standing, he has imparted to others the en- 
thusiasm that he feels, and has raised the standard of every 
musical organization with which he has come in contact. 
His departure will be keenly felt by the music lovers of 
San Francisco. 



Columbia Theatre. 



(IOTTU>>, Hill * 

T *m> m and Msnit»n. 
To nl«hl. RacnUf i .,- r.lvht. Steond and 

U-l week Iniinn Monday Th* dlallnnUbad Irt-h ooiuxllan. 



MR. GHAUNGEY OLGOTT 

In til« lateat oomody •uoo**«, 

GARRETT O'MAGH 

Written t.jr Auiriifttu* I'ilou, Mana««r. 

AiiB.nl ft Empire ThciUr. ('.. , m "Mr*. ban. • rtefmce-' 



Tivoli Opera Mouse. ^^35SS£5SSi«. 

I.MI Nlilil. of tho (Jrn.l Comic lilt. 

THE TOY MAKER 

Monday. July IMh. Oponlnit ol (lie (IKAND OPERA SKASON- 
First Week. Verdi's Famous W..rk. 

AIDA 
Monday. Wednesday. Friday. Saturday, 

RIGOLETTO 

Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday matinee. Sunday. 

E\ cuius- at 8. Matinee Saturday at 2. 

Popular prices— 25. 50. and 75 cents. Telephone Bush 9. 



Alcazar Theatre. B "^*^ AL ^rffiJ-,. ™ 

Commencing Monday, July 29th. 

FLORENCE ROBERTS 

Supported by White Whittlesey, in a Notable Revival ol 

THE ADVENTURES OF NELL GWYNNE 

Next— Charlotte Thompson's New Play, " A Silver-Mounted 
Harness." Positively the first production on any stage. 
Only Matinee— Saturday. Seats on sale six days in advance. 
Prices— 15o, 25o, 35c, 50c. and 75c. 



Orph 



eunrv 



San Francisco's Greatest Muslo Hall. 

O'Farrell St.. between Stockton and Powell streets. 



Vaudeville's Choicest Gems! MolaBso-Salvaetri Troupe; Alex- 
andra Dagrmar; Stanton & Modena; the Three Brooklyns, Will 
H. Murphy and Blanche Nicholls; Arras and Alice, Ed. F. Rey- 
nard, Ameta, and the JBiograph- 

Reserved Seats 25c.: balcony I0o.; opera chairs and box seats. 50. 
Matinees Wednesday. Saturday, and Sunday- 



Mechanics' Pavilion 

Farewell Organ Recitals by 

DR. H. cJ. STEWART 



Saturday afternoon, 
29, at 8.15 p. m. 
Admission, 25 cents. 



July 27, at 3 p- m. Monday evening, July 



After the Theatre 



Go where the orowd eoea— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string; band and enjoy the finest 

wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zinkand Is society's gathering place after the theatre 

over 



Automobiles 



If you want to know how to get one 
write for particulars. 

We build to order Gasoline Auto- 
mobiles, Steam Automobiles and 
Automobile parts. 

Automobiles cared for, repaired 
and delivered on telephone order. 

California Automobile Co.. 



Factory, 346 McAllister St. 
Phone Jessie 866- 



Main Office, 222 Sansome St 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 27, 1901. 




Library&abk 




"Tarry Thou Till I Come, or 
Tarry Thou Till I Come Salathiel, the Wandering Jew," 
the historical romance hy George 
Croly, first published in 1S27, has been recuscitated and pre- 
sented again to the reading public in a luxurious garb, with 
fine illustrations by the American artist, T. de Thulstrup — 
the frontispiece in colors — and a most eulogistic introduction 
by General Lew Wallace. The story covers the gap of thirty- 
seven years from the crucifixion to the overwhelming 
triumph of Titus over Jerusalem with his Roman army. Dr. 
Croly has carefully studied the ancient Jew and brings into 
the strongest light possible the wonderful individuality of 
the Jewish nation of 1S00 years ago. Salathiel, the hero, 
is doomed to wander till the Second Coming of Christ. In 
a moment of blind fury, he aids in bringing the Master to the 
cross and Christ utters against him the words of condemna- 
tion: "Tarry Thou Till I Come," the words which doomed 
him to immortality on earth — for the Wandering Jew still 
wanders. As a series of graphic pictures, and a specimen of 
sustained imaginative work, as a remarkably chaste story 
told with a great spirit of reverence and a profound respect 
for sacred things, Dr. Croly's bock has in it undoubtedly the 
germ of perpetuity, but its archaic style, its long dis- 
quisitions, its didactic passages, its interminable moralizing 
make it rather tedious reading for the present generation, 
we think, notwithstanding General Lew Wallace's opinion 
to the contrary. In his introductory letter to the publishers 
he writes: "In my judgment, the six greatest English novels 
are 'Ivanhoe,' 'The Last of the Barons,' 'The Tale of Two 
Cities,' 'Jane Eyre,' 'Hypatia' and this romance of Croly's. 
If Shakespeare had never been born; if Milton, Byron and 
Tennyson were singers yet to be, and Bacon, Darwin and 
Ruskin unknown * * still the six works named would of 
themselves suffice to constitute a British literature." 

Funk & Wagnalls Company, Publishers, New York. Price 
$1.40 cents net. 

There appeared not long since in the 

Home Thoughts. Saturday supplement of the New York 
Evening Post, under the title "Home 
Thoughts," and over the signature "C," a series of essays, 
which were greeted with marked appreciation. It has been 
deemed expedient to reprint them in more enduring form. 
These home thoughts are a woman's thoughts, a gentle- 
woman's surely, for their simple sincerity strikes a sym- 
pathetic chord which will vibrate warmly in the hearts of all 
those anxious to raise family life to its highest plane. Wise 
counsel is offered to parents in "A Neglected Subject of 
Education," and "My Son's Wife and My Daughter's Hus- 
band;" tender, genuine feeling is shown in the charming 
study "After the Wedding," practical sense and sage advice 
in "Living up to the Wedding Presents," and in "The Home- 
lessness of Certain Married Women" the writer sounds a 
warning note which the young men and young women who 
elect to live in boarding houses and hotels would do well to 
heed. The formation of character by right home education 
and training, and the consequent influences upon social 
life and patriotism are ably discussed. Other subjects 
treated in an earnest and very human way are "The Eldest 
Born," "Disagreeable Children," "The Unconquerable Ego," 
"Children as Our Judges," "Wires as Partners," "The Eti- 
quette of Family Life," etc. From first to last these essays 
are a plea for the idealization and elevation of home life 
' that from our own firesides shall go forth a persuasion to 
young hearts around it to find in high thinking and plain 
living a satisfaction which never palls." 

A. S. Barnes & Co., Publishers, New York. Price $1.60. 

"Apostles of the Southeast" is the title of Frank T. Bul- 
len's latest story. As a writer of sea tales his fame grows 
apace, and since the success of "The Cruise of the Cache- 
lot," his first book, he has been devoting himself exclusively 
to literary work. 



"An Englishman's Love-Letters" purport to be the missing 
answers to these remarkable love-letters of an English- 
woman, the authorship of which has been attributed to so 
many different persons and the mystery of which still re- 
mains unsolved. They lack spontaneity, and when com- 
pared with the originals are "stale, flat, and unprofitable." 
They are rather cleverly contrived, however, to fit into their 
predecessors, and for that reason alone may attract those 
not already surfeited with the amatory correspondence 
so much to the fore of late. 

Frank F. Lovell Book Co., New York. 

"Mabel Gordon," by R. K. D., is a rather weak story, with 
a religious purpose. It tells of a dainty Southern girl who 
shortly after the war meets a certain Colonel Chester, by 
whose order her parents' home had been destroyed some 
years previously by Northern soldiers. The gallant Colonel 
announces, as many a man has done before, that "feminine 
beauty has no charms for him, that he is thoroughly in love 
with his profession, to the exclusion of all other loves," 
and then immediately proceeds to lose his heart to the fair 
rebel. The wooing of the woma.n hater and cynic is not with- 
out its tribulations, but eventually old wounds are healed, 
and through many sorrows they are led to "read life's mean- 
ing in each other's eyes." 

J. S. Ogilvie Publishing Company, New York. Price 50 cts. 

"Content in a Garden" is a useful and practical treatise on 
flowering plants and herbs by Candace Wheeler. It is a de- 
tailed account of the experiences and observations of the 
author in her own garden of content, which lies well up on 
Onteora Mountain. Typographically the book is most inter- 
esting, and its broad margins, artistically decorated with 
sketches of nature's many floral treasures, are decidedly at- 
tractive. The decorations are by Dora Wheeler Keith. 

Houghton, Miflin & Co., Publishers, Boston. Price, $1.25. 

"The Benefactress" is the title of a new book by the author 
of "Elizabeth and Her German Garden," which will appear in 
the near future. 

"The Mysterious Burglar" is a story by George E. Walsh, 
in which hypnotism plays an important part. 
F. M. Buckles & Co., Publishers, New York. Price, $1.25. 

"The Worm that God Prepared" is the rather startling title 
of a new novel by John Oliver Hobbs, which is shortly to 
appear simultaneously in England and America. 

"Father Hecker," by Mr. Henry D. Sedgwick, Jr., and 
"Louis Agassiz," by Alice Bache Gould, are the latest addi- 
tions to the Beacon Biographical Series. Each volume is 
perfaced by a fine portrait. 

Small, Maynard & Co., Boston. Price, 75 cents each. 

"The Seal of Silence," by A. R. Condor, will appear as the 
300th number of the "Town and Country Library," a series 
of novels published by D. Appleton & Co., which has met 
with much favor from a wide-spread audience. The new 
r.ovel will be a romance of the present day. Mr. Condor, 
like the author of "David Harum," never saw his book. He 
was a young Oxford graduate, who finished this, his first 
work, in December last, just a month before his death. 

"Father Hecker," by Henry D. Sedgwick, Jr., and "Louis 
Agassiz," by Alice Bache Gould, are the two new volumes 
which have been added to the Beacon Biographies Series. 
A fine portrait prefaces each work. Small, Maynard & Co., 
of Boston, are the publishers. 



Books Received. — Funk & Wagnalls Co.: "The Jewish 
Encyclopedia. Vol. 1," Isidore Singer, Managing Editor, price, 
(cloth), $7 per volume; $84 per set (12 volumes.) 

D. Appleton & Co.: "The Seal of Silence," by Arthur R. 
Conder (Town and Country Library), price, 60 cents. 

MARY E. BUCKNALL. 



BOOKS REVIEWED IN THIS PAPER 
Can be Obtained at 



Robertson's 



126 Post Street 



July 27, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



&own Crier 

'Me*r IJx CritT*'.tft»t tht dent art /km ' '. 
'Ok Out wiltpUf the orrrt. Jlf. mtt/ou ' -1 



*£-. 




Sampson and Schley, both brought to Rome 

By Santiago's story. 
Now fight that battle o'er again 

With loss than former glory. 

As hot as in the days of gore 

Whore shot and shell were raging, 

With oratory aimed to kill, 

A wordy war they're waging. 

Tut. tut, for shame, ye admirals! 

Avoid such wordy schism; 
Kor oratory is not war, 

But rather pugilism. 

I am glad to see that some of California's greatest scien- 
tists have seen fit to agree with the Crier concerning the 
comic opera scheme of the Yosemite Commissioners to turn 
the Yosemite Falls into a cross between a midway plaisance 
and a church social. It also gratifies me to note that the 
newspapers have come — though somewhat tardily — into line 
and taken up arms with the Crier and the scientists. There 
are among the Commissioners some whose actions in this 
matter cause us no particular surprise. There is Comrnis- 
ioner W. W. Foote, who never has added very much dignity 
to a dozen or more committees to which he has always been 
addicted. Since going to Paris Mr. Foote has gotten entirely 
too high falutin' for the untrimmed West, and it is not at all 
amazing that he wants our primeval' forests to resemble 
the Street in Cairo at the Exposition International. Unless 
the tastes of Mr. Foote have changed considerably since his 
trip abroad, he will recommend that red lights predominate 
in the new Yosemite Side Show. That Mr. Foote and some 
others should have taken such a stand, I repeat, is not much 
of a surprise; but "there are men engaged in this conspir- 
acy" of whom I thought better. Truly the West is all it 
has been accused of being. If we "improve" the Yosemite 
1 cannot but agree with the European pessimist who said 
that we could not live up to the gifts which God has given 
us. 

Josh Billings' famous saying, "It's better not to no so 
mutch than to no so menny things that ain't so" might be 
adopted with profit by the Call. As a disseminator of mis- 
information that paper has taken a great spurt lately. Its 
present stunt is solemnly announcing the removal, in the 
immediate future, of various heads of departments of the 
Southern Pacific Company. Out of a score or more pre- 
dicted one or two such removals have occurred, and in each 
case the Call has gleefully cried out, "I told you so." Within 
the past two weeks it has settled the future fate of nearly 
every prominent man in the employ of the Southern Pacific, 
and now has added to the gaiety of those who know the facts 
by asserting that Mr. W. H. Mills is to be removed. To the 
Crier that comes near being a joke, and I think even the Call 
really knows better. Mr. Mills is one of the most valuable 
men employed by the Southern Pacific, and the Southern 
Pacific fully appreciates how valuable he is and always has 
been. I would recommend that the Call hire a new prophet 
before that satirical bird, the thinking public, begins to re- . 
gard that publication as a comic paper. 

Arthur I. Sanchez, former inspector of customs, was shot 
last week by a policeman whose house he was attempting 
to burglarize. Sanchez, who is wanted on several charges, 
did a wise act by choosing the house of a policeman for 
the scene of his pilfering — not a wise act for Sanchez, 
but a very safe one for the commonwealth in general. San- 
chez's example might well be copied by law breakers at 
large, who might thus save the police a deal of unnecessary 
vigilance. 



We Californiant nr.- Mippo ipply 

"' ' :,|r| > *ood Insane uj In 

though we were going to ba obllgad to build a hundred 
and dedicate them t.. the use* ..f the worl ■, who 

ore getting more and more In need of treatment u the strike 
advances, These same loud-mouthed agitators who 
years ago, were too glad to earn $i a day Irom the fun. is 
which were subscribed by the business men □( tl 
the purpose of providing tor their waj men 

who accepted the help of charitable citizens hve rears ago, 
o-day the loudest tn howl down their b The 

reason Is obvious. Prosperity has made them mad. During 
the Inst two years these workingmen. Instead ol bi lug em- 
ployed mi public Improvements and expensive charity, have 
l» on engaged in ship-building, and every industry where 
labor could be used, at the highest wages paid in any part 
of the world. They have grown sick of the steady employ- 
ment for which they were "wont to lift a pathetic voice in 
the hard times gone by, and are babbling socialistic falla- 
cies against their employers because, forsooth, the rich are 
making hundreds of thousands where the laborers are mak- 
ing hundreds. The chronic strikers are mere children — 
babes in the wood, lured on by the silly altruisms of dema- 
gogues and professional organizers. Any fool can do a lot 
of harm, and the strikers are doing a fool's quantity of it. 
When the war broke out, California and her merchants 
had millions of dollars paid to them for supplies. Prosperity 
reigned and the working classes tasted of their just share 
in the abundant wages they received. But now the strike 
madness is on the people, and the unions are playing the 
dog in the manger — a game at which everybody loses. 
This short-sighted policy of the unions will never get their 
members what they ask — more than their services are worth. 

Oh, Berkeley is a quiet town, 
A place of academic groves 
Where grave professors daily walk 
And co-eds flock in droves. 

And as a record for the town, 

Prithee, observe, kind sirs and madams, 

The case of Mr. Brandes and 
The trial of Mr. Adams. 

These crimes domestic aired in court 
Would lead us to the observation 

That Berkeley almost livens up 
In times of relaxation. 

I see that Mr. Al Hayman intends building a new theatre 
in San Francisco. It gratifies me to read that such is the 
case, but my joy is somewhat abated when I learn that the 
new playhouse is not going to be a temple of melodrama. 
Now, what San Francisco wants is not melodrama, but more 
melodrama. We have to tease our public to enjoy grand 
opera at $7 a head, and even an Ibsen play does not quite 
depopulate all the mansions South o' Market street. But 
even when two prosperous melodrama factories are rattling 
away vigorously seven nights in the week, we can all afford 
to see Miss Bates sacrificed to crowded houses in the glar- 
ing light of "Under Two Flags." If Mr. Hayman wants to 
elevate the drama, let him put up a first-class theatre and 
heaven bless his act: but if he wants to make money, let 
him give us what we want — more scenery, more gore, more 
melodrama. 

"Boys will be boys"; also, at times, they will come so near 
being criminals that they should go to jail. Of such are 
Herman and Eric Kobbe, of Fort Mason. For some time 
past these youths have been using San Francisco Bay as a 
target, and from the porch of their father's residence at the 
Fort have been sending a hail of 22-calibre bullets through 
the air, all in the direction of the bay. One of these bullets 
struck another boy, Paul Wissig, inflicting a wound that 
nearly proved fatal. Hermann Kobbe, the older of the 
offenders, intimated that the affair was nobody's business. 
Herman is sadly mistaken. It is everybody's business. 
The Crier suggests that, as punishment, Herman be made to 
do the William Tell act, with baseballs as ammunition, and 
a prize for every time the thrower misses the apple and hits 
Herman. 



10. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 27, 1901. 




"What a long time our 'hot term' is in coming to us this 
year," is a remark one often hears nowadays. Instead of 
complaints rejoicings would he better that we have es- 
caped the roasting the unfortunates the other side of the 
Rockies have heen enduring of late, and all our recent ar- 
rivals who were compelled to undergo a taste of it in tran- 
sit declare California in general and San Francisco in par- 
ticular the only place on this continent fit to live in. So 
seemed to think many of the Epworth Leaguers, who have 
now gone on their homeward way with only words of praise 
for San Francisco and its people. Assuredly they were 
well treated. They enjoyed several of those beautiful days 
of which we were so proud, can speak knowingly of San 
Francisco's wind and fog, and experienced an earthquake — 
though a mild one; so what was there left to be desired? 
Their departure has given a rather deserted look to the 
streets which last week were so crowded, hut summer vaca- 
tions are nearing an end, and the tide of travel from coun- 
try resorts will soon he citywards; so it will not now be long 
ere they resume their normal appearance. 

The next large body of visitors to come to us will be the 
Episcopal Convention, which meets here in October. It will 
include noted divines and distinguished laymen from all 
over the Union to do honor to whom the Episcopalians of the 
Pacific Coast are now making extensive preparations. 

July is always a trying month in the society life of San 
Francisco, for most of its members are amusing themselves 
elsewhere. Socially this has been the quietest week in the 
city this summer. There has not even been a wedding to 
liven us up a bit. In that line those to look forward to are 
the Baldwin-Sanborn nuptials and the wedding of Miss Edith 
Stubbs. September 4th is the date named for the marriage 
of Miss Harriet Griswold and Mr. John A. Faull; it will be 
an evening ceremonial, taking place at the Central Avenue 
residence of Mrs. W. 0. Gould, aunt of the fair bride-elect. 

The engagement of TVIrs. Agnes Burrell Nation to that 
popular young medico, Dr. Louis C. Deane, was one of the an- 
nouncements made last week. 

There was another lively paper chase ridden at San Rafael 
last Saturday, a score or more of ladies and gentlemen tak- 
ing part in the eight miles' cross-country run. Miss Brad- 
shaw won the ladies' cup, Mr. Frank Glass carrying off the 
gentlemen's trophy, with Mr. Graham Babcock as a close 
second. Euchre parties have been the chief dissipation at 
the Hotel Rafael this week, though golf and tennis have 
both had their votaries. The arrival of Mr. Trux Beale and 
Mr. Fred Greenwood were hailed with delight. They are 
both popular beaux with the ladies. 

One of the summer fads has been the Saturday matinee 
parties at the different theatres, made up chiefly of young 
ladies from some of the near-by resorts with a young matron 
as chaperon. Blingum has furnished a good many of them, 
and hardly a Saturday has passed since early in the season 
that several have not been seen taking in "the show" at the 
Columbia, prominent among them being those presided over 
by the Mesdames Taylor. 

The passing of the Goad house into the hands of other 
owners has caused much regret, awakening memories of the 
many hospitalities and handsome entertainments within its 
doors during the lifetime of Mrs. Goad, and afterwards of 
her charming daughter, Miss Ella, who so ably succeeded 
her mother as hostess. The new owner, Mr. Fred Tillman, 
is another of the Spreckels connection whose large houses 
are already so marked a feature in that part of the city. 

Our absentees are coming back to us, and those who are 
already here express themselves as happy to be on Cali- 
fornia soil again. Mrs. Henry Weatherbee arrived a few 
days ago from a lengthened tour abroad, and is at her home 
in Fruitvale. Mrs. C. A. Spreckels and Miss Lurline arrived 
here "ast Tuesday after a long absence, spent chiefly in 



Paris, and are domiciled for the present at the Palace Hotel. 
Mrs. Abby M. Parrott is on her way home, having reached 
New York last Saturday. She has been spending several 
months in Scotland with, her daughter, Mrs. Douglas Dick, 
whose husband has returned from his term of service 
in South Africa. Mr. Frank Newlands, M. C, and Mrs. New- 
lands, returned to Washington last week from their trip 
to Europe, and are looked for at their home in Reno early 
next month. Mrs. Newlands' San Francisco friends will 
have an opportunity of greeting her, as she purposes paying 
this city a visit before returning East. We shall soon have 
Miss Celia Tobin back with us, as she and her brother are 
now on their way home from Paris, where Miss Tobin has 
been for' some time. Mrs. Nopie le Breton and her charm- 
ing daughter are among the recent additions to the Ameri- 
can colony in that gay city, and have joined Mrs. Stuart 
Taylor in her menage. The latter will no doubt now delay 
her return to New York with Mrs. Pierre Lorlllard, the re- 
cent death of Mr. Lorillard of course precluding the antici- 
pated functions to be given in honor of the debut of Miss 
Emily Taylor into the Gotham swim by her father's sister, 
Mrs. Lorillard. Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Alexander are visiting 
Lake Tahoe this week, having reached there from New York 
last Saturday. The autumn is usually the period chosen for 
a visit to Lake Tahoe, but this summer the hotels there 
have been crowded for weeks past. Among those of the vis- 
itors best known in our social world are the J. B. Stetsons, 
the H. E. Bothins, Mrs. Austin Tubbs, Mrs. McAfee, Miss 
Susie Blanding, the J. L. Flood party, including Miss Jenny 
and Mr. John Twigg, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hobart, Mr. and 
Mrs. Claus Spreckels, Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Baldwin, Dr. 
Henry Gibbons, and Miss Marjorie, Mrs. J. D. Spreckels and 
Miss Lillie, Judge and Mrs. Sewell, and others. The Brig- 
hams and Babcocks, who have homes of their own in that 
locality, have been kept very busy doing the civil to their 
iriends, and the many novel and pretty entertainments 
planned by them have been greatly enjoyed by the city 
folk. 

Mrs. Charles Mackintosh will spend the next few weeks 
in the Santa Cruz Mountains. Mrs. Bowie-Detrick has been 
visiting Mrs. Chris Reiss at Menlo Park. Ex-Senator Felton 
has his daughter Kate — now Mrs. S. B. Elkins of Philadel- 
phia — and her children visiting him at his country place 
near Redwood City. Major and Mrs. W. L. Kneedler leave 
to-morrow for San Diego, where they will remain several 
weeks ere proceeding to their new station, West Point. Miss 
Nan Marshall sails on the transport Kilpatrick next Thurs- 
day for Manila, where she will be married to Captain Cole 
of the Sixth Cavalry, U. S. A. Among recent returns to 
town are Mrs. Monroe Salisbury and party from Howell 
Mountain; the W. I. Kips from Shasta; Dr. Henry Gibbons 
and daughters from Deer Park Inn; Mrs. Asa Wells and fam- 
ily from Highland Springs, and Mr. and Mrs. John Simpson 
and the Misses Agnes, Maud and Amalia Simpson from Ro- 
wardennan. 

Del Monte has its usual quota of visitors this week, many 
of them being from the East; dinner parties have again be- 
come quite the fad, both Mr. Ed Sheldon and Mr. Ed Green- 
way having appeared in the role of hosts. The pretty toi- 
lettes of the ladies have been much admired, but the hand- 
somest costumes are reserved of course for the festivities 
of the coming month. Mrs. Leopold Michaells and her 
mother, Mrs. Levy, have joined the fashionable throng 
there mis week. Mrs. Eleanor Martin is also due for a short 
visit before going to the wedding at Newport of her son 
Peter and Miss Lily Oelrichs. Another visitor at Del Monte 
will be Miss Rutherford, who is expected here from the East 
next week, and as she does not sail for Japan till the end 
of August she will be able to take in the week of sports at 
Monterey. With Mrs. Alexander and Miss Rutherford at 
Del Monte it will seem like old times. 

Society is eagerly looking forward to the sixth annual 
meeting of the Pacific Coast Polo and Pony Racing Asso- 
ciation, to be held at the Hotel Del Monte during the week 
commencing August 19th. Golf, racing and polo are on the 
programme, and many special prizes and cups are offered. 
Golf tournaments will be held during five days of the week, 
polo during four days, and racing every day. Coaching will 
continue during the entire week. It Is the intention of those 
interested to make this the most successful meet ever held. 



July 27. IM1. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



The followliiK nt eh.- H 

man, Mr. M. Mila.l and wire, \V \ 

Dwlftht, Mrs. C. Meyer, Mr. J. K. Polk. Mr Co 
tag. Mr. William 1> Forbes, Hi Blsmund Schwabacker and 
rami!'. ibjr, Ulaa Mr l! S 

rls. Mr. H. Moechioeker, Mr. It. M. FiUgeralu, H 
Hopkln». Mr. Ralph Brown and wife, Mr. \V. U H 
Mr. S. S. Rockwood. 



July 



MENDOCINO STORM. 
Tin- Bowen that won- thirsty for the dew, 
And to the nighty heaven did complain, 

Were drowned and routed by the crushing rain 
That rrom the floody heayen did ensue. 
The skies then yielded all their revenue 
Of waters, which could not ascend again 
To quench the lightnings. Loudly, but in vain. 
The thunders ransacked heaven to subdue 
The brightness, that, with intermittent flare, 
O'erflashed the fields with instantaneous 'lay. 
Provoked the angry lion in his lair; 
And he, his heart devouring his dismay 
At flashlight pictures of the distant town, 
Up heaves his head to nowl the thunder down. 
Hi, 1901. LIONEL JOSAPHARE. 



Two organ recitals will be given by Dr. H. J. Stewart 
before his departure for Boston. The first will be given this 
afternoon at 3 o'clock, and the second Monday evening. 
Both will be held in the Mechanics' Pavilion. Dr. Stewart 
will use the organ that has been built for the Memorial 
Chapel of Stanford University, and will play two of the pro- 
grammes which he gave this summer at the Pan-American 
Exposition at Buffalo. , . 



Mr. Charles M. Hays, President of the Southern Pacific 
Company, has gone East for a conference with Messrs. E. 
H. Harriman and J. C. Stubbs on important matters in the 
company's affairs. Many and extensive improvements are 
to be made shortly, among them the Ogden-Lucin cut-off, the 
straightening of curves and reduction of grades on the Cen- 
tral Pacific in Nevada, the double-tracking of the coast line 
between here and San Jose, and the construction of the pro- 
posed bay shore cut-off from Third and Townsend streets 
to San Bruno. 



The Traffic Department of the White Pass and Yukon 
Route of Seattle, Wash., has issued some very handsome 
souvenir playing cards, each pack illustrating fifty-two 
scenes along the route to Dawson. These cards are of the 
best finish and quality. 



Hilbert Brothers, agents for the American Brewing Co., 
will move from 223-225 California street to 213 and 215 Mar- 
ket street. Their rapidly increasing business necessitates 
their occupying the whole building. 



The Christy & Wise, Commission Co., agents for the Hun- 
ter Rye Whiskey, and Black & White Scotch Whiskey, will 
move from their present quarters on Sansome street, to 
223-225 California street on August 1st. 



Wm. Wolff & Co., agents for Moet & Chandon and other 
high-class goods, will move from their present quarters, cor- 
ner of Fremont and Market streets, to their new building, 
214-218 Mission street, August 1st. 



A suit of new clothes costs money, but it costs very 

little to send your old suit to Spaulding's Cleaning and Dye- 
ing Works, 127 Stockton street, and have it thoroughly 
cleaned and renovated. They also clean gloves, neckties, 
curtains, tapestries, and all such articles quickly and thor- 
oughly. Goods called for and delivered. 



Watermelons, canteloupes, all kinds of fruits and 

vegetables at Omey & Goetting's, stalls 33-34-45-46, Cali- 
fornia Market. Everything new and fresh. 



Most everyone who has whiskey for sale compares its virtues to Jesse 
Moore "M" Whiskey 



OVERLAND 
MONTHLY 

August.... 



CONTENTS: 



Frontispiece. — Portrait of Miss P 

Pnotograph by Dr. Arnold Genthe. 

Rebellion in Photography Dr. Arnold Genthe 

Illustrated by the Author. 

When the Snows Drift * John G. Neirhardt 

An Indian Stbry. 

The Iron-Shod Woman Mrs. M. L. Terry 

Illustrated by Horen Patigian. 

For Gold. — Poem . < Walter Shea 

Illustrated by W. H. Bull. 

The Canadian Boatmen Pearllita C. Stadelmen 

Labor Organizations Charles A. Murdock 

Maneuvers of the California Guard.. James F. J. Archibald 

Illustrated by the author and by portraits. 

Liolah Clyde Scott Chase 

A Story of the Northwest. 

Johnson's Regeneration Robert V. Carr 

A Soldier Sketch. 

The Hike Robert V. Carr 

A Poem. 

Rooms to Let Mary C. Ringnalt 

Illustrated by Henry Raleigh. 

Current Books Grace Luce Irwin 

Review. 

Joseph Le Conte Wallace Irwin 

Sonnet. 

About Santa Barbara County C. M. Gidney 

Illustrated. 

From San Francisco to Monterey 

Illustrated. 



Price 10 Cents $1 per Year 



',2 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 27, 1901. 



■B 



■;•■:)'■':] :'■.•' .:;•';),■, 



LookarCn 



^^m 




Senator Fair was accredited with having spent nearly a mil- 
lion dollars in purchasing his seat in the Senate. He never 
denied it, and would say to a newspaper man whom he never 
expected to see again, "Let me reckon a minute, young fel- 
low. I can tell you to a dollar what it cost Stanford to go to 
the Senate, for I know what my expenses were. Stanford 
never did it in California for less than a million and a half. 
You see he had to buy them twice." 

Although Mr. Fair did not enjoy being Senator he never 
regretted the sum spent for the name of Senator. Notwith- 
standing that, he did not care for another title. If he 
had, he might have been Count James Fair, or in German, 
Graf Fair. 

Just before his death, the German Consul General in- 
formed a prominent real estate dealer that there was a 
German Graf who wished to sell his title and estates, as he 
was badly in debt. So the enterprising real estate man took 
it upon himself to dispose of the title and property for ninety 
thousand dollars. The first person he thought of was Sena- 
tor Fair. So he betook himself to the millionaire's office 
and stated his case. 

Although the Senator had a sense of humor he did not 
laugh, but considered it seriously. His first objection was, 
"I don't speak German." 

The real estate man had visions of the new Count appear- 
ing on his German estates and speaking English with an 
Irish accent, but he had sold real estate too many years to 
give away to unseemly mirth. 

"Just think," urged the real estate man, "what a nice 
thing it will be for your family. Charlie will be a Count, 
Mrs. Oelrichs will be a Countess, and likewise Miss Virginia. 
It will help them out a great deal socially." 

The Senator was almost persuaded and decided to think 
it over. The next day he said to the real estate man: 

"No. If my children want titles let them buy them with 
their own money. I am too old to care for that sort of non- 
sense." 

* * * 

Like most medical men, Dr. Leland, the City Coroner, has 
a theory ready to fit each ease, but he is still trying to ex- 
plain away the latest astral appearance, which baffles his 
scientific knowledge. It all came about through the passing 
of Mr. W. Clayton Pickersgill, the late British Consul. 
The consulate, as everyone knows, is situated at what is 
familiarly called "lime juice corner," because nautical men, 
mostly of the British persuasion, congregate in numbers 
there. And like Dr. Leland, the corner is stin speculating 
over the mystery, but unlike him, the simple-minded sailor 
folk frankly accept the apparition as a genuine wraith, whose 
mission was to predict the Consul's death. 

It would be hard to find a more fitting habitation for 
ghostly visitants than the old Merchants' Exchange building, 
at the corner of Washington and Battery streets. The 
gloomy structure, one of few early-time erections left in San 
Francisco, has in its day served many purposes. It was once, 
when Sacramento was flooded out, the seat of the Legisla- J 
ture, and again the Federal Supreme Court used to sit there. 
All kinds of associations cling to its narrow, winding pas- 
sages, and the few people who live there must have strong 
nerves. Well, the night before the Consul's death Dr. Le- 
land was summoned to attend a patient in the building, and, 
whilst there, found a young man named Alexander Norman! 
also a resident. 

"A week ago," said Mr. Norman, "I would have laughed 
at the idea of there being such things as ghosts, but now, 
well, it's different. I was going up-stairs late at night when 
I heard some one walking along the back passage. I waited 
to see who it could be, and there, when he turned the corner, 
was Captain Waterman, as plain as life. He always carried 
a stick, and as he moved along I could hear its tapping on 
the bare floor." 

"Pooh, pooh," said Dr. Leland, "mere hallucination. What 



kind of a pipe had you been smoking that night?" 

But next morning the Consul's death was announced. 
Captain Waterman, who died a few months ago, had long re- 
sided in the building, and was well known to Mr. Pickersgill. 
The genial Coroner still pooh-poohs the existence of the 
apparition, but adds cautiously, "If I really believed I had 
seen such a vision there's no fortune on earth could tempt 
me to live any longer in the same building." 

* * * 

The gem of the Epworth League Convention was sprung 
by Miss Woodcock of Chicago in her address to the Junior 
League on Saturday afternoon. The Looker-On gives it ver- 
batim as it was taken down by the stenographers. 

"Little children," said the speaker, "there is a black and 
bitter orange down in Florida. If one of you little children 
should bite into it, it would pucker up your little mouths 
as though you had tasted a green persimmon. But some- 
times they graft the stem of a sweet orange on its stem, and 
years and years later, when the blossoms have flown and au- 
tumn comes, they have the sweetest fruit in all Florida. 
And I thought when they told me about it how like it was 
to the human soul, how that too is hard and bitter until 
grace is grafted on it, when it Decomes the sweetest thing in 
all creation." 

I Miss Woodcock paused, stepped forward, pointed upward, 
and concluded: 

"Little children, there is a Great Grafter up there, and you, 
little men and women of California, are a good graft." 

♦ • * 

Mr. William R. Hearst, proprietor of the Examiner, New 
York Journal, and Chicago American, in his early youth was 
in love with Eleanor Calhoun, the actress, and wished 
to make her his wife. Although she was a friend of Mrs. 
Hearst, his mother objected to the match. Since that time 
he has never paid serious attention to any woman, but his 
favors have been distributed most promiscuously among the 
leaders of the Amazons and the ladies of the chorus. 

From New York comes the news that the position of a 
newspaper man of national fame may depend upon the 
caprice of the ruling lady of the court of William. It is no 
uncommon thing to see one or three favorites in the private 
office of the great editor during the busy part of the day. 
Not long ago, when Mr. James Creelman left the Journal, it 
was because for a lark Mr. Hearst allowed his Madame de 
Maintenon in Creelman's presence to blue pencil a serious 
article he had written. Immediately the writer resigned and 
returned to his old home, the World. 

Within the past month Mr. "Jo" Lewis, the brother of the 
famous Mr. Alfred Henry Lewis, "Dan Quinn," entered the 
Hearst sanctum in great haste. It was almost midnight, and 
it was necessary that Mr. Hearst glance over his article im- 
mediately. He had no time to look about the room, but took 
it for granted that Mr. Hearst was alone. 

The editor read Mr. Lewis' matter carefully and told him 
there were a few errors he would like him to correct. Mr. 
Lewis, who is impulsive, answered: 

"Very well, I will sit right down here now, and do the 
worK." 

He quickly backed up to the couch and seated himself. 
A horrified look on Mr. Hearst's face, piercing shrieks from 
e. woman, and a wild leap into the air executed by Mr. Lewis 
were the next startling events which occurred. 

Mr. Lewis discovered that he had sat upon the Hearst fa- 
vorite, who was availing herself of her prerogative of re- 
clining on the editor's couch. Mr. Lewis is not on the Jour- 
nal these days, but the men who remain behind are profiting 
by his fate, and they look about the room with great care 
before they seat themselves. 

Mr. Gavin McNab said when he heard the story: "Well, 
I wonder how Willie would like to have his slave girls taken 
away from him like the poor Chinamen." 
* * * 

Mr. Thomas Magee, the millionaire real estate man, is 
well on in the sixties, and one of the most athletic men of 
his years in San Francisco. Mr. Greer Harrison is somewhat 
younger than Mr. Magee, but the millionaire is as nimble on 
his feet and as good an oarsman as Mr. Harrison. 

Mr. Magee is not only athletic himself, but he insists upon 
the same wholesome mode of living for his sons and Mrs. 
Magee, who was the handsome Miss Helen Curtis. In con- 



July 27, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



13 



Mijuenc*. Mr*. Magee Is much more robust -looking than 
Before her marriage. 

teriatiea »f Dm millionaire is his 

(treat loTe for his family He Is faint-, I for his klmlti- 
all his relatives, and he Is bs lOiarUU to Um kin I 
Brat wife as to those of his second. In tact, he Is si III da 
'■i the memory of the first Hn Mm.-. • altboutii he 

Idollies the second Mrs Magee and their little girl baby. 

Mr. Magee always speaks of the first Mrs Mat- 
Mamma" In the presence of his second wife, ami nothing 
abates the loyalty to her memory, which Is very unusual 
when n man takes a young wife. 

The Magees have a beautiful place across the bay near 
rrultvale. and one of the favorite feats of Mr. Magee Is to 
arouse his wife early in the morning and walk several miles 
over the hills to "Mamma's grave. " 

So strongly does Mr. Magee approve of walking that he 
recommended it to Mrs. Magee in this way: If Mamma' 
had only taken nice long walks she might have been alive 
and well now." 

* * • 

Poolselling being an illegitimate form of sport, the pool- 
seller seems to be therefore an easy target for the sharper 
who grabbeth where he can. I hear that the poolrooms lo- 
cated at Warm Springs, in Alameda County, are not so 
cheerful to-day as they were a few weeks ago, and the 
reason of the aforesaid gloom Is due to those very sharpers 
I have mentioned. Not a dozen days ago, I am tola, the pool- 
rooms in this village awoke to find that the expenditures 
were exceedingly in excess of the earnings. It took about 
two days, so the story goes, for the bucket shops to lose 
something over $60,000, and to come to the conclusion that 
the wires were being tapped after the oft-tried manner. 
They were right. In a thicket a few rods from the rooms 
two speculators who had been formerly employed as West- 
ern Union operators were taking the Eastern results indus- 
triously, and placing their money accordingly. My inform- 
ant further declares that a lineman employed by the tele- 
graph company was sent along the wire to see what was 
amiss, and that in the course of his journeyings he came 
upon the grove where the impromptu "tickers" were at work 
— something must have happened to render the lineman's 
eyesight particularly poor, for when he returned he reported 
the line "in good order." The wire-tapping trick is an old 
one, but it seems to be the most profitable among that class 
of gentry who make a practice of robbing thieves. 

* * * 

When Observer Burkhalter of the Chabot Observatory of 
Oakland was in Georgia following up the total eclipse which 
occurred there a few years ago, he hired as retainer and in- 
strument bearer an old darkey, who assumed to be an au- 
thority on eclipses, because, he explained, they had had 
them every three weeks "befo' the wan." 

Arrived at the place chosen for observation, Mr. Burk- 
halter set up his sextant and spent a morning taking the 
exact latitude and longitude. The retainer watched the pro- 
ceeding with interest, and finally asked: 

"Whafo' yo' doin' dat, boss?" 

"Oh, just trying to find where we are." 

"Sho". I could a-tol' yo' long ago. We's just two houah's 
walk from Johnson's Cohners, headin' todes de Pinkson 

null." 

* ♦ * 

The woes of the commuter are many, but Mr. Emannuel 
Heller, the prominent young attorney and son-in-law of 
Mr. Hellman, the banker, thinks he has more than his share 
of them. The Hellers have a cottage in San Rafael for the 
summer, and the other night the lawyer felt that he must 
catch the 5.10 boat or lose his dinner at home. When he 
passed the Chronicle building he had just six minutes to do 
the trick in. 

He sprang on to the rear platform of a passing car, and 
asked the conductor if he could catch the 5.10 boat. The con- 
ductor smiled with seraphic sweetness, and answered, af- 
ter collecting the fare: "It can't be done." 

Heller answered, "Can't you hurry a hit? You have more 
than five minutes." 

"No use in hurrying. You ha"ve missed your boat," re- 
sponded the conductor triumphantly. 

Still the lawyer set his chin and refused to leave the 



Pears' 

Pretty boxes and odors 
arc used to sell such 
soaps as no one would 
touch if he saw them un- 
disguised. Beware of a 
soap that depends on 
something outside of it. 

Pears', the finest soap 
in the world is scented or 
not, as you wish; and the 
money is in the merchan- 
dise, not in the box. 

All sorts of stores sell it, especially 
druggists; all sorts of people are 
using it. 



car. He glared savagely first at the conductor and then at 
his watch. Four minutes, three minutes, two, one, and they 
were nearly two blocks from the ferry. At this point the 
car stopped to wait for a wheezy old lady overburdened with 
packages. The conductor was too polite and got off to as- 
sist the passenger to the platform. 

This was too much for Heller. Were he a profane man he 
would have sworn as he leapt from the car with dangerous 
mutterings, and raced down the middle of Market street for 
the ferry. 

The ferry clock pointed exactly 5.10, and he was a minute 
away. The conductor was right. He had lost his boat. 
\ et there was hope. Gathered about the Tiburon ferry were 
all his fellow commuters smiling at him. 

"Hold the boat!" he yelled between gasps. His collar 
was wilted, and the perspiration was streaming down his 
face. "Hold the boat, I say!" 

Judge McAllister was standing there, and he said, "I say, 
old chap, what is the matter? The boat is ten minutes late, 
you know." 

* * * 

"While great numbers of people are in town as they have 
been during the Epworth League and Schuetzen Bund con- 
claves just closed," an old policeman confided to me, "there 
are not such great numbers of burglars and sneak-thieves 
as you would imagine. The reason for this is simple. Just 
before large numbers of visitors are expected in town, 
the police make an organized raid on the criminal classes 
and keep them caged away safely and well unul the tour- 
ists have left the town. In the summer time, when the town 
is dull is when the most money Ts lost through burglaries. 
People will insist in going out of town and leaving valuables 
in their houses in a comparatively unprotected state. The 
public is getting wiser every year, however, and the result 
is that more people are putting their money during the sum- 
mer in the California Safe Deposit Vaults — the only place 
where a burglar's jimmy is a total failure." 



Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 
nrespoison oak and all skin diseases. Sold by all druggists. 

Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. 

Cooper & Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 



St. Louis A. B. C. Bohemian, the king of all bottled 

beers, brewed from the finest Canadian Barley and imported 
Bohemian Hops. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 27, 1901. 




The only conclusion that can 
Vulcan Company Wins be arrived at upon reading the 
Out in Court. decision of Superior Judge 

Thomas F. Graham in the suit 
of Allan R. Partridge against his co-directors of the Vulcan 
Smelting Company is that Partridge ought either to be 
confined in an insane asylum or be prosecuted for perjury. 
It just shows how the courts of the State can be used by ma- 
licious persons to air their spite in an attempt to impeach 
the character and reputation of anyone with whom they 
may have a difference. Fortunately the law in this case 
acted speedily and effectively in determining the falsity of 
the charges, exonerating the defendants, and exposing their 
unprincipled traducer in his true light. The charges had 
full publicity at the time the suit was brought in February- 
last, and it is only right and just that the victims of this 
malicious attack should have equally fair treatment when 
cleared of imputations which must naturally have borne 
heavily upon men whose innocence of the base charges has 
been promptly and clearly established. Even this is but a 
poor reparation for the injuries sustained, and a severe pun- 
ishment should certainly be meted out to the offender who 
dared to invoke the aid of a court of justice to promulgate 
his lying and malicious charges. If this does not come under 
the head of contempt of court it would be difficult to define 
the meaning and intent of this section of the Code. It seems 
impossible that any one can lay himself open to such an 
opinion as that laid down in Judge Graham's decree and 
walk out of court scott free. 

Allan R. Partridge, a director of the 
Swore to False Vulcan Smelting and Refining Corn- 
Statements, pany in the early part of the present 
year, filed a complaint in the Superior 
Court of this city against President Frank W. Page, vice-presi- 
dent George W. Baker, secretary Harry L. Baker, the Vul- 
can Smelting and Refining Company, Mr. Wm. H. O'Brien, 
Mr. J. D. Heard and sixty-two other defendant stockholders 
of the smelting and refining company, in which these defend- 
ants were charged with conspiracy, fraud and general mis- 
conduct in office. These charges were made under oath, 
and the complaint went fully into particulars, and later on 
were enlarged when a new complaint was filed by additional 
averments, the list of defendants being also increased. 
So closely were all the details particularized in the com- 
plaint and under oath that the matter was commented upon 
very freely by the daily press,' and in a manner highly un- 
complimentary to the Vulcan Smelting and Refining Com- 
pany and its officers, whose names appear above. For 
months these gentlemen rested under the obloquy of mali- 
cious fabrications, while the affairs of this company were 
tied up by a restraining order of the court, a proceeding 
justifiable enough from the fact that each and every charge 
or allegation by Partridge was made under oath. It is only 
now that they have been relieved from the effects of this 
groundless prosecution by the result of the trial before 
Judge Graham, who has dealt with the case in such a direct 
and summary manner that it will probably keep the court 
calendar clear from suits of this kind for some time to come, 
by putting a cheek upon any rascal who may have been 
counting by the ultimate success of Partridge to help him in 
carrying out a game of his own on the same lines. 

In the complaint sworn to by 
The Allegations Which Partridge he alleged that he 
Were False. was the inventor of the im- 

proved smelter owned by the 
Vulcan Smelting and Refining Company, and that instead of 
owning a large stock interest in return for his valuable 
concession, he had only been allotted a comparatively few 
shares. He swore that he had been hypnotized and made to 
sign away his rights to the company without due considera- 
tion, and that while elected a director he was in the minority 
at all times, and unable to direct the disposition of the com- 



pany's funds, which he alleged were distributed among the 
officers without and against his consent. The court found that 
these allegations, in each and every particular, were false, 
it was developed during the trial that when the litigation 
was started Partridge had assigned to Mr. M. F. Cochrane 
and Mr. W. R. Ramsdal 61,9i8 shares of the company's 
stock which he then held, and the court confirmed the trans- 
fer and the right of the assignees to hold these shares. This 
left Partridge with no interest whatever in the company. 
That his attorney, Mr. James W. Cochrane, approved of the 
decree is evident from the fact that he raised no objections 
when it was submitted to the court, and that he gave his 
written consent to dismiss another suit of a similar char- 
acter instituted Dy Partridge. 

In his decree Judge Graham did not 
Judge Graham mince his words in dealing with Par- 
Scores Partridge. tridge. According "to its terms judg- 
ment was ordered entered for the de- 
fendants and for the costs. All the allegations of the com- 
plaint charging fraud and conspiracy upon the part of the 
defendants against the plaintiff Partridge were declared 
"wholly untrue and unsupported by any proof submitted by 
the plaintiff. It was apparent to the court that the action 
of F. W. Page. George W. Baker and all the other directors 
and officers of the corporation had been fair and honest, 
with no proot or admission of counsel to support the allega- 
tions of Partridge; that their action had been of such a char- 
acter as to promote the best interests of all stockholders 
of the corporation, and that every allegation to the contrary, 
in the complaint filed, was wholly unfounded and inspired 
by malicious motives upon the part of Partridge." The judge 
ended his decision by dissolving the temporary restraining 
order heretofore issued by the court. Thus ends the chapter 
of court proceedings in a case which has done much to ex- 
pose the extremes to which men will go at times to vent 
their spite. It remains to be seen whether the victims of his 
malicious prosecution will rest content with the vindication 
of their character in open court, or pursue the matter by 
preferring penal charges against Partridge, in which they 
would seem to be fully justified. In the meantime the offi- 
cers and directors of the Vulcan Smelting and Refining Com- 
pany are to be congratulated upon the complimentary re- 
marks of Judge Graham in regard to their able and honest 
management of the concern in the interest of its stock- 
holders. 

The Sweepstake Company in- 
Pipe Making for tends to put on a large force of 

Sweepstake Company, men at once to prospect the vast 
acreage of gravel by cuttings and 
shafts. The pipe is now being made for the mine in tem- 
porary shops established there, where expert riveters are 
at work on the plates, some of which are of thick steel. 
The pipe as it is made is being shipped to the mine daily, 
and already quite a quantity has been delivered. This in 
itself will put a large amount of money in circulation in 
Trinity County, an army of men being already employed on 
the ground. The company is evidently employed in pushing 
work of a preparatory nature, in order to lose no time in get- 
ting at the values in the gravel. The Trinity County papers 
are quite enthusiastic over the progress already made, and 
augur brilliant results for the enterprise when the washing 
gets well under way. 

The London promoter has now taken up- 
Some Hot Air on himself the task of floating a company 
from Texas. formed with a capital of 51,875,000 in $5 
shares to acquire 7,040 acres in the Beau- 
mont oil fields of Texas, and the scheme is being widely 
advertised. This is a pretty round figure to ask for what 
is generally admitted to be nothing more than a prospect. 
The exact price asked by the vendor is $1,375,000, of which 
he has the nerve to ask $833,335 in cash. The directorate 
is said by one of the leading London financial papers, to 
be "eminently respectable, but pre-eminently amateur," 
which seems to be the trouble with a great many companies 
now at work in California. However, this inflated proposi- 
tion is not likely to be taken seriously, it is said, owing to 
the inordinate demands of the vendor. At $10 per acre he 
would probably be over-paid for his time and trouble in 
working up the game for the promoters on the other side, 
who, like himself, are not working for love. 



July 27, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



IS 



I In oil la 
The Local Oil 

Situation. market, which Is growing mot 

Doonced dally. Even the men who hare 
worked hnrdest wiih consummate Idiocy to roln the 
Inslneas by trampling the last Bicker ol life left In 
now to the front wilh n proposition. They ban 
In killing II that laid the golden egg, ami now they 

• it Th>' N has all along forecasted the re- 

mit whirh must certainly follow the manipulation of the 
market by ■ Mt of incompetents, who know no more about 
handling a stock than they do of the oil business itself. 
This has been the main cause of the decline in rallies. All 
the new class of stock manipulators thought they had to 
do was to sell shares. Never a thought of protecting their 
stocks, oh. no! that would reduce their bank account, and 
what were they there for if not to make money. They did 
make some money, certainly, but it was the silver of today 
with no forethought for the gold of tomorrow. As they 
have sown, so have they reaped, and to the gleaner will 
eventually belong tne spoil. All are asking is there a future 
to the oil business. Undoubtedly there is. but never on the 
lines laid down by these pioneer operators, attracted from 
the toil of labor in all its branches by the glamor of a finan- 
cial proposition which involved a project of selling for big 
money something which cost nothing or next to it. This is 
a game which requires brains and long years of training un- 
der skilled masters, and the new men lacked both. The mar- 
ket of to-day shows the result plainer than words can de- 
scribe it. Prices wrecked and companies on the verge of 
bankruptcy and forced to levy assessments even on the 
much vaunted "non-assessable" plan. The reaction will 
come when the trained men in the Boards — and there are a 
tew who know their business — find themselves in control 
of the situation, free from interference on the part of the 
tyros who are responsible for present unsatisfactory con- 
ditions. They will be placed there eventually, and then re- 
construction on business methods may be expected, and the 
oil industry will be placed upon the plane of prosperity, 
where it belongs, as one of the most leading industries in 
California. 

Business has been dull on the local 
The Local Stock and Bond Exchange during the 

Stock Market, week, with a weak tone in the industrial 
stocks. Gas declined, and so did sugar, 
and the canneries were easier, being affected to some ex- 
tent by the strike. There seems to be no reason for any 
such decline in the sugar list as that which has taken place. 
Mr. Pollitz, the well-known broker, who is largely interested 
in these Island companies, arrived home from a visit of 
inspection, and the gist of his report is as follows: Hawaiian 
Commercial crop would be about 27,000 tons, just 10,000 
tons more than the gossipers of the street made it. Hono- 
kaa and Paauhau have had a poor season through lack of 
rain, and if relief does not come soon there will only be 
a half crop. Hutchinson looked well, and Onomea will yield 
20 per cent more than last year. Kilauea is looking well, 
and has had no dry weather. Bonds hold firm, as usual, 
but sales for the week have been lighter than usual. 

The Clifton Consolidated copper 

London Buys Copper mines of Arizona, Limited, is the 
in Arizona. title of a new London corporation, 

formed to purchase and work the 
Morenci & Clifton copper mines of Arizona, with a capital 
of £500,000 in shares of £1 each. The former company has 
11 claims, a 100-ton concentrator, and 50-ton smelter. The 
prospectus of the latter includes 42 claims, with 14 more 
adjoining now held by the New England Copper Company 
of Boston. The Clifton Company proposes to enlarge 
the smelting plant to 500 tons. 

The difference in the management of 

A Well-Managed companies by trained and untrained 
Oil Company. men is clearly defined by the action of 
the Caribou oil stock, which is not only 
firm but has evinced an upward tendency of late. This com- 
pany is in the hands of men who know their business, and 
that the shareholders recognize this fact and have full con- 
fidence in their officers is shown by the manner in which 
they paid up the last assessment. Not a share of this stock 
was advertised as delinquent, a very notable event in the 



history of bon l» now 

telling oil t" its neighbor* it w.rk In the Held, and will find 
■ demand fur ererj barrel II 
The grade of the oil is lighter than others in the Bald, and 

•II ••inimamls a ready mar. 



InOO -lime 
1000 
500 " 


ini uan ki> utcrmn n 

Oil sno» km. 
UID rllll l,s AS TIIKY AHF. 

For rntlc by JOSEPH 11. 

Quilornla Fortune 


M..1.1 l.y 
- »lio 
TOI'I.ITZ. Co. 
*) 01 to 7» 

'.". 60 


1000 
500 

<000 
1000 
2000 


dalremonl , 

Cnnlrft Cost* 


30 

.. n 02 


a m 

075 
02S 

3S 
25 

50 

1 00 
15 








ISO " 

1000 

«ooo 

1000 






500 " 
50 






25 
10 00 
50 
75 








1000 






BOO 

iooo 






1 00 


50,0 
















2000 
1000 






25 
















75 
25 


2500 














500 




15 




5(j0 






25 



Above prices will show conclusively what Iva me nee savin z you can make 
in buying shares from 

Joseph B. TopLrrz. Stock Broker, 
Member Producers' Oil Exchange. Rooms 9 and 10. 330 Pine street. 



200,000 H. P. 

Developed by 

Pelton Wheels 




Operaline electric trans- 
mission plants alone : : : 

Sensitive Regulation 

Send for illustrated catalogue. 

THE 
PELTON WATER WHEEL CO. 

127 Main St- San Francisco- Cal- 
143 Liberty St.. New York, N. Y- 



nining riachinery s n uppl ies 

The Ropp Straight Line Furnace. 

Huntington Centrifugal Roller Mill. 

Bartlett Concentrating Table. 

James Ore Feeder. 

Roger Improved Crushing Rolls. 

Dodge Rock Breakers and Pulverizers. 

Two and Three Stamp Mills. 

Engines, Boilers, Steam and Power Pumps. 

Wood-Working and Iron-Working Machinery. 

PARKE & LACY CO. 21 and 23 Fremont street. 

PENINSULAR PLANISHED 

Steel Ranges 

WILL NOT CRACK OR BREAK, 

Saving at least 25 per cent, in Time and Fuel. They reaulre no 
Blacking-, always retain their Lustre, and there is no Paint or 
Japan to Burn oil'. Send for Catalogue, or, better yet. call in and 
see them. 



MANGRUM & OTTER, Inc. 

581-583 Market St. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 27, 1901. 



A FEW INCIDENTS. 



By Robert McTavish. 

Interrupted Eloquence. 

While Flanuagan was drawing the lager Schnitzenbier was 
investigating the free lunch counter and had helped himself 
liberally to sandwiches. When he had finished these he 
showed a liking for pickles and onions, and then started 
in on sandwiches again. Flannagan watched him nervously 
and with rising wrath, and after his fourth trip to the lunch 
counter he broke forth: 

"I don't know who you are, but, faith, I know what ye are. 
There's a rist'rant two blocks beyant." 

"Am I understanding vat you said to me?" said Schnit- 
zenbier. 

"Faith, it's little you oondersthand ixcept how to be a 
Dootch hog." 

"Vot you calls me some pigs — me? Ven I come here in 
now and spends my good money you calls me such names to 
me — " 

"Yis, I'll call ye annything I plaze, whin ye come into a 
rayspictable place and spind a nickel and ate tin cints worth 
of good loonch. Yer a hog of a Dootchman." 

"Mein Gott! Must I already stand here to-day and hear 
me such things of myself said? Been dis not your place I 
vould make some sausages of you out. I meet you outside 
some blaces else vich is not here now and ven I finish your 
mudder t'ink she never saw you before den nicht. Vat? 
If you come now mit der sidewalk outside I break mit you 
your own house down and send mit der coroner to come. My 
name vos been Schnitzenbier, und ven I gets started I vos 
like some houses afire " 

He'd have been talking yet if Flannagan hadn't hit him 
with a bottle. 



and purple. He waved his hands wildly in the air, danced 
on his hat, struggled for words, and at last yelled after the 
retreating wheelman: "Why in thunder don't you whistle 
your bell?" His friend laughed. 



A Modest Man. 
"Good afternoon, madame. I don't suppose the card I sent 
in conveys any information to you beyond the fact that my 
name is de Vere. I will explain the objects of my visit. 
First allow me to give you a little of my history. I am of 
one of the oldest and wealthiest families in the country. I 
was born to affluence and reared in luxury. No taste or 
wish of mine was ungratified. I lived such a rose-tinted 
life as only Ouida can describe. I flooded that part of the 
world immediately adjacent to myself with money. Then 
came a change. It is the old story of bad speculations, of a 
family fortune dwindling and finally disappearing. I was 
thrown upon my own resources. Imagine it, reared as I 
had been! I could not think of work, for two reasons. In 
the first place, I did not know how; in the second, I have in 
me that class feeling which is the mainstay and pillar of us 
of gentle birth. What a triumph it would be for the rabble 
if I, a haughty de Vere, should be compelled to earn my own 
biead. It could not be thought of. On the other hand, what 
a victory for me if I could devise some means of living 
without work, and thus demonstrate to them the superiority 
of the aristocracy. After reflection I concluded that there 
must be many people who, like myself, believe in this class 
distinction. Why should they not be willing to help keep 
alive this spirit of exclusiveness by assisting me? Why 
not help demonstrate to the mob that breeding is more 
potent than toil? With this belief I call upon you, among 
others, confident that, rather than see the barrier between 
the classes removed, you will be willing to contribute some- 
thing to my support. A dollar? Thanks. I already have 
enough for dinner, and this will do nicely as a tip to the 
waiter. Now if I can obtain enough elsewhere for a seat 
at the theatre to-night, it will be another triumph over the 
vulgar herd. Good afternoon, madame." 



Presence of Mind. 
The pompous man with the loud voice was talking to his 
friend as they crossed the street. "If there is anything I 
pride myself on," he said, "it is my presence of mind and 
readiness of speech. No matter what happens at any time 
or place I always think instantly and act and speak just as 
quickly. Now, for instance,"— just then a bicyclist struck 
him fairly and squarely, knocked him down and ran over 
him. The pompous man struggled to his feet, his face red 



Answers to Correspondents. 

By Ella Wilier Wheelcox. 



Bohemia. 
Oh give me a chilly garret 

With plenty of grease and dirt, 
Oh give me a look unshaven, 

Likewise an unlaundered shirt. 
The palace of the Philistine 

Ain't good enough for me; 
I'm wedded to dirt and genius — 

A Bohemian I'd be. 

I scorn the poor, wealthy layman 

With haircut and shaven cheek, 

Who nods to his clerk and banker, 
And bathes at least once a week. 

Talk not of his vulgar pleasures — 
Pray what are his joys to me, 

Who revel- in dirt and genius, 
A Bohemian to be? 

I am sometimes sorry for my correspondents. I have one 
in mind this week for whom I feel a thrill of unmixed pity. 
He writes me asking "what is a Bohemian?" "I have been 
in town two weeks," he continues, "and I have seen some 
very interesting sights, but I have been obliged to leave 
town without seeing a Bohemian, which was a great disap- 
pointment to me. While in the city I saw the grizzly bear 
at the park; I also saw a policeman arrest eight drunks 
and a laundry wagon all in a bunch and an old lady fall 
off a cable car and sprain her wrist. All that was good 
enough in its way, but it didn't make up for not seeing a 
Bohemian, although the fight was considerable fun. I have 
read a lot about them in "Trilby," and Mr. Morrow's "Bo- 
hemian Life in Paris" — I wish I could have gone to Paris 
with Mr. Morrow. I have a very definite picture in my 
mind of a Bohemian sitting in his narrow garret, surrounded 
with works of art and with nothing to do but turn out gems 
of genius and be fed by ravens and grisettes. That is much 
easier than working for a living and so romantic." 

What is a Bohemian? The question is by now far too old 
to be funny. It is generally supposed that there are no 
Bohemians in San Francisco, that they are an extinct species 
or that they never did or never ought to have existed. By 
others it is supposed that the species was destroyed by the 
Board of Health in a late siege of municipal house cleaning. 
Later on tnis theory received a rude shock at the hands of a 
learned investigator who found that the species was not 
extinct as had at first been supposed, but that there was a 
Bohemian Club right here in San Francisco. This theory 
did not, however, entirely disprove the theory of extinction, 
for there are to this day those among us who maintain that 
there are no Bohemians in the Bohemian Club. What, how- 
ever, is the ground for this iconoclastic view, I do not know. 
If your persistence is great enough you can construct for 
yourself a new Bohemia. The receipt is as simple as it is 
inviting. First: do not be rich — riches are as fatal to a 
Bohemian as salt to a canary. Second: do not work — if 
you have to labor for what you eat, what's the use of being 
a Bohemian? Third: do not shave, wash or patronize res- 
pectable restaurants. These simple instructions, if indus- 
triously followed, will render you sufficiently picturesque to 
pass as a Bohemian of the deepest dye. The police may not 
know you by that name, and may take you for a vulgar 
vagrant, but do not mind their persecutions. The lower 
classes have no sense of finer distinction. 



Merchants. Miners, Mechanics and Farmers all drink Jesse Moore 
Whiskey in preference to any other brand. 



St. Louis A. B. C. Bohemian, the king of all bottled 

beers, brewed from the finest Canadian Barley and imported 
Bohemian Hops. 



July 27, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

BANKING. 



17 



London and San Francisco Bank. »imiw The Bank of California, San Francisco 



HEAD OFFICK-: 



<M CALIFORNIA STREET. 
Lombard *trcct. London. 



Capitol Authorised. tl.SO0.000. Capital Paid I'p. $1,400,000. 

Director* — Henry Oo*chon. Chairman. Lon d on; Charle* Edward Brether- 
lon, London: <"hH«lUn de cJiilgnc. Boa FranHwco: (liarle* Hcmery. 
London: John I* Howard. San Francis-; HrndU Koppcl. I»ndon: Nor- 
man D. Hideout. San Froncioco: Arthur Scrivrticr. Ignition. 

Inspector of Branchc*. OmUr Frledcrfeh. 

Af«DU In New York, Mean-*. J, P. Morgan & Co. 

BRANCHES: Portland. Oregon :Taooma. Wash.. Seattle. Wash- 

Letters of credit I •sued available for travelers and the purchase of mer- 
chandise In anjr city ol the world. Deal In foreign and domestic cxcIia n«o 
Accounts ol country banks received. Terms on application. 

W. Mackintosh. Mutineer 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With which Is amalgamated The Bank ol British Columbia 

HEAD OFFICE-Toronto. 

Paid Up Capital. $8,000,000. Reserve Fund. •2,000,000. 

Aggregate Resources over $65,000,000, 

Hon. Geo. A- Cor. President: B- E. Walker, General Manager. 

1 J. H. Plummet-. Asst. General Manager. 

LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St.. E- C, S. Cameron Alexander. Manage 

NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place, Alex. Laird and Wm- Gray. 

Agents. 

ONTARIO: 44 BRANCHES- 

Quebec: Montreal: Manitoba: Winnipeg: Yukon District 
Dawson. White Horse: British Columbia: Atlln, Cranbrook, Fernle 
Greenwood, Kami nope, Nanalmo, Nelson, New Westminster, Rossi and 
Sandon. Vancouver. Victoria. In the United States— New York, N. Y. San 
Francisco. Cal. Seattle, Wash- Portland, Ore- Skagway. Alaska. 
Bankers In London— The Bank of Scotland: Messrs- Smith, Payne & Smiths 
Bankers In New York— The American Exchange National Bank. 
Agents In Chicago — The Northern Trust Company. Agents in New Orleans- 
—The Commercial National Bonk. 

San Francisco Office: Walter Powell. Manager. A. Kains. Asst. Manaeer 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Suttee Sts. 

Subscribed Capitol $2,500,000 Paid-Up Capital, $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $1,000,000 

HEAD OFFICE— 40 Threadneedle street, London, E. O. 

AGENTS: New York— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank. 

Limited, No. 10 Wall street. N.Y.: Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 17 

Boulevard Potssonlere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 

Commercial and Travelers' Credits Issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM. O. ALTSCHUL, Managers. 
R. ALTSCHUL. Cashier. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Sansome and Pine Sts., San Francisco 
Jab. K. Wilson, President Wm. Piercb Johnson, Vice-President 

Lewib I. Cowgxll, Cashier F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL, $500,000 
SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS, 8130.000. 
DLRECTORS-Jomes K. Wilson, Wu. J. Duf ton, Wm. Pierce Johnson, Geo 
A. Pope. H. E. Huntington, Henry Pierce, C. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS : New York—Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank: 
Chemical National Bank, Boston—National Bank of the Commonwealth 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co.: Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis 
—The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London--* 
Brown. Shipley & Co. Paris— Morgan, Horjes & Co. 

Germania Trust Company of San Francisco 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital, $1,000,000 Paid-Up Capital and Reserve, $390,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian, or Trustee. 

Check Accounts of individuals, firms, and corporations solicited. 

Legal Depository for money in Probate Court proceedings. Interest 
paid on tbust deposits aht> savings. Investments carefully selected 
for our clients. 

Officers— F. Kronenberg, President; W. A. Frederick, vice-President; H. 
Brunner, Cashier 

Board of Directors— F. Kronenberg, W. A- Frederiok, Fred A. Kuhls. E 
A, Denlcke, A. G. Wleland, Fred Woerner. J. O. Rued, Fred O. Slebe 
John Rapp. 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. OOB. PlHK AND SANBOMK STB. 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized 16,000,000 Paid Up 81,600,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 Reserve Fund... 700,000 

Aeents at New York— J. & W. Selieman & Co.. 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the world 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange and bullion 

IQN. STE1NHART, P. N. IJLIENTHAL, Managers. 



Security Savings Bank 



222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 



Interest paid on deposits. 

William AJvord 
William Babcock 
Adam Grant 



Loans made. 
DIBEOTOBS. 

8. L. Abbot, Jr. 
O. D. Baldwin 
W. 8. Jones 



H. H, Hewlett 
E. J, McOutchen 
B. H,Pease 



cpim. fa.no 
Surplus, li.nro.ooo. 
Undivided Profits, .inly I. iwi. I /.-i,t»7.64. 

WILLIAM VIV..HI. I'rrMdrnll TIIO.MAH BROWH .fsahlrr 

(THARI.RS H. Illsllor , VI. r l-,,.i I I. P. MOU1 mv „Am'I CVwhler 

UiUlr M. (LAY.. BsflSJT I BAM n. DAWIBLB .A««'l r«j>hl<r 

i 0BBBBPONDKNT8 

New York ~Mc»«r«. I^tlfll.w A On,; Um Bank ol ItSW York. It, H. A. 
Baltimore -Tho National Kxch.ngp Hank. Boston ETstlonSl Hhawmnl 
Hank. Chlcano— Illinois Trunt and .Saving. Bank; Klml National Hank. 
1'hllmldlililB — Philadelphia National Bank. .Ht. f.Mlls BlMlllltSlt'll Bank. 
Virginia OUr, Nev.— Agency of The Bank ol California. Ixnuloii — Meanr. 
N. M. Rothschild ft Sons. Paris— >lc«r>. ilo Holhiwhllil Frorcn. Berlin — 
Inreollon der Dlsconlo Oeaellachaft. China. .Tmmn. and Eaat Indie*— <1>ar- 
tered Bank of India. Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand— The 
Union Bank of Australia, Ltd.. and Bank of New Zealand. 

Letters of credit Issued, available In all parts of the world. 

Wells Fargo Zc Go. Bank 

N. E. Cos. San-home and .Sutter Sts. 
JOHN J. VALENTINE, President H. WADSWORTH. Cashier 

HOMER 3. KINO. Manager F. L. LD7MAN. Assistant Cashier 

IT. L. MILLER, Second Assistant Cashier. 

Capital. Surplus and Undivided Profits Dec. 31.1900 Is. 020.223. 88 

Branches— New York City. H. B. Parsons. Cashier: Salt Lake City. J. E. 
Dooly. Cashier: Portland, Or., R. Lea Barnes, Cashier. 
DIRECTORS— John J. Valentine. Andrew ChrlBteson. Oliver Eldrldge. 
Henry E. Huntington. Homer 9. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook 
John Bermlngham, Dudley Evans. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 82,290.159.05 

Capital actually paid up in Cash 1,000.000 00 

Deposits June 29. 1901 -- 59,886.288.11 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President, B. A. Becker; First Vice-President 
Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President. H. Horstman; Cashier, A. II. K 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary. George Tourny 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller; General Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

Ign. SMnhart, E. Route H. B. Rusa, N. Ohlandt, John Lloyd, and I. N, 
Walter. 

/Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St.. below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital 81,000,000. Paid Up Capital $300,000 

James D. Phelan, President S. G, Murphy, Vice-President 

George A. Story, Cashier. John A. Hooper, Vice-President 

C. B. Hobson, Assistant Cashier. 

DLRECTORS— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, James 
Moffitt. Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Chas. S. Neal, James M. 
McDonald. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange ob 
city banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

532 CALIFORNIA STREET, S. F. 

Deposits Jan 1, 1901... 827,881,798 Reserve Fund 8223.4&1 

Paid-up Capital 1,000,000 Contingent Fund 464,847 

E. B. POND, President W. O. B. DeFREMERY, Vice-President 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier R. M. WELCH. Assistant Cashier 

Directors— Henry F. Allen, Thomas Magee, W. C. B. de Fremery, C. O 
G. Miller, Robert Watt, George C. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin, Jacob 
Barth, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms and farming 
lands 1 n the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be mode in checks payable 
In San Francisco, Post Office, or Wells Fargo &, Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge la made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 3 p. m., and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only, 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

Continental Building X Loan Association 

Established in 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 
Subscribed Capltal.,812,000,000 Profit and Reaerve Fund...8250,000 
Paid-in-Capital 2,000,000 Monthly Income, over 100,000 

Its Purpose ib to help Its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on improved property, the members giving first liens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help its Stockholdera to earn 8 to 12 per cent, per annum on their stock 
and allow them to open deposit accounts bearing interest at the rate of 5 
per cent, per annum. 

Home Office— 222 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Wm. Coebin, General Manager 

Crocker- Wool worth National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Corner Market. Montgomery and Post Sts. 

Paid-up-Capital 81,000 000 

Wm. H. Crocker, President Geo. W. Klinb, Cashier 

O. E. Green, Vice-President W. Gregg. Jr., Assistant Cashier 

Directors— W. H. Crocker, E. B Pond, George Crocker, O. E. Green, G. W. 
Kline. Henry J. Crocker. G. W. Scott. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 27, 1901. 




^■&;/-r f f-:Wdrl 



s^saia-,- 



murance 




Mr. Henry K. Gortei' has invented an improved water- 
tower, which was recently tried and tested before the Board 
of Fire Commissioners. The tower and extension are both 
worked by hydraulic pressure, and at its maximum extension 
it threw a horizontal stream seventy-seven feet without any 
appreciable vibration. 

* * * 

"The two most calamitous fires ever known anywhere in 
the world occurred in the United States within thirteen 
months of each other. In the first of these, in Chicago, on 
October Sth and 9th, 1871, the property lost was $200,000,000, 
and in the second, in Boston, on November 9th, 1872, 
$80,000,000 of property was consumed. In Chicago 100,000 
persons were left without homes and 200 were killed. 
Chicago's heads the list of the world's destructive confla- 
grations, but, as she had over 300,000 population in 1871. 
the loss in Jacksonville in 1901, with 28,000 population, is 
proportionately not very far below that of the metropolis 
on Lake Michigan." 

* • • 

Mr. Douglas Wight, assignee, "Missouri Town Mutual Fire 
Ins. Co.," Nevada, Mo., reports that he has made final settle- 
ment of the affairs of this company, and was discharged by 
order of the circuit court March 2, 1901. He reports that he 
collected of the assets of the company about $1,775; that the 
allowed claims against the company amounted to about 
$10,000, on which about 9 per cent was paid. 

This is not by any means an unusual case; in fact, nine 
per cent is a fairly good dividend, and proves the receiver 
to be a man above small things or careless of them. Mutu- 
ality in fire insurance is a theory, and the theory is con- 
stantly being demolished by attempts to put it in practice. 
The only good that tne careful observer can note arising 
from this class of insurance is that it is a school for fools, 
whose only virtue is that they pay unknowingly the tuition 
fees. Instead of legislating to make the mutuals safe, it 
is almost a certainty that the best way to rid the insurance 
field of them would be to let them alone, and when they 
had buncoed the people sufficiently the people would retaliate 
by leaving them alone. 

* * * 

Mr. J. T. Dargan, late Southern States manager of the Im- 
perial, issued a circular to his agents after the severance of 
his connections with the company. The company evidently 
does not like it, and retaliates by the following; "The Im- 
perial win be more than glad to have its representatives 
address it personally, when this company will be pleased 
to submit such evidence to them as will show ample justifi- 
cation for its action in terminating its connection with Mr. 
Dargan. The company requests that its loyal agents treat 
this circular for what it is worth, and do not allow them- 
selves to be parties to an underhanded and futile attempt to 
damage its plant in the Southern States." 

* * * 

The Fire Underwriters are now thinking a little more about 
the conflagration hazard. It is to be hoped that the move- 
ment will not stop at thinking, but will go on as far as rating 
and wind up in application. If any city on earth should 
be charged for conflagration hazard it is San Francisco. 

* * * 

The Indemnity Fire of New York is admitted and licensed 
to do business in California, with Mr. W. H. Lowden as gen- 
eral agent. The Indemnity was organized in 189S, with paid- 
up capital of $200,000. 

* * * 

The Magdeburg has reinsured its own and its tenders 
United States business in the Springfield Fire and Marine. 
Gutte &. Frank have been managers for the Pacific Coast 
for over twenty years, and the loss of this company will be 
serious to their interests. Mr. George Dornin is Pacific 
Coast manager of the Springfield. It is said that one of the 




DBCEUS6 it isn't mounted on 
THE IMPROVED 

HARTSHORN 

SHADE ROLLER. 

^ A perfect nrtlclo. No tacks re- 
*T quired. Notice name on roller 
la ^ when uuylng jour shades. 



managing directors of the Magdeburg is on his way to this 
city to close up the business. This disease of reinsuring 
among the German companies seems to be epidemic. Maybe 
it will spread to other nationalities. 



The Lascelles family, the head of which is the Earl of 
Harewood, has had an unusual run of misfortune lately. 
A few weeks ago the Hon. Francis John Lascelles, half- 
brother of the Earl, shot and killed his Chinese cook at a 
ranch in British Columbia. Owing to the fact that he was 
on the verge of delirium tremens he escaped prosecution, 
but was ordered confined in an insane asylum. Hardly had 
ihe doors of this institution closed upon him before the 
news arrived that his brother, the Hon. Eric James, who had 
adopted the life of a traveling showman, had been found 
dead with his caravan, and the coroner's jury which sat 
on the case said death was due to epileptic fits, accelerated 
by excessive drinking. The family seats, Harewood House, 
near Leeds and Goldsiiorough Hall at Knaresborough. will be 
lemembered by all traveled Americans who have taken in 
the Harrogate wells on their tour. Harewood House and 
t'.emesne are never overlooked by visitors who may be in the 
vicinity, as it is one of the "stately homes of England," 
about which so much has been written. The Lascelles fam- 
ily is connected by marriage with many of the noble houses 
of the kingdom, and the present Countess of Desart is a 
sister of the unfortunate men. The Hon. Erie james trav- 
eled in the show business under the name of Erie Leith. 



Former patients of Dr. G. E. Sussdorff, the physican and 
surgeon, will be glad to learn that he has resumed the prac- 
tice of his profession. He has fitted up offices in the Phelan 
Building, Room 22, with hours from ten to twelve and two 
to four. 



The best people in town go to Zinkand's, attracted by 

the good music, exceptional cuisine, and perfect service. 
Society people make it their headquarters, and are fond of 
gathering there after the theatre. 

St. Louis A. B. C. Bohemian, the king of all bottled 

beers, brewed from the finest Canadian Barley and imported 
Bohemian Hops. 



If you want the best lunch in town go to the Grand Ho- 
tel Cafe, where lunch is served every day from 11 to 2. Fay 
& Foster, the proprietors, know just what business and cjub 
men want. 




There is one whiskey that always lives up toils reputation and that 

is Jesse Moore. 

Pacific coast Oepaatucm 

G. M.WARD, 

Manager, 

337 PINE STREET, 
INSURANCE COMPANY Sar. Francisco, Ca 

of ramEPORT Phone. Main 5509. 

New Amsterdam Casualty Company 

of New York 

405 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Edmund F. Gkeen, Manager. Jesse W. Lilienthai, Attorney. 

Employers' Liability, Acoldent, Burglary and Salary Insurance. 

Fire Association, of Philadelphia 
Philadelphia Underwriters, of Philadelphia 

PENN 
J. M. BECK, Manager 
219 Sansomo streot, San Francisco, Cal. 



July 2/, 1901. 



ftAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



19 



OBITUARY. 

Mr. William Clayton Pickengill, C. B.. ConSui-G 
C.rrat Britain for th. .mi Urritoiiea, died In 

Alameda on Saturday last from th.' aflactl of fever con 

1 .lurinK a r.si.lenrc of many years on the \ 
coast. It Is bartly two | Mr. Plckereftll 

to this Coast. t>nt during this period he made many Mends 
who appreciated his sterlins worth end ntiility for tl 
lion he was called upon to fill. He was born In Lancashire, 
in 1S»K. ami went to Madagascar In early life as agent for 
tnc London Missionary Society, He acted as Interprets 
for the Malagasy Embassy when It visited London and the 
t nlteil States, and it was upon that occasion his ability 
attracted the attention of the foreign Office, which shortly 
after appointed him vice-Consul at Antan -anariro. On June 
1883. he was gazetted a C. B. for distinguished sen:. 
the civil order, and on May 26, 1892, he was appointed 
Consul to Portuguese possessions in West Africa, and later 
^Consul to the Independent State of Congo, where he re- 
mained until September, 1898, when he was appointed Con- 
sul General for California. Nevada, and for the territory of 
I'tah and Arizona, he has been ill ever since he came here 
from periodical attacks of the "coast fever." He leaves a 
widow and four sons. He was interred at Tamalpais Ceme- 
tery, in Marin County, on Sunday last, with official honors, 
the full Consular Corps attending in a body. 

Ex-Mayor L. R. Ellert died at bis home in San Francisco 
Sunday, at the age of forty-four. He was attacked by Blight's 
disease about six months ago, and went to different parts 
of the State in attempts to restore his health. It was found 
useless though, and a week before his death he was brought 
back to San Francisco. 

Mr. Ellert was a native of San Francisco, and had a suc- 
cessful career. He began life as a druggist. Later he en- 
tered politics, and in 1888 was elected a Supervisor on the 
Republican ticket. Two years later he was re-elected. In 
1892 he was elected Mayor of San Francisco on the Non-Par- 
tisan ticket, and served one term. While Mayor he studied 
law and was admitted to the bar. After his retirement 
from office he formed a law partnership with Mr. Geo. 
D. Squires, which continued up to the time of his death. He 
was connected with several business firms, and prominent 
in the financial world. A wife and a sixteen year old son, 
Arthur Ellert, survive him. 

The funeral took place Tuesday from Masonic Temple 
under the auspices of the Masons, of which organization Mr. 
Ellert was a member. 

Mr. Robert D. Grayson, the well-known business and club- 
man, died last Saturday of heart disease. His body was 
lound by his father, Mr. George W. Grayson, at his rooms, 
393 Geary stret. Though the deceased was under treatment 
for heart trouble he had been in the best of health and 
spiritj the day before, and his death was a surprise. Mr. 
Grayson was thirty-five years of age and a native of Red 
Bluff. He was educated in San Francisco and at Harvard, 
and for the last ten years has been associated with his 
brother-in-law, Mr. William C. Ralston, in the mining busi- 
ness. He was a member of the Elks Lodge and the Pacific 
Union Club, in both of which he was very popular. His 
father, mother, and two sisters, Mrs. Harry Hinckley and 
Mrs. W. C. Ralston, survive him. 



INSURANCE. 



You can have a clear, beautiful complexion by using 

Camelline. Used and endorsed by Mrs. Terry, Mrs. Kendall, 
Adelina Patti and other notables. It is the very best protec- 
tion against the effects of the wind and sun. 



Techau Tavern is society's recognized gathering place 

after the theatre. An orchestra plays every evening. The 
best food and wines, and unexcelled service. 



St. Louis A. B. C. Bohemian, the king of all bottled 

beers, brewed from the finest Canadian Barley and imported 
Bohemian Hops. 



If your doctor prescribes whiskey, order Jesse Moore every time. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 610 Montgomery street, 

San Francisco, deals in all kinds of newspaper information, 
business, personal, political, from press of State, Coast, and 
country Tel. Mala 1042. 



FIRE, MARINE. AND INLAND INSURANCE 



FIREMANS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Capital $1,000,000 Assets, $4,000,000 
PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 



OP LONDON ENGLAND 



C F. MULLINS, Manager. 4l6-|l8 California, ritreol. A F. 
FIRE INSURANCE 



Founded A. D. 1792 

Insurance Oompany of / lorth A 



merica 



OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital $3,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 85.022.016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Aeent, 412 California street. S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720 
Capital Paid Up. S3.446.10O Assets. 824,662 048 35 

Surplus to Policy Holders, t8.930.431.41. Losses Paid Over, 1184,000.000.00 

PACIFIC COAST BRANCH: 

601 Montgomery street. 
FRANK W. DICKSON, Manager 
HERMANN NATHAN & PAUL F. KINGSTON, Local Managers. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New Zealand Insurance Gompany 

OF New Zealand 
Capital, $5,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office in company's bulldlne. 312 California street 

W. P. THOMAS, Manager 
Hooker & Lent, City Agents, 14 Post street 

Phoenix Assurance Co., of London 

Established 1782 

Providence-Washington Insurance Gompany 

Incorporated 1799 



BUTLER & HEWITT. General Agents 



413 California street. S. F. 



Connecticut Fire Insurance Go. 

OF HARTFORD 

Cash Capital 81.000.000.00 

Cash Assets 4,081,895.13 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,092,661.01 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manaeer 
COLIN M. BOYD, San Francisco agent, 411 California street. 

Br.tish and Foreign Marine Insurance Go. 

(Limited) OF LIVERPOOL 

Capital ■• 86,700.000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents 316 California street, S. F 

The Thuringia Insurance Gompany 

of ERFURT, GERMANY 
Capital. 82,250,000 Assets, 810,984,248 

VOSS, CONRAD A CO., General Manage 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome street, S. F. 



North German Fire Insurance Gompany 

of Hamburg, Germany 
N. Schlesslnger, City Agent. 304 Montgomery St., S. 7. 



ANDERSON SPRINGS. 

Only natural Mineral Steam Baths in 

LAKE COUNTY. 
Hot Sulphur and Iron Baths. 
Board: $10 to $14 per week. 
Baths free. Address, 

J. ANDERSON, Anderson Springs, Middletown, 
Lake County, California. 

Fare, San Francisco to Springs and return reduced 
to $8. Send for circular. 
Full particulars at S. F. News Letter, 5</z Kearny St., S. F. 

HOBERG'S RESORT. 

Pleasantly located in a pine forest three thousand 
five hundred feet altitude; highest elevation, low- 
est price. First-class family table and pleasant 

rooms, eight dollars per week. 
Surrounding scenery unsurpassed by any springs 
in the immediate vicinity. Stage dally. Buy tickets 
direct for Hoberg's, Lake County, California. 

George Kammerer and Mrs. M. Hoberg, Proprietors. 

Full particulars at S. F. News Letter office. 

HOTEL BENVENUE AND COTTAGES. 

LAKEPORT, CAL. 
LAKEPORT'S SUMMER RESORT. Situated overlooking 
the shore on Clear Lake. New pavilion, boathouse, and bowl- 
ing alley. Open all the year. Special facilities for accommo- 
dating families with children; home cooking; boating, bath- 
ing, hunting, and superior Ashing. Lovely drives and walks. 
Rates: $7 per week. 

FRANK & A. M. SCALES, Proprietors. 

LAUREL DELL LAKE 

LAKE COUNTY. 
THE ORIGINAL SWITZERLAND OF AMERICA. 

Fishing, Hunting, Boating, (new boats) Tennis, Bowling 
Alley, Dancing and Music, best and largest dance hall In 
Lake County, beautiful drives and walks, new and first class 
livery Largest dining room in Lake County, built over lake. 
Cottages. 

Under new management. Address, 

EDGAR DURNAN, 
Laurel Dell, Lake County, Cal. 



Blue 



CYPRESS VILLA. 



B STREET, San Rafael, near Narrow Gauge. 

NOW OPEN. This favorite resort has been newly 
furnished and has undergone an entire renovation. 
For families, tourists, and the public generally, the 
accommodations are unexcelled. Board by day 
week or month. New management. 

MRS. WARBURTON, Proprietor. 



DUNCAN SPRINGS. 

HOPLAND, CAL. 
Lovely drive of two miles from station to hotel 
Terms: $10 to $12. Best medicinal waters in the 
State. Housekeeping cottages to rent. 
O. HOWELL, Hopland, Cal. 



FARAISO HOT SPRINGS. 

The Carlsbad of America 

Open Winter and Summer 



Monterey County, Cal. 

F. W. Schroeder, Manager. 



C. T. Romle, Proprietor 



THE SWITZERLAND OF AMERICA. 
Boating (new boats), bathing, fishing and 
hunting. Dancing and music every even- 
ing except Sundays. Best dance hall in 
Lake County. Fine table; only white 
cooks employed. Send for new pamphlet 

O. WEISMAN, Midlake P. O., Lake County, Cal. 



Lakes 



SKAGGS' HOT SPRINGS. 



Sonoma County, only 4% hours from San Francisco; but 9 miles 
staging: waters noted for medicinal virtues; best natural bath 'n 
State; enod trout stream^; telephone, telegraph, daily mail and «x» 
press; i rst-class hotel and stage service; morning and aftemot n 
stages. Round trip from San Francisco, only $5-50. Take Tiburou 
ferry at 7.30 a. m. or 3.3 ■ p. m. Terms. 82 per day or 812 per week. 
References; Any guest of 'be past tix years. For further informa- 
tion address 

J. F. MULGREW, Proprietor. 

SKAGGS. GAL. 



HOWARD SPRINGS. 



picturesquely situated amidst the pine forests of Lake County — the 
Switzerland of America. Elevation 2300 feet; no fog; c imate perfect. 
.Natural hot mineral plunge and tub baths, tine medicinal drinking 
water. Excellent fishing and hunting. Telephone on premises. 
Rates. 810 and $12, with special terms for families. Ac- 
comodations, table and service first-class. Round trip from San 
Francisco, via Napa, Caiistoga. 810, including fine stage drive. 
For accommodations and further particulars address 

MRS. R. J. BEEBY, Proprietor. 

HOTEL MOUNT VIEW. 

CHANGED HANDS. Will hereafter be open the year 
round. Bus meets 9.30 and 11 o'clock trains from city at 
present. Th* culinary department will receive special 
atteniion. For rates and particulars address, 

Hotel Mount View, Ross Valley, Marin County, Cal. 

PACIFIC CONGRESS SPRINGS. 

An ideal spot in the Santa Cruz Mountains. Two hours 
from San Francisco. Five miles from Los Gatos. No 
tiresome staging. Delightful climate. Mineral water 
and table unsurpassed. Boating, swimming and fishing 
and all out-door sports. One of the best tennis courts 
on the Coast. Entire new management. 

A. S. OLNEY, Manager. 

THE GARDEN CITY SANITARIUM. 

Thoroughly Equipped with all modern appliances. X-ray. All 
forms water treatment, the finest Static Galvanic Sinusoidal and Faradic 
Electrical apparatus. A Corps of well-trained nurses of both sexes 
skilled in all forms of treatments and manipulations Rest Cure scjentlfic- 
cally carried out. * * • * A quiet home-like place, beautiful scenery 
Mount Hamilton and the famous Lick Observatory in plain view; one 
block from electric cars, fifteen minutes walk from the center of the city 
Terms 810 to 820 per week, including medical attention and regular treat 
ment- 

Garden City Sanitarium, East San Jose, Cal. 



GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL. 

Felton, Santa Cruz County, Cal. 
A. J. GASS, Proprietor. 



Six miles from Santa Cruz, 
and % mile from big tr- es. 
Bub meets all trains. Terms 

reasonable. 



HOTEL KNICKERBOCKER 



VAN NESS AVENUE, 
San Francisco. 



BLITHEDALE 

Mill Valley, Cal. 



J. A. ROBINSON. 



CALISTOGA & CLEAR LAKE STAGE LINE 

Direct to Harbin. Anderson, Adams, Howard, Astorg, 
Glenbrook, Hoburgsand Selglers Springs. Teams and sad- 
dle horses, etc. Write 

WM. SPIERS, Caiistoga. 



July 27, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



21 




— 



imbeams 



_ _ 



Stolen From Thieve*. 



Mrs. Howler — Asbury, that was a most excellent sermon 
yon preached on "vanity" this morning. Rev. Howler — Well, 
I think, my dear, that I can flatter myself that there are very 
few men in this universe who could have done better. 

Teacher — Now. Tommy, suppose you had two apples, and 
you gave another boy his choice of them, you would tell 
him to take the bigger one. wouldn't you? Tommy — Xo. 
mum. Teacher — Why? Tommy — Cos 'twouldn't be neces- 
sary. 

Nervous Lady Passenger (to deck hand) — Have you ever 
seen any worse weather than this, Mister Sailor? Deck 
Hand — Take a word from a old salt, mum; the weather's 
never very bad while there's any females on deck a-makin' 
henquiries about it. 

Mrs. Hashley — Your friend was at the Exposition? I 
suppose he saw many rare and curious things? The Boarder 
— Yes, ma'am. He says he had an excellent cup of coffee. 

Uncle — Now, Tommy, I'll give you a shilling if you can tell 
me how many queens England has had. Tommy— Four. 
Uncle — Enumerate them. Tommy — One, two, three and four. 

Charles Loveday — Um, ah. Er, er — er! Er — ! he! he! 
Jeweler (to his assistant) — Bring that tray of engagement- 
rings here, Henry. 

"How did Spudkins get his appointment as brigadier- 
general? I never knew that he was connected with the 
army." "Oh, yes, by marriage; his brother-in-law is a 
United States Senator." 

Mrs. Gaswell — The Czar of Russia has four daughters. Mr. 
Gaswell — Oh, the dear little Czardines! 

"Paw," said little Willie Gittit, "give me ten cents to buy 
a story-book with." "Ten cents," shrieked the old gentle- 
man. "Do you think I am Andy Carnegie?" 



Mothers, be Bure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing 

syrup" for your children while teething. 



HARBIN SPRINGS 

The Most Accessible and Most Desirable In Lake County. 

Contain Sulphur, Iron, Magnesia, and Arsenic. 
Open the Year Round. Hotel. Cofcfcaees and Grounds Lighted 
with Acetylene Gas. Wonderful cures of -rheumatism, gout, 
dyspepsia, catarrh, paralyst". neuralgia, dropsy, blood poison- 
ing, skin diseases, kidney, liver and stomach troubles. A Nat- 
ural Mineral or Medicated Mud Rath has just been discovered; 
nothing like it known. Don't Miss Harbin Springs During May 
and June. The most delightful months in the year. Absolutely 
free from mosquitoes. Perfect olimate; no excessive heat: fin- 
est vegetable garden in the State. Perfectly equipped livery 
stable in connection with hotel. Home dairy. Popular amuse- 
ments. Twohard-finished cottages just completed. ONLY SIX 
HOURS from San Francisco. Stage daily from Caliptoga to 
Springs. Round-trip tickets at S. P, office, $8. Fine hunting and 
fishing-. Rates reasonable- Long distance telephone. 
J. A. HAYS, Proprietor. 

CALIFORNIA HOT SPRINGS 

Hot springs, but not a sanitarium. Formerly AguaCaliente Springs, Sonoma 
Valley. No staging; 46 miles via C. N. Railway or S. P. R. R. Immense 
swimming tank. Splendid table. Come Sundays— try it. Round trip, 
$1.10. Telephone. Expensive improvements. $12 and $14. 

COOPER & SHEDDEN, Agua Caliente, Cal. 

GIBBS RESORT 

In the Santa Cruz Mountains 

Hotel, cabins, camp ground, Redwood groves. Fishing, shoot- 
ing. Cream, milk, poultry, and fresh fruit in abundance. One 
of the most healthful and picturesque resorts in the mountains. 
A. W. J. GIBBS, Proprietor, 
GIBBS, 
Santa Cruz Co., Cal. 

PARK HOUSE Ben Lomond, Cal. 

Pleasant surroundings, beautiful scenery, good table, fish- 
ing, and fine drives. MRS. I. N. HAYES. 



r^^mrjEMgESORTSq^^f^ 



HOTEL VENDOME. SAN JOSE, CAL 

One of California's most attractive resorts. The start- 
ing point for Lick Observatory. The center of an 
orchard section of unparalleled beauty, through which 
finely graded and watered roads, for cycling and driv- 
ing, lead in every direction. The most thoroughly-kt pt 
and up-to-date hotel in Central California. 

For further information call at Traveler office, 20 
Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., or address 

GEO. P. SNELL, Manager. 



Arlington Hotel 



SANTA BARBARA 




The finest summer climate in the State. Sea bathing 
every day in the year. The best green turf golf links 
in California; five minutes' street car ride from the 
hotel. Special low rates during the summer. 

E. P. DUNN, Proprietor. 



Arcadia 

CAMPUS STATION 

Santa Cruz Mountains 

Delightfully located, 
half a mile from 
Big Trees. New 
hotel newly fur- 
nished. Electric 
lighted. Hot and 
cold water. Porce- 
lain tubs. 

BATHING, FISHING, HUNTING, TENNIS, Etc. 

Address THOMAS L. BELL, Felton P. O. 



HOTEL ROWARDENNAN 

Located in the Santa Gruz Mountains. 

9 miles from Santa Cruz. Round-Trip tickets 

from San Francisco, $3.00. 

Everything first-class. Over . Ten Thousand 

Dollars spent in improvements this year. 

Headquarters for parties going into the Big 

Basin. Good livery. Competent drivers. 

Write for booklet to B. DICKINSON, Lessee, 

Ben Lomond, Cal. 



HOTEL EL MONTE Los Gatos - Cal - 

John Nevill, Proprietor. 
American Plan. Strictly first-class. 



HOLLY OAKS 

SAUSALITO, CAL. 

Rates from $10 
per week upward. 

MRS. M. A. FARRAR, 

Proprietor. 




22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 27, 1901. 



CLOTHES THAT TALK. 



By Mrs. Chauncey DeWit. 

This is the mid-season, when the fashionable dressmakers' 
shops are practically closed. The half-dozen modistes who 
are elbowing each other at the top of the ladder have sent 
out notices of their departure East or Europeward in search 
of fol de rols for the coming season. They'll have their 
high-priced European novelties for their excmsive cus- 
tomers, but the chances are they were purchased from the 
agents in New York. Few of the modistes really cross the 
pond, for it doesn't pay. I know of one very swell modiste 
who took a flying trip to New York, and then hied to the 
wilds of Amador County, where she could rest in peace and 
economy. An extra layer of French accent left no doubt 
on her customers' minds that she had been conning the 
fashions of Paris for their benefit. 

For a' that, some unusually stunning gowns have been 
fashioned by the cunning hands that control the destiny of 
our make-up. The best modistes have all turned out "good- 
ness gracious!" and "oh, my!" gowns that redound to their 
credit — financially as well as otherwise. A forecast by a 
prophetess promises many innovations for the winter sea- 
son, but sufficient to the day is the "devil" thereof. 

Fancy tailor gowns have given the cue for gayer street 
gowns than were ever attempted before. Society women 
of the most exquisite taste still insist on quiet colors and 
simple gowns for down-town wear. But there are others 
to whom the din of colors is sweetest music. The Hopkins- 
Taylors are usually perambulating rainbows. Helen, Edna, 
Georgie and Frances Hopkins are always a vivid splash in 
the haunts of the shoppers. Their clothes are so much, 
gayer than others of their ilk that they clamor for attention. 
These girls spend slathers of money on their clothes, but 
they really ought to draw finer lines between street and 
house gowns. I saw Mrs. Gus Taylor down town the other 
morning in a black gown that, despite its sombre hue, could 
not serve as an eye-blinker for the screechy hosiery, flippant 
petticoat, and gaudy waist that flaunted under the black 
Eton. A chiffon boa of variegated hue and a gay chapeau 
completed the costume. Mrs. Taylor ought to remember 
that on the street, at least, clothes should be seen and not 
heard. 

Apropos of hats, the gospel of head-gear is understood by 
few milliners, much less by the women who must wear their 
mistakes. The woman who knows how to put on a hat or 
bonnet is a rara avis — the milliners who know how a hat 
or bonnet should fit the head are minus quantities. If a 
chapeau flops on her head at any old angle the average 
woman is content. It does not occur to her that the hat 
might be made to fit her particular head. She travels 
through the changing season serenely unconscious that her 
head-piece tilts boozily or perches on her top-knot in a 
dizzy fashion. Most women have not the slightest idea of 
the sacred relationship that ought to exist between the 
hat crown and the head. The eternal fitness of things has 
joined together what most milliners dare to put asunder. 
No hat can be becoming if the crown usurps more than the 
proper head space; still more disfiguring is it to the lines 
of the head and face when the crown is too small for the 
head. There should never be any space left between the 
lower edge of the hat crown and the hair. When it is 
done without malice aforethought, but to achieve a certain 
mode — as hats turned up at the side or back — Bowers, 
foliage, feathers or ribbon are employed to hide the unbe- 
coming space. 

When a woman is in the youth of old age a bonnet is un- 
questionably the proper thing. A scribe who dips her pen 
in the fountain of fashion dilates thus on the subject: "With 
bonnets two things must be observed. The first should be 
taken for granted — that it fits the head properly. Then the 
hair must be dressed in accordance with the lines of the 
bonnet, and where that is not practical, arrange some addi- 
tions in the back, which will put the bonnet line in harmony 
with the hair as seen from all sides. A tab, a bow or rosette, 
the lowering of a flower or feather, will work a magical 
change. Frenchwomen are all most critical on such points, 
no matter of what age. They are educated up to their 
very expressive word, coiffure — a head-dress — and that a 



bonnet or hat should be a head-dress for each particular 
head is toe first and last commandment of French millinery. 
We remain too crude in this respect, and allow our milliners 
in general to ignore altogether that different heaas, in shape 
and size, require separate and individual fitting. When hats 
are bought, and not ordered, alterations to suit the pur- 
chaser's head should be insisted upon. Having once found 
the proper head line on which the hat or bonnet should 
rest, and realized the becomingness of it as well as the 
graceful harmony given the whole figure, no woman will 
ever return to the perching system now so universal." 



Baby's Diary. 
A unique and handsome publication wherein to record the 
important events in baby's life has just been issued by Bor- 
den's Condensed Milk Co., 71 Hudson St., New York. It is 
not given away, but is sent on receipt of 10 cents. 



Argonaut Whisky is a good thing to take into the 

country with you. In [act, you can't get any better. It is 
absolutely the acme of good liquor. The best bars in town 
keep it, and the demand is constant from those who are par- 
ticular what they drink. E. Martin & Co., 54 First street, 
are the sole agents for the United States. 



Flavored and seasoned in wood, rich and elceant with Ihe best materials 
used by distillers, It is no wonder that Jesse Moore Is the leadine whiskey 
in the world. 



St. Louis A. B. C. Bohemian, the king of all bottled 

beers, brewed from the finest Canadian Barley and imported 
Bohemian Hops. 



Modern Education. — A school teacher in Sheffield received 
the following from a complaining parent a few days ago. 
"Sir — Will you please for the future give my boy sum easier 
somes to do at nites. This is what he brought hoam to or 
three nites back: 'If for gallons of bere will fill thirty-to pint 
bottles, how many pint and a half bottles will nine-gallins 
fill?' Well, we tried, and could make nothing of it at all; 
and my boy cried and sed he didn't dare go back in the morn- 
ing without doin' it. So I had to go an buy a nine-gallin 
cask of bere. which I could ill afford to do, and then we went 
and borrowed a lot of wine and brandy bottles, besides a 
few we had by us. Well, we emptied the cask into the bottles 
and then counted them, and there were 19, and my boy put 
the number down for an answer. I don't know whether it 
is rite or not as we spilt sum while doin' it. P. S. — Please 
let the next sum be water, as I am not able to buy any more 
bere." 




The Music of our Churches 

would be greatly improved if more 
organists and singers knew the 
methods of the 

Conservatory 

OF MUSIC 

We will send to any one Inter- 
ested an illustrated catalogue and 
all particulars relating to our School 
of Music and Elocution. 

George W. Chadwick, Mus. Direc. 
AddrcS! .ill correspondence to 
FRANK W. HALE, Geo. Man., Boston, Mau. 



MRS.M. E. PERLEY 



TELEPHONE GRANT 4 



KERA/VHC STUDIO t^^T^'* **^ 

Instruetions In CHINA PAINTING 

Keramlc Roman Gold, $1.00 per box. 

Agent lor Revelation Kiln. 209 A POST ST., S. F. 

a CCOUNTANT, Cashier, Correspondent, 27; Competent 
and Experienced Office flanager; Absolutely Highest 

Endorsements. 

E. H. W. 

Address S. F. News Letter. 



July 27, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'W Rose 




THE TWO BROTHERS, 
w Dorte, M. D . h. I ipptnootlfe 
This i* Obllrlon'a throne. Upon Its 

Death clftspfl his younger brother, laying b 

Ringed with dark curls ai p'a fairer grace. 

Ye weary ones, Death more ■« 

Bleep opes hit. eyea the wan pale Heht to 

That halos his dark bride, Night, from his embrace; 

His warm deslrea the halting hours outpace 
Till he shall smite her palms and kiss bet feet. 
But in those hours what toil! His brother, Death, 

Salutes for all time his sweet consort. R 
Sleeps bride is fickle — gone with morning's breath: 

Death leans forever on a faithful breast. 
I babbles lies in dreams: whilst Death, forsooth. 
Shuts close his lips and ever guards the truth. 



CONCERNING ONE. 
IL. Frank Tooker. in Century Mairn/inc. 

Had she any dower 

When she came? 
Yes: her face was like a flower. 

And her soul was free from blame. 

On her cheeks a rose-leaf flame 
Ever fluttered. When she spoke, 
Then for me the morning broke. 

Wore she any crown 

When she died? 
All the earth seemed sodden brown, 

Though 't was June; and children cried. 

And placed flowers at her side; 
And the paths that once she trod 

Seemed the stepping-stones to God. 



AN OPTIMIST. 
(Lulu W. Mitchell, Century MasrazineJ 

Shall I, by Life's most commonplaces hedged, 
Misrate the casual sunbeam, or, austere, 
Regard the wildflower pale, chance-rooted here. 
Scorning the song-bird this dull thicket fledged? 

Nay! Heart's-ease, Fortune, I have never pledged, 
A hostage for thy favor ail too dear. 
Ah. Heaven's light downshineth strangely near, 
When outward view hath long been casement-edged. 

Though grim mischance with evil hour conspire, 
The balanced soul they shall not oversway, 
Nor circumstance abash, nor failure bar. 

They vex me not, the lamps of old desire, 
Unlighted in the bare room of To-day. 
Somewhere the morning waits! Meanwhile — a star. 



GOLD. 

(St. Louis Mirror.) 
There is a gold unlocked by miser's key 

And gold is found in lees of sparkling wine; 

And there is gold along the swaying vine 
Where yellow, half-blown roses dropping he; 
Gold to spare among the sands at sea 

And gold deep-digged from many a hidden mine, 
And golden leaves upon the willow tree. 
But all this aureate glitter is for naught 

When I in dreamful mood, my love behold, 

Crowned with her tangled locks of tawny gold 
Like corn-silk in the breeze's meshes caught; 

None other gold may match it, none so fair, 

As that which gathers in a woman's hair. 



SHAKE INTO YOUR SHOES 

Allen 1 * K<>"!'K»»*». . now.lcr 11 furr. rainlul. m at ti n g . I MHU I M f— I 
..nH InVTOwtns mUlA, Rlvl In.lAntlr l»kr« 111* "line Hid Inin- 

iv "I |he »c. Mini'* ToM-Ram 
make* llifltl >.r urn .h.>»-« l.ol <•••>■. It I- * I 

Mm. . Itrc.l. ii.liliitf Icrt Trv II by nil 'Iniffgl.t. an. I 

tall lot 2.V in ntaniiifl Trial |.ack*vo PKKK. A.MroM, 
II. iy. N. Y. 



WOMEN. 

Of such a woman it may well be said 

She has a graceful carriage; or is fair; 

And of another she has golden hair 
And praise the poise and beauty of her head; 
Some women may be witty and well read, 

And some may charm by throat and bosoms hare. 

All are Eve's daughters, all her power share 
To conquer man and lead him by a thread. 
But more than seeming grace or outward sign 

Of loveliness that, like a flower, is seen, 
Is what she keeps shrined sacred and apart — 
Some glow of soul, like sparkle in the wine, 

Some shadowy look, like Autumn pool serene, 
The reflex of the pureness of her heart. 




FELIX'S ROTISSER1E, 

Felix Unuailnardoti. proprietor, (formerly with 

Jack's Kolisserie), 587 California street, below 

Kearny. Private rooms for families and banquets 

Telephone Black 2906 



Gray Bros. 



'^2S MiiiitH'inuTy Htrt'cl. Sun Francisco. 
206 New Illifh Street, Lofl Angles. 



Concrete and artificial 
stone work. 



Murphy, Grant & Co., 



Agents lor tb© 



(Formerly in Mills Building 



BALTIMORE 

MT. VERNON-WOODBERRY COTTON DUCK CO. 

Importers of Staple and Fancy Dry Goods. Manufacturers ol furnishing 
(roods. Patentees and sole manufacturers of The " Never*Rip " Overall. 
i The best in the world. 

Full Line of Spring Goods 

J. R. SMITH 
Tailoring Co., 

310 Bush St., under Russ House, S. F. 

Joseph Gillott's Steel Pens, TBB AWA *gkfJ AQ0 .ws 

"Grand Prix" Paris, 1900. The Highest Possible 
Award- These pens are *' the best in the world." 
Sole agent for the United Statep. 
Mb. Henet Hob, 91 John street. New York. 
Sold by all stationers. 

A. B. TREADWELL Attorney-at-Uiw 

(Formerly Judge Police Court No. i) 
HAS RESUMED PRACTICE at 633 Kearny St.. cor. Sacramento St. 

Al legal business attendedto promptly. 

Samuel M. Shortridge, Atty-at-Law 

Crocker Building, San Francisco. 



THE CHAMPAGNES OF 

Moeta 
Cfrcciidoii 

White Seal and Brut Imperial 

now being marketed are of the celebrated vintage of 1893. 

Messieurs. Moet & Ohandonare the most extensive vineyard pro- 
prietors in the world and their Champagnes are having a larger sale 
and are of a quality far superior to any other brand, Deing used al- 
most exclusively at all ultra-fashionable functions, among others at 
the Admiral Dewey Collation, Vanderbilt, Astor, Bradley-Martin, 
Belmont, and Stuyvesant Fish affairs.— New York Wine Circular. 

WILLIAM WOLFF & CO.. 

Pacific Coast Agents, Market Street. S. F. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 27, 1901. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC C0.--PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trains leave and are due to arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 
[Main Line. Foot of Market St.] 

LEAVEl FBOM JDLY 14, 1901 [AEEIVB 

7:00 A Benicia, Suisun, Elmlra. and Sacramento 6:25 P 

7:00 A Vacaville, Winters, Rumsey 7:55 P 

7:30 a Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo. Napa, Calistoga, Santa Rosa... 6:25 P 

8:00 A Davis. Woodland, Knights Landlne. Marysvllle, Orovllle 7:55 P 

8:00 A Atlantic Express, Ogden and East 12;25 p 

8:00 a NileB. Lathrop. Stocaton 7:25 p 

8:00a Niles, Mendota, Hanford. Visalla, Porterville 4:55 P 

8:30 A fchasta Express — Davis, Williams, (for Bartlett Springs), Wil- 
lows. Red Bluff. Portland 7:55 P 

8:30 a San Jose. Llvermore. Stockton. lone, Sacramento. Placervllle, 

Marysvllle, Chlco. Red Bluff. 4:25 P 

8:30 a Oatdale. Chinese (Yosemlte), Sonora. Carters . 4:25p 

9 00 A Haywards, Niles. and way stations 11 :55 A 

9:00 a Vallejo 12:25 P 

9:00 A Los Angeles Express— Martinez, Tracy, Lathrop, Slocfcton, 

Merced, Fresno, and Los Angeles 725P 

9:30 A Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations 7:55 P 

10:00 A The Overland Limited— Ogden, Denver, Omaha, Chicago 6:55 p 

tl:00P Sacramento River Steamers t5:00 A 

3:30 p Haywards, Niles, and way stations 7:55 P 

■1:00 f Benlcla, Winters, Sacramento, Woodland, Knights Landing, 

Marysvllle, Oroville ; 10:55 A 

4:00 P Martinez, Sao Ramon. Vallejo, Napa," Callstoga, Santa Rosa 9:25 a 

4:00 p Niles. Llvermore, Stockton, Lodl 12:25 p 

4:30p Haywards, Niles, San Jose. Livermore t8:55 a 

430 p Port Costa, Tracy. Lathrop, Stockton 10:25 A 

5:00 p The Owl Limited— Fresno. Tulare, Bakersfleld, Saugus for 

Santa Barbara, Los Angeles 8:55 a 

5:00 p Martinez, Antloch, Stockton, Merced, Fresno 12:25 p 

5:00 P Yoaemite 12 25 p 

5:30 P New Orleans Express — Mendota, Fresno, Bakersfleld, Los 

Angeles, Deming, El Paso, New Orleans, and East 7:55 A 

6:00p Haywards, Niles. and San Jose 7:55 a 

T6:00p Vallejo 11:25 A 

6:00 p Oriental Mall— Oeden, Cheyenne, Omaha, Chicago 12:25 P 

6:00 P Oriental Mail— Oeden, Denver, St. Louis, Chicago... 4:25 p 

7:00 P Oregon and California Express— Sacramento, Marysvllle, Red- 
ding. Portland, Puget Sound, and East 8:55 A 

8:05 p San Pablo, Port Costa, Martinez, and way stations 1135 A 

18:05 P Vallejo 7:55 p 

Coast Division (Narrow Gauge). (Footof Market St.) 

J7:45 A Santa Cruz Excursion to Santa Cruz and principal way sta- 
tions t3:05 p 

8:15 a Newark. Centerville. San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek. Santa 

Cruz, and way stations 5:50 p 

t2:15 P Newark, Centerville. San Jose, New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations 10:50 A 

4:15 P Newark. San Jose, Los Qatos T*:50 A 

c4:15 P Glenwood. Boulder Creek, Santa Cruz. c8:50a 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY 

From San Fbancisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— 17:15,9:00. and 11*00 
a. m. 1:00,3:00.5^15. P. M. 

From Oaki ANp — Foot of Broadway.— f6:00. J8:00, f8:05, 10;00 A, M. 12:00 
2:00, 4:00 p. M, 

Coabt Division (Broad Gauge). (Third a nd Townsend streets.) 

6:10 a San Jose and way stations r.:30 a 

T7:00 a San Jose and way stations 1-3Q f 

/7:00a New Almaden /J;l0p 

J7:30a Sunday Excursion for San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove. 

and principal way dtattous 18:30 p 

9:00 A San Jose, Hollister, Santa Cruz. Pacific Grove. Salinas. San 

Luis Obispo.Santa Barbara.and principal intermediate stations 7 :30 p 

10:30 a San Jose and way stations ... 6:30 p 

11-30 a San Jose and wavslations .......,"."." 5:30 p 

t2:45p San Mateo. Redwood. Menlo Park, Palo Alto, Santa Clara"San 
Jose, Hollister. Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, and Pacillo 

Grove tlO'45 A 

3:30 p San Jose, Tres Pinos. Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove and way 

stations 4 .jq p 

|4:15 P San Jose and principal way stations 9 -45 A 

T5:00 p San Jose, Los Oatos, and principal way stations t9:00 a 

5:30 P San Jose and ptinctpal way stations 8**36 a 

6:00 P Redwood, San Jose, Gilroy, Salinas, Santa Barbara Los An- 

eeles 10T5 a 

6:30 P San Jose and way stations t8 - 00 a 

all:45 P San Jose and way stations '"7.7"." 7*30 p 

A for Morning. p for Afternoon. t Sundays excepted. 

I Sundays only. J Tuesdays and Fridays. a Saturdays only 

e Monday. c Saturday and Sunday. 

The Pacific Transfer Company Wl n call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences, Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and other 
information. 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST and BEANNAN STREETS, at 1 p. m„ fo 

YOKOHAMA AND HONG KONG. 

calling at Kobe (Hlogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, ana connecting at Hongkong 
with steamers for India, etc No -argo received on board on day of sailing. 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Friday, Aucust 2, 1901 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Tuesday. Aueust 27. 1901 

Dobio (via Honolulu) Friday. September 20, 1901 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Tuesday, October 15. 1901 

Round Thip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 
For freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street 
corner First. D. D. STUBBS, General Manager. 



Mr. B. A. Worthington has been appointed division sup- 
erintendent o£ the Southern Pacific Company at Tucson, 
Arizona, to succeed Mr. Epes Randolph, who has resigned to 
take the management of Mr. H. E. Huntington's Los Angeles 
electric railway system. Mr. Worthington is one of the most 
valuable men in the employ of the Southern Pacific. He 
rose from the ranks, beginning as a messenger boy for the 
Central Pacific. 



Don't beat your carpet with a stick. It doesn't half 

accomplish the purpose; besides that, it injures the fabric. 
Send them to Spaulding's Carpet Cleaning Works, 353 
Tehama street, where the work is done quickly and thor- 
oughly. You will find it a money-saving proposition. They 
call for and deliver goods. Give them a trial. 



-Southfield Wellington Coal 
has no superior. Most economical. 



CALIFORNIA NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY CO. 

LESSEE 

SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC R'Y CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tibubon Febry — Foot of Market Street 

WEEK DAYS-7:30.9:00. 11:00 a.m.; 12:35.3:30.5:10,6:30 p.m. Thursdays- 
Extra Trip at 1 1 :30- p.m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :50 and 11 :30 p.m. 
SUNDAYS— 8;0o 9:30, 11:00 A.M.; 1:30, 3:30. 5:00, 6:20 p.m. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO 

WEEK DAYS— 6:10, 7:50. 9:20, 11:10 a.m.; 12:45. 3:40, 5:10 p.m. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1:55 and 6:35 p.m. 
SUNDAYS-8:10,9:40. 11:10 a.m., 1:40. 3:40, 5:05, 6:25 p.m. 

Between San Francisco and Sihuetzen Fark, same schedule as above. 



Leave San Francisco 

Week days I Sundays 

7:30 AM 8:00 am 

3:30 pm 9:30 am 

5:10 PM I 5:00 PM 



In Effect Nov. 7, 1900 I Arrive at San Francisco 



Destinations 

Novato 

Petal uma 

Santa Rosa 



Sundays I Week days 

10=40 AM I 8:40 AM 
6 #5 I'M 10:25 am 

7:35 pm I 6:22 pm 



7:30 am 



8:00 AM 



Fulton. Windsor, 

Hcaldsburg, Lytton, 

Geyservllle. Cloverdale 



J 10 25 AM 

7135 PM I 6:22 PM 



7:30 AM 


6:00 am I 


Hopland, TJkiah 


1 7135 pm 


6:22 PM 


7:30 AH 
3:30 Pm 


S.OO AM 1 


Guernevllle 


1 7:35 PM 


10:26 AM 
6:22 PM 


730 AM 

5:10 pm 


8:00 AM 1 
5:00 PM 1 


Sonoma 
Glen Ellen 


1 9:15 AM 
| 6:06 PM 


8:40 am 

6:22 PM 


7:30 am 
3:30 pm 


S:>»l AM 1 
5:011 ,-„ j 


Sebastopol 


I 10:40 AM 

[ 7:35 pm 


1 10:26 AM 
6:22 PM 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs and White Sulphur 
Springe; at Fulton for Altrurln; at Lytton for Lytton Springs; at Geyserville 
for Skaggs' Springs; at Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hopland for Duncan 
Springs. Hiflhland Springs, Eeleeyville, Carlsbad Springs. Soda Bay, Lake- 
pori, and Bartlett Springs; at TJhlah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga 8p"-iogs 
Blue Likes. Laurel Del Lake, Witter Springe. TJpper Lake, Pomo, Potter 
Valley. John Day's, Riverside, Lierley's. Bucknell's. Sanhedrin Heights 
Hullville, Boonevllle, Philo. Christine Soda Springs, Kavarro, Whiteeboro, 
Albion, Little River, Orr'a Springs. Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, Westport' 
TJsal Willite, Laytonville, Cnmmings, Bell's Springs, Harris, Olsons, Doyer, Scotia 
and Eureka. 

Satnrday-tc-Monday Ronnd Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays Bound 
Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at balf rates. 

TICKET OFFICE— 6S0 Market St., Chronicle Building. 
H. C. WHITING, Gen. Man. B. X. RYAN. Gen. Pass. Agent. 

Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 8teamersieaveBroaawfl y wharf ' 

San Francisco. 



ta 



For Alaskan ports, 11 A. m,: July 5. ]0. 15, 20, 25, 30. 
Aug. 4; change to company's steamers at Seattle. 

For B. C and Puget Sound Ports. 11 a. m„ July 5, 10, 
15, 20, 2o. 30. Aug. 4, and every filth day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay), 1 :30 p.m., July 1, 6, 11, 16, 
21, 26. 31. An t 5, and every fifth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Santa Barbara, Port 
Los Angeles. Redondo (Los Angeles). Steamer "Santa Rosa," Sundays, 
9 a.m.; steamer "State of California." Wednesdays 9 a.m.. 

For Los Angeles, calling at Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Simeon, Cayuoos 
Port Harford (San LuIb Obispo), Gaviota. Santa Barbara, Ventura, Hue- 
neme. San Pedro. East San Pedro, and 'Newport ('Corona only). 
Steamer '* Corona/' Saturdays, 9 a.m.; Steamer '* Bonlta." Tuesdays 
9 a.m. 

For Mexican Ports, lo a.m., 7th of each month- 

For further Information obtain Company's folder. 

The company reserves the right to change steamers, sailing dates, and 
hours of sailing, without previous notice. 

TICKET OFFICE— No, 4 New Montgomery street (Palaoe Hotel). 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen.Agts. 10 Market St., San Francisco 



8S "Sierra," for Australia Thursday, Aug 1, 10 a.m. 
SS "Australia." for Tahiti. Tues.. Aug fl. 10 a.m. 
SS "Mariposa, "Hono. o^ly. Sat-. Aug 10. at 2 p. m. 
line to Coolgardie. Australia, and Capetown, 
South Africa, 

J. D. 8PRECKELS.fcBROS.CO., 
Agents. 643 Market Street. Freight Office, 327 
Market St,, San Francisco, 







Price per copy, 10 cents. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856. 



Annual Subscription, H 00 



News-:1e 



(£> alif ornrnXb to rt i s jc r. 




Volume LXMI 



SAN FRANCISCO. AUGUST 3, 1901. 



Number 5. 



Primed end published every Saturday by the proprietor, FRED 
MARRIOTT, 5,4 Kearny str. el. San Franc sco. Entered al Son Frmi- 
elaco Foaiomcv as second-clats matter. 

The office ol the S. F. NEWS LETTER In London, Eng., Is at SO Cornhill 
E. C, London, Englatnl, Uleorge Street ,t Co.. Representatives), where 
Information may be obtained regarding subscriptions and advertising 
rales. Paris, France — Office. No. 37 Avenue de L'Opera. 

All social items, announcements. advertising or other matter, intended for 
publication in the current number of the NEWS LETTER si ould be 
sent to this office not later thau 6 p.m. Thursday 



Since gas has been reduced to 75 cents per thousand a re- 
adjustment of the meters will be in order. 



Mr. Thomas Sharkey, the famous orator, is coming West, 
but where he is going to lecture his managers do not say. 



If some one would offer a $1,000,000 prize to the man who 
catches the smallest fish along the coast this year, the pis- 
catorial liars might give us a rest till next season. 



The Constitution in another of her trial races has suffered 
an accident more serious than her first. A few more trial 
races like these and the real event will be rendered impos- 
sible. 



A dispatch from Colfax says that a man who was found 
near there with his throat cut, told a very disconnected 
story. Considering the nature of his wound, that is not 
surprising. 



There is again a battleship Maine in the United States 
Navy. She was launched at Philadelphia Saturday. Let 
us hope that she will give no such cause for remembrance as 
the old Maine. 



Two San Franciscans returned from the Klondike this week 
with over $100,000 in gold dust, thus proving that a lucky 
man may find something else besides small pox and contempt 
of court in the far north. 



The State Medical Board's high tariff on practitioners 
entering the State may be a hardship to some reputable 
physicians, but it will more than compensate in the saving 
of life. 



It has been recommended that Parliament grant Lord 
Roberts $500,000 in recognition of his work in South Africa. 
In this country heroes are treated differently. We drag them 
up before Courts of Inquiry. 



Oakland detectives believe that Mrs. Teeple, who stole a 
lot of flower pots and plants, is a kleptomaniac. Oakland 
detectives would believe almost anything. Ordinary, un- 
biased people would pronounce her a thief. 



The Boers who are complaining because their women and 
children are not kept in first-class hotels by the British, 
doubtless see no inhumanity in the all too frequent murder- 
ing of British wounded on the field. 



Vincent Biasoli of San Francisco was engaged to be 
married. He was also short of cash. His furniture was 
insured for $200. The brilliant thought struck him that he 
would set his flat on fire and get the insurance money. The 
first part of the scheme worked all right, but he was caught 
and will probably get five years. And probably the girl will 
marry someone else. Sans furniture, sans money, sans girl 
and sans liberty — truly, fate is hard. 



The news that a horse thief was hanged to a tree near 
Tucson, Arizona, last week, should come as a ray of hope 
in the mivelists of the Baal who are bemoaning the fact 
licit tin- Weal is fast losing its "local color." 



In Southern California they are turning the civilized In 
ilians otf their farms to starve in the open. In \vashington 
the laws are allowing white traders to sell whisky to the 
aboriglneB. It would take an anthropologist to tell which 
system is the most rapid as a race exterminator. 



San Jose ranchers threaten to shoot clogs used to hunt 
deer on their ranches. They are not to be blamed, but jus 
tice would be better satisfied if they would shoot the mis 
creants who use hounds in hunting deer. 



The W. C. T. U. and the preachers must be in a trance. 
Thirteen thousand Government claims were disposed of by 
lottery, yet these reformers never entered a protest. Maybe 
a vivid remembrance of church fairs kept them silent. 



The fact that the Civil Service . Commissioners have ex- 
pressed their preference for male stenographers to those of 
the female persuasion, would lead us to believe that civil 
service reform has been more than half realized. 



Who says that we are more democratic than our British 
cousins? The Irish nationalists have seen fit to strongly 
criticise the title bill of King Edward, but no American 
patriot has ever raised a protest against Mr. McKinley's 
title, "Bill." 



The latest San Quentin scandal hinges on the fraudulent 
sales of jute bags made by the prisoners. San Quentin is 
wha't may be known as an automatic prison. It makes 
criminals and attends to them after they are convicted. Who 
is it that says that we have not the greatest prison system 
in the world? 



Mrs. Carrie Nation says she will stay in jail forever before 
paying her fine. Nothing would suit the public uetter. If 
the authorities have any sense of the fitness of things they 
will not urge her to pay it, but, on the contrary, will dis- 
courage her as much as possible. 



The worm has wriggled a protest. Miss Elizabeth Van 
Duzer, a wealthy American heiress, has sued a Parisian res- 
taurant for an extortionate bill which was handed to her, 
simply because she was an American. Yankee travelers 
ought to regard the lady as the savior of her country. 



A Frenchman has launched a scheme to connect the Klon- 
dike and Paris by rail. This would suggest that the northern 
digger was getting tired of the American vaudeville queen 
and was intending to import his bonny brides from the music 
halls of Paris. What else could be the reason for this strange 
move, for what other common bond can there be between 
the Klondike and the French capital? 



Mr. Miles T. Baird and Mr. Albert Aiken started for the 
Yosemite on an automobile not so long ago, to prove that 
the machine was capable of making the trip. Part of the 
distance the automobile went on its own resources, the rest 
of the way it was dragged by a horse. Most of the way back 
the auto came by train. Thus has it been proven finally and 
conclusively that an automobile if not capable of malting the 
Yosemite trip is at least capable of taking it. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 3, 1901. 



A LESSON TO THE STRIKERS. 

Judge Sloss has done his duty. Whilst it is not excessive 
praise to say so much, because every official, and especially 
every judge, ought to be prepared to do that without fear, 
favor or affection, it is certain that not all of our Superior 
Judges, or Supreme ones either, would have hewn to the 
line and let the chips fall where they might, in the workman- 
like manner that Judge Sloss has so conscientiously followed. 
Weak-kneed Judges are the natural outcome of an elective 
judiciary. It is not in human nature for a judge, for right- 
eousness sake, to give a decision that will cost him his 
office. The labor vote, when united, as it appears to be at 
present, can defeat the re-election of any judge, and as 
consequence it too frequently controls his action on the 
Bench. Happily, Judge Sloss will not need to seek a second 
term of office for more than five years to come, and by that 
time conditions will not be what they are to-day. A change 
has got to come, and tradesmen have got to be guaranteed 
the right to manage their own affairs to suit themselves 
as long as they do not impinge upon the rights of others, 
or all business will be brought to a standstill, as is very 
nearly the case at this moment. The right of a working- 
man to drop his tools and quit work at any moment he sees 
fit seems to be conceded by our courts, and does not appear 
to be denied in any quarter. Yet we are free to assert, 
without fear of successful contradiction, that it is an ill- 
considered and improvident concession. Employees ought 
not always to be the sole judges of when they may leave 
their employer's property to take care of itself. When 
they act together in combination, and without reasonable 
notice of their intention, prevent fresh fruit from being 
taken from the wharves, stop a steamer from going to sea 
with her mails and passengers, hang up a train under a full 
head of steam, insist that a restaurant dinner shall not be 
served that is already cooked, and when they abandon a 
vessel lying out in the stream to the mercy of the winds, 
waves and tides, they are guilty of most monstrous and in- 
tolerable wrongs, which, if they are not, as we believe they 
are, criminal conspiracies, ought to be made so by an un- 
equivocal enactment. Yet all of these wrongs, with many 
others of like nature, have been committed in this city 
during tne present week, and it is believed that even greater 
outrages have yet to come. 

Judge Sloss has opened the ball and it ought to be kept 
going. There is legal redress for almost every one of the 
acts that are now being countenanced by the unions. Watch- 
ers should be constantly employed to gather the evidence, 
and jurists, well read in common law practice, should be 
engaged to present it in proper form to the courts, and with- 
out a doubt relief can be had in that way. When cases 
susceptible of easy proof occur, like that of the citizen who 
was badly beaten the other day for driving his own horse 
and wagon, the unionists and their sympathizers who par- 
ticipate in them ought to be prosecuted with the utmost 
rigor of the law. It is rank cowardice and worse to let 
the unionists off with the bald explanation that it was "all 
a mistake." How would it have bettered their outrage If the 
citizen had been driving that horse for a day's wages? 
Would it have made their act any more justifiable? 
The excuse only makes the case worse, because it shows that 
there was a design to treat non-union men with violence. 
If the nowling mob who aided and abetted that man-whip- 
ping had ah been "run in," and given the full penalty that 
the law allows for a murderous assault, soon plenty of non- 
unionists would be ready to go to work, and quickly the trou- 
ble would be over. If there are not policemen enough to 
handle the business, more should be appointed, and if they 
cannot be had the militia should be called out. Blink the 
fact as we may, and deny it as the unionists do. it yet re- 
mains a fact that this strike owes its success to force or 
the fear of it. Lawless violence should be repressed, no 
matter at what cost. Idle men ought not to be permitted 
to gather on the wharves where all the room is needed for 
the workers. The course of the dailies in this connection is 
odious. Frightened at the possible loss of a few unworthy 
subscribers, there is not one of them that dares tell the 
strikers the truth or call its soul its own. But if this thing 
goes much further there will be an organization of adver- 
tisers that will make them unseal their lips and force them 
to divulge the true state of affairs. 



DO WE NEED A WHIPPING POST? 

The fact that Judge B. C. Hart made a record for himself 
by sentencing two footpads last week to a life term in San 
Quentin prison tempts us to the question: did the court take 
the wisest course to stamp "out the all too common crime of 
highway robbery? It is undoubtedly true that the two men 
sentenced were put. effecually out of the way, but the reader 
must remember that while these convicts are serving their 
life term they are doing so at State expense, and the honest 
tax-payers are contributing to their permanent board and 
keep. Is there no simpler method of discouraging the pro- 
fessional sand-baggers and garroters who are wont to lurk 
at night on the dark side of the street, ready to knock down 
and plunder honest citizens? 

The English penal code, not so many years back, offered 
a remedy which was as simple as it was effective — the eat- 
o'-nine-tails. At that time London was plagued with noc- 
turnal robberies of the most violent description. Garroters 
lurked i_i every dark corner and no citizen was safe after 
dark, it was then that the lash was resorted to with an ef- 
fect that was no less than magical. The whipping adminis- 
tered by the State was no trivial affair, and a man who had 
once undergone the ordeal seldom needed a second treat- 
ment, in the rare cases when the culprit did need the atten- 
tion of the court again, his howls and whines were pitiable 
when the number of lashes were read out to him by the 
court. 

The thought of whipping-post justice may cause a shud- 
der. It may be a trifle mediaeval in method, but the crime 
which it is intended to cure is by no means a modern or re- 
fined one. A chronic felon will go to jail for ten or twelve 
years, or even for life, without so much as a tnrill of .regret, 
but threaten him with a twinge of physical pain and he will 
think twice before doing that which he should not do. His 
perverted brain is not susceptible of much emotion, but his 
low physical organism will yield readily to pain. Our State 
Legislators should take the lesson of the London cat-o'- 
nine-tails to heart. Let them experiment with a whipping- 
post in every town where thugs are terrorizing the citizens, 
and the courts will find no life sentences necessary to fill 
to overflowing that pleasant boarding-house which we are 
maintaining for our weaker brother at San Quentin. 



PROVERBS AND MICROBES. 

As a rule, proverbs are foolish, untruthful affairs, not sus- 
ceptible of reason, carrying weight only by virtue of sound, 
and appealing to those who see words but do not think of 
their meaning. But there is one, time-honored and oft- 
quoted, and, for a wonder, true: "Cleanliness is next to God- 
liness." 

This preambles a few remarks on microbes and health, 
which are diametrically opposed to each other, and between 
whom the contest is unequal: — microbes invariably win out. 
Small, they are insidious, work constantly and never strike. 
If there is a union among them it is for the prolongation of 
the wording day. 

If a concentrated battle were waged against them they 
might in time be vanquished — but. instead of fighting them, 
we assist them in their work and make life as easy for them 
as possible. Many and varied are the sanitary ordinances 
passed, obedience to which would help in the fight. But 
ideas of personal freedom, carelessness, dirtiness and pure 
cussedness, combined with a laxity in those who should en- 
force these laws, make them almost dead letters. We have 
an ordinance forbidding people to spit on the sidewalks 
and in public places. In the several years that have gone by 
since this was passed, there have been a few spasmodic ar- 
rests. The ordinance and Mr. "Bill" Bradbury were made 
famous once by, the latter's arrest for defiling the floor of 
a street car, and after a prolonged legal battle he was fined 
five dollars. But nothing was clone to the fiery Mr. Addison 
Mizner on the historical occasion when he spit in Mr. Ed- 
ward Greenway's beer. Maybe the police thought that was 
a personal matter. 

But to come back to the si.ewalk ordinance. It is being 
\iolated thousands of times every day by uncleanly people 
who. if they do not know better, should be taught better. 
Ignorance of the law should form less of a defense for this 
misdemeanor than for any other. A man indecent enough 



August 3, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



3 



• !<• nn the sidewalk or In any public place should 
About once in six n 
ih" polli ■ make ■ few arrests for this offense, watch frltin 
public for s few days, th.-n conditions are us b 
II the cornen and in front ol cigar 
■ -it a huge i uspldor, and it is a tad thai pi 
to be watchful that tiny themselves ai 
the same us.-. Microbes chortle In glee at all this 
the way they an- bred. The sidewalks swarm with 
them. They are distributed by the winds and breathed by 
everybody. Tiny are taken home by fair ladles who weai 
trailing dresses, of course, tne ladles should wear short 
skirts. But suppose they won't? It is a matter of personal 
vanity with them. Vanity is a delightful feminine fault which 
ni> sane or normal man wants to see stamped out. It is easier 
to crush the habll which makes the result of their vanity 
dangerous, and which is inspired by swinish traits that 
should he crushed. Let the ladies wear what they wish, 
and let I he police see that they have cleau sidewalks for the 
parade of their finery. 



HUMAN NATURE AND ORGANIZED LABOR. 

The essential and inherent defect in the case made on li 
half of organized labor is that the unions cannot he trusted 
to keep their agreements. They do not keep faith. Manager 
(tenner of the Draymen's Association has given instances of 
rbitrary fashion in which the Brotherhood of Teamsters 
have hroken their agreements with the employer. The oase 
is not singular. It is in fact the almost uniform experience 
of employers here and at the East. Agreements are con- 
stantly broken by the unions where they see any real or 
supposed advantage to be gained. 

We do not mention this by way of reproach but only to 
point out the inherent, necessary weakness of the position 
assumed by organized labor. The condition is not at all pe- 
culiar. It is common to the policy of all bodies governed 
by popular vote. It is the inherent vice of democracy. 
The policy of all such bodies is necessarily unstable for the 
reason that there is no such thing as a collective conscience. 
Nations as well as labor unions have no conscience. The 
moral law has no binding force on national purpose. The 
rawest form of immediate, often short-sighted, self-interest 
is the motive power of collective endeavor. It is not neces- 
sary to specify instances. Every man can supply them for 
himself. 

In this view the employers have no alternative but fight. 
They want to be fair to the men and holxl pleasant relations 
with them. Individually, doubtless most of the men want to 
be fair to their employers, but collectively they are not 
lair, and the experience is that they cannot be fair and just 
in their organized capacity. That is human nature. 



WHAT'S IN A NAME ? 

The English are proposing an alteration in the official title 
of King Edward so that it may more nearly accord with his 
sovereign relation to the whole British Empire. The change 
is not asked for by the colonies, and pronably would give 
offense if any of them were named in the new title. At 
present he is only "Edward, by the grace of God, King of 
the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, defender 
of the faith, and Emperor of India." This, of course, does not 
include the whole of the possessions over which he rules. 
He is nobody and nothing to Canada, Australia or Cape 
Colony. When Lord Beaconsfleld had the late Queen named 
"Empress of India" he had to agree that the new title should 
not be used in England. "God save the Queen" was too 
deeply imbedded in the hearts of Englishmen for them to fall 
in with a title that was foreign to them. The liberal party 
went on record as opposing the application of the imperial 
title to Great Britain, and it may be predicted that if an 
effort be made to constitute Edward Emperor of the whole 
dominion under the British flag there will be sundry scenes 
in the House of Commons. At least the Irish members — 
loveable men that they are — may be expected to be in their 
glory trying to coin a name that may be expected to stick 
to Edward as long as he lives. They are adepts in that line. 
Americans, it may be added, will be reminded by this pro- 
gramme regarding King Edward's title that equally logical 
would be an alteration in the official designation of the 



" '" nf "h" Unltt our imperialists win doubt 

le that tie ntie do longei 

requirements of the situation, site • Mi Mi K ml only 

President of the in.; . ., other in 

Porto RJi o and tie- Philippines, whit h b) tie Supreme • 

i im pan of the United staler Whal should the 
new title be? The Springfield Republic i-:i > 

historically and spiritual!) the word IBmperor 1 
mis the requirements of the situation .is well as any that 
could »" dragged from the bowels of langaage." The Eng- 
lish people probably do not like to see their king overshad- 
owed by ins nephew of Germany, in like manner why should 
our President be over-laid by bis English cousin? Long live 
Emperor McKlnley. 



A PERMIT WANTED FOR A BULL FIGHT. 
A man in Mexico thinks there would be money in a bull 
fight entertainment given in San Francisco, and has written 
In Mayor Phelan to know I he cost of a permit. Our worthy 
chief magistrate has replied that there is a law in this Slate 
1st cruelty to animals and an active society of citizens 
to secure its enforcement. Besides, we do not care for a 
pastime that has had its full share in demoralizing the Span- 
ish race, it survives among no other people and cannot, we 
think, find a congenial home among Americans. It is a 
cruel and brutal sport, for which not one good word can be 
said. On the Fourth of July Omaha gave it a trial before 
in.noo persons, many of whom were women. The game was 
to enrage and worry the bulls but not to kill them. The 
bulls, however, were free to kill the Spanish toreadors, im- 
ported for the show, if they could, and they nearly succeeded 
in one case, the man falling before the rush of an infuriated 
animal, was trampled upon and seriously injured. The chil- 
dren screamed and the women fainted. The show did not 
proceed further, because the crowd did not care to see any 
more. Officers of the local humane society were present to 
pass judgment on the tolerability of the sport, but it did not 
proceed long enough to permit any great cruelty, except to 
the fallen man, who had just flaunted a red blanket in the ani- 
mal's face. His unfortunate slip brought him to grass, and 
he paid for his temerity with several broken ribs and numer- 
ous bruises. It was generally conceded to be anything but 
a lovely sight, and would not "go" in Omaha, although it 
was originally intended to give two dozen exhibitions. San 
Francisco suffers enough in the estimation of her Eastern 
friends because of the many man-fights she tolerates and 
patronizes. Successful Spanish bull fights in San Fran- 
cisco would be a shock to American sentiment. 



A DELUSION SHATTERED. 

A few years ago a great outcry was raised over the sup- 
posed destruction of fish by seals and sea-lions. Men were 
hired by the State to kill them by the wholesale, and 
hunters were allowed to make indiscriminate slaughter. 
There was even talk of killing the colony of seals on the 
Cliff House rocks, but luckily the destruction did not go so 
far. Nevertheless, tens of thousands of seals and many sea- 
lions were destroyed by pelt-hunters. They visited the near- 
by islands, entering the rookeries at breeding time and kill- 
ing without stint. As the skins are worth very little great 
numbers of the animals had to be destroyed to make much 
profit. But their acts were looked upon leniently, as it was 
thought tnat the fishing industry was being protected and 
benefited. 

It has rested with two Stanford University men to upset 
this theory. They have been investigating the seal rookeries 
for tne Government, and, surprising as it may seem, have 
discovered that the seals, instead of being enemies of the 
fishermen, are their best friends. On the San Miguel and 
Santa Cruz Islands the Stanford men killed sixty-three seals 
and examined their stomachs. Of the sixty-three only three 
were found to contain edible fish.. The others contained 
devil-fish, squid and shell-fish. They took seals from every 
part of the islands where they were to be found, and their 
investigations proved conclusively that the seals are the 
best friends the fishermen have. 

It is to be hoped that the result of this discovery will 
be legislation for the. protection of the seals. If indiscrimi- 
nate destruction is allowed to go on a few years will see their 
extinction. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 3, 1901. 



MEDICAL KNOWLEDGE AND TREATMENT OF 
TUBERCULOSIS. 

If the great Medical Congress just held in London shows 
one thing plainer than another, it is how little the medical 
world yets knows of that most-to-be-feared scourge of hu- 
manity — tuberculosis. While war has its tens of victims 
consumption has its thousands, and, as population becomes 
more crowded and sanitation more difficult, their number is 
by no means decreasing. Medical science has during the 
past few years given out many intimations of what it was 
doing in this connection, and it has not hesitated to prophesy 
that the time was at hand when the dread disease would be 
utterly extirpated from the face of the earth. Alas! There 
is nothing in the proceedings of perhaps the greatest medical 
congress the world ever saw to afford a reasonable justifi- 
cation for any such hope. 

The savants could not agree among themselves as to what 
tuberculosis really is, whence it comes, or how it is to be 
diagnosed in its early stages, when alone it is curable. They 
are not sure as to how it can be prevented, and are altogether 
silent as to how it can be successfully treated. 

Professor Koch, for instance, is quite sure that it is not 
transmittable from animals to men. The milk and meat of 
tuberculosis cows are absolutely harmless according to his 
theory, which however he cannot demonstrate because he 
has never been permitted to innoculate a human being. But 
the unfortunate fact is that human beings have been 
so innoculated without their consent, have taken the disease 
in consequence, and have died from it. Whole districts, 
where not so much as a suspicion of tuberculosis had ex- 
isted, suddenly became afflicted after the arrival of animals 
proven to be diseased. This is especially true in Canada, 
where the subject has been forced upon the attention of the 
authorities, and is receiving a perhaps more thorough treat- 
ment than elsewhere. Very large sums are being there ex- 
pended in the inspection of cattle, in destroying them when 
the disease has reached a certain stage, and in withdrawing 
them at all stages from the neighoorhood of human habita- 
tions. 

Both New York and Ottawa have had their medical con- 
gresses during the past years consider the tuberculosis 
question. The reports of their proceedings are before us, 
and it is not too much to say that they indicate a more prac- 
tical and thorough treatment of the matter than was given 
to it in London. The Ottawa report is especially valuable. 
The Minister of Public Health said among other things that 
"it would be idle for anybody to tell the experienced physi- 
cians of Canada that tuberculosis was not communicable 
from cattle as well as from human beings." Another speaker 
said that "bovine tuberculosis could be traced all through the 
country by the trails of diseased animals. Our people under- 
stand this, and fly from the presence of a coming herd as 
they would from the approach of a prairie fire." It may well 
be believed that a large cattle raising country like Canada 
is a better field for observation than the laboratory of Pro- 
fessor Koch in Berlin. 

Another disputed question among scientists is as to 
whether or not tuberculosis is necessarily the work of bacilli. 
At the New York congress held in May last, Dr. Hubbard 
Winslow Mitchell reported that six hundred cases of pul- 
monary consumption had come under his care, but that, in 
many of even the most pronounced eases no bacilli existed, 
and he adds: "If, then, cases are identical where bacilli 
exist, and where they do not exist, we must look a little fur- 
ther before we say positively that pulmonary consumption 
depends for its being on this special germ." If Dr. Mitchell's 
microscope be not at fault, he has struck a paralyzing blow 
at our assumed knowledge of tuberculosis. So much for what 
medical science does not know on the subject. It will be 
more interesting to the lay reader to learn if there be any- 
thing it does know. There is. and it is well summarized in 
these words of Dr. Sir William Houston of Montreal : 

"Tuberculosis is not an hereditary disease. Consumption 
is not confined to the lungs; we may have it in the liver, 
the kidneys, the bones, in the knee-joints.' - He had seen it 
on the lips of a young lady teacher who scratched her lip 
with a pencil: The bacillus enters the lungs from the air. 
People are not careful. They spit indiscriminately. The germ 
in the sputum lives for months, and is disseminated by the 



atmosphere. It is scattered by ladies with long skirts, by 
much-handled bank bills, etc. It is not hereditary; it is 
preventable; it is curable, not in the last stages, but in the 
early stages. For the consolation of those who could not 
afford it, he said change of climate was not so important, 
and friends should never consent to people going to Florida 
and afar off to die away from home. 

Then as to the best treatment, the concensus of opinion of 
the New York congress was expressed by Dr. Mitchell in 
these words: 

"In beginning treatment in a case where a reasonable hope 
appears for a final cure, the first thing in my judgment to 
do is to improve the physical condition of the patient by the 
use of nutritious diet, by rest, the free use of the bath, by 
quinine and strychnine to reduce fever, by the judicious use 
of stimulants such as whisky or brandy, to fill the depleted 
blood vessels by the copious use of some good mineral water, 
and lastly, and above all, the persistent use of some remedy 
which is calculated to saturate the blood and so bring it 
in contact, as. far as possible, with the diseased portion of 
the lung. 

"In my hands the use of the solution of hypochlorite of 
sodium, to which is added hydrochloric acid and bromine, 
has proved the most efficient. 

"I usually give the remedy in half ounce doses before each 
meal and at bed-time, and sometimes I have increased it up 
to 3 and 4 per day, but rarely above 3. It must be persevered 
in for a long time, as the disease is very chronic in its course, 
and with the adjunct above named, with complete rest, I 
have had results which greatly encouraged me." 



CHINESE HAVE GREATLY INCREASED IN NUMBERS. 

The revised figures from the Census Bureau show that the 
Chinese population of the United States is falling off. They 
numbered 89,800 in 1900, as compared with 107,475 in 1890. 
This was a shrinkage of 17,675 in the decade. In previous 
censuses they have usually shown marked increases. It is 
clear that they are either dying or leaving the country at the 
rate of 1,760 a year; so that within another decade or two 
there will be few, if any left. When the figures by States 
are available, it will undoubtedly be found that while the 
Chinese inhabitants of the country are falling off, those who 
are here are distributing themselves more and more widely 
throughout the different sections. The Pacific Coast has 
many thousands fewer than ten years ago. They meet with 
better treatment in the Middle West and Atlantic States, 
where they are in great request as domestic servants, and 
naturally they are gravitating Eastward in considerable num- 
bers. They make themselves so useful that our friends on 
the other side of the Rockies want more of them, and are 
at a loss to understand what our objections to them can be. 
Our local labor unions found out how that was the other day, 
when they so fervently beseeched the members of the Ep- 
worth League to work for the renewal of the Geary Exclu- 
sion Law. The Leaguers could not see it to be their duty 
to do anything of the kind, and so did not vouchsafe a reply 
to the unions' excited appeal. They were unable to see with 
what consistency they could advocate the exclusion of 
Chinese from this country so long as they insisted upon the 
admission of their missionaries into China. As a body of 
Christian workers they felt themselves bound by the golden 
rule to do unto others as they would have others do unto 
them. That rule ought to be equally binding upon this 
Christian nation at large. We have fined the Chinese people 
525.000,000 because some of them tried to turn our mission- 
aries out — this whilst we will not let their people in. 
It is a bad rule that does not work both ways. How Presi- 
dent McKinley can argue otherwise with Minister Wu we are 
at a loss to conceive. It is well known that our diplomats 
in Peking do not attempt to justify the course of their 
country in regard to this matter. They try to excuse it as 
a mere temporary expedient to quiet our pick and shovel 
men. "It is a necessary act of Government," say they. The 
Chinese Government has said the same thing in regard to 
its forced toleration of the Boxers, but it has been terribly 
fined and punished all the same. We go wild over the amount 
of goods we are going to sell China, yet we will not let the 
Chinese sell their labor among us. The coming trade would 
have been here by this time had we better learned what Is 
due to the comity of nations. 



Augu.t 3. 1901. 3AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

A Society Girl Me^y Be Useful. 



By Mr*. Chauncey DeWit. 

Society women never toll but they sometimes spin. I know 
of any number of girls who have concocted oceans of nc. k- 
wear and hemstitched and embroidered miles of handker 
chiefs. I can take oath that a few girls have even achieved 
crisp, tailored-looking shirtwaists that defy any one to flml 
"home-made" finger-prints. A society girl that I know has 
Just finished the last piece of a dainty layette that her mar- 
ried sister appreciates far more than any little dresses 
money could buy. It is a mistake to lay the sin of domestic 
Ignorance at every society girl's door. Miss Greta Pomeroy 
can cook her way into any gourmet's heart, and Mrs. Clar- 
ence Mackay is a deft needlewoman who could give pointers 
to a professional. Yet these two young women belong to the 
gay set in New York that is not supposed to know a knit- 
ting needle from the gridiron. There is no crying need why 
they should, but they do. and San Francisco society is thick 
with their prototypes — girls who can cook and sew as well as 
play golf and do pink teas and blue receptions. Margaret 
Salisbury is full of original ideas for charming accessories 
to a gown, and she can put them into execution herself. 
A flower muff, a chiffon boa, a satin stock, or a swell belt 
grow like magic under her adroit fingers. Marie Oge is an- 
other girl who has always some needlework on hand, and 
countless stunning fol de rols are stitched to her credit. 
I remember visiting Miss West's one afternoon and found 
a dozen girls circled around plump, pretty Lola Davis, 
whose dimpled fingers were putting the finishing touches 
to an exquisite set of lingerie. The girls were bemoaning 
the fact that they were not all as accomplished needlewomen 
as is this maiden, and threatened to learn at once. So even 
among the younger set the art is in good odor. 

A modified Empire style of gown for street wear will oe 
introduced in the fall. Empire gowns have queened it for 
evening functions, but this bid for street favor is a new de- 
parture. The jupe Empire skirt is the latest innovation in 
the skirt line, and is really a feeler put out to see whether 
the Empire street gowns will be accepted in autumn. The 
jupe Empire skirt is no relation to the jupe corselet so much 
In vogue just now. The corselet hugs the waist tightly, 
while the Empire skirt is all drapery, its front gore being 
carried up almost under the bust. It is void of seams, or 
close fittings, and is kept in a moderately loose condition 
so as to preserve the perpendicular line at all costs. A bolero 
must be worn with this skirt. Those who are extremely 
slender may attempt it. but every one else should keep off 
the grass. 

A Menlo Park bride is trying to introduce the fashion of 
wearing mitts. She drove over with some friends to the 
Blingum clubhouse the other day, and did not pull off her 
mitts until luncheon was served, and every one had had a 
chance to "rubber." Her mitts were not the old-fashioned 
thread affairs, but were made of a deep creamy, rather heavy 
lace that showed her hands white in contrast, and gave full 
sparkle to her flashing rings. For the reason that they gave 
these finger adornments a chance to blink in the sun, 
if for no other, mitts ought to be popular for summer wear. 
Aside from that fact they are a fitting accompaniment to the 
elbow sleeves that are so modish; then they are far cooler 
to wear than long kid gloves, and accord better with light 
diaphanous frocks. 

Foulards have taken a new lease of life, but they are so 
changed their first admirers would not recognize them. A 
white surface with a two-shade design in arabesques, swirls. 
or scrolls, is very popular. A pale background with a vine 
design aone in delicate green leaves and lovely blossoms, 
is exceedingly smart. Foulards, except in texture of silk, 
weight, and crispness, are not akin to their ancestors who 
were first on the market. 

Satin cloaks for evening wear are going to drive all others 
to the shelf. White satin cloaks embroidered in gold, with 
relief touches of black, are to be "the thing." The lining for 
these cloaks is a white satin Turkish fabric imported from 
the land of the harems. 

Mrs. Martin has a new picture of Lily Oelrichs that is 



■ vouchor for lor tut* In the • am black 

Btriklng, even Been through the p] dliim, The 

and skirl are perfectly plain, u rtrllng and 

sweeping In graceful, clinging lines, and the bodice cul v.-rv 

los. bach and front, a scarf ol illusion resting lightly In the 

white skin and Bo the shoulders, Ell 

enl sleeves, guiltless of raffles, swathe the upper pari of a 

wondrously pretty nun. 



Valuable 

Papers 

Lost 



Can rarely be replaced. 
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when you can rent a 
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L. CAHEIN & SON, Agents, Wholesale Liqusr Dealers, 

Send for Pamphle 418 Sacramento Street, 

WM. WILLIAMS & SONS 

(LTD.) OF ABERDEEN. 

ScotchJJVhisky 

Importers - MACONDRAY & CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 3, 1901. 




Tkasurelr 
Wand 

SCJeoity nowand tut P/eaiUre'S-Z^ 
* J _ r om Moon. ■ -rm 




As John Churton Collins says in his "Ephemera Critica," in 
which he has pounded without mercy the vices ot literary 
log-rolling: "It is time that someone should speak out." 
After the performance of "Aida" at the Tivoli, on Monday 
night, the critics of the daily papers yawped our provincial- 
ism to the world in a chorus of glorification and intemperate 
eulogy. Superlatives were as the sands of the sea, and every 
singer in the cast was smeared with praise. There are 
but two ways to account for this flood of fustian. The writers 
convict themselves of either crass ignorance or rank favor- 
itism. Once a year the Tivoli gives us a season of grand 
opera. I have always found it possible to extract much 
pleasure from these endeavors, which are conscientious and 
worthy of support. The management is always at pains to 
acquire capable artists and it deserves credit for what it 
accomplishes. The performances are tne best in the world — 
for the price; but, as I have said many times before, the 
price should have nothing to do with the appraisement of 
esthetic right and wrong. An artist is either good or bad, 
whether one pays fifty cents or five dollars to hear him. 
The Tivoli productions are wonderful for what one pays to 
hear them, but when a number of "news-gatherers," for as 
such are the critics rated in the code of modern journalism, 
exceed the truth and inveit the facts, it stultifies the com- 
munity, which accepts their opinions as an expression of the 

public taste. 

* * * 

Concerning the production of "Aida" on Monday night, the 
facts ai ; these: It was a good, popular performance of a 
great opera, ably aided by the enthusiasm of a large, friendly 
audience. With the single exception of Salassa, whose 
Amanaso is by no means above reproach, there was not 
a single member of the cast who displayed distinct merit, 
and most of them were variously vulnerable. The stage 
management was ludicrously bad, and the orchestra incom- 
petent. I have never, before Monday night, left a perform- 
ance of "Aida" — and I have seen Verdi's best, if not his 
most advanced, opera fully forty times — without taking with 
me the spell of the music of the last act. In this cape, how- 
ever, instead of the lingering strains of that ineffably sweet 
and pathetic duo, "O terra, addio," the sweep of tne strings 
in the orchestra, the mystical mingling of the sacred dance 
and the chant of the priests of Phtah, I was conscious only of 
a grossly mismanaged stage, a bleating tenor, and a thick 
orchestral accompaniment. Barbarescni, who sang "Aida," 
has the dramatic temperament, which gives her a naturally 
emotional recitative, but she is without the refinements and 
iacks a well-defined mezzo-voce which robs her singing of 
color and expression. Her phrasing is bad, and altogether it 
seems as if she had begun to sing before she was through 
learning how. She has an agreeable roundness of tone in 
her middle register, and, with the exception of Patti, is the 
best looking Aida I have ever seen. Castellano has nothing 
to his credit but vigor, which does not compensate for his 
awkward acting and the extremely disagreeable quality of 
his voice, which is strident and marked by an irritating vi- 
brato. His "Celeste Aida" was disappointing from the first 
marshal recitative to the final B flat. The "Vieni meco" 
was absolutely ineffective, and if anything could be weaker 
than the introductory recitative in the last scene, "La fatal 
pietra," which is written entirely upon one note and demands 
a peculiar expressiveness, it was his solo part of the "O 
terra addio," which he gave in a ludicrous bleating treble. 

* * * 

It was not difficult to prophesy that Collamorini would be 
a poor Amneris. She is utterly out of place in opera seria. 
Mr. Crawford to the contrary notwithstanding. She slurred 
the music, jerking the tempo both ways at once, and led 
the orchestra a merry dance with her elisions and tempo ru- 
bato. She vulgarizes Verdi, and her low notes, which one 
critic has called "velvety," are as harsh as the sounds pro- 



duced by that extraordinary invention, the female barytone 
of vaudeville. Her ability, which is considerable within her 
limitations, lies all in one direction. She has acquired fame as 
a comedienne and a singer of "tandas, ' but prima donna con- 
tralto — gia mai nella vita. Salassa's noble voice, a marvel 
of preservation, is as good as when we first heard it two 
years ago. He uses no more of it than is necessary, and in 
his acting he never transcends tradition, "out there is won- 
drous and never-to-be-forgotten volume and resonance in his 
tinging of such phrases as the "sposa felice" and "pensa 
che un popolo.'" Dado, the new basso, was a worthy Ram- 
phis, though the richness of his voice is limited in range. 
The bass chorus supporting him was atrocious, singing off 
the key in the most ragged manner. The orchestra, of which 
I expected much, was unfinished and over-loud. Mr. Stein- 
dorff had much to contend with in the principals, with whom 
he had to fight incessantly. The independence of the reeds 
in the numerous obligatos for oboe and bassoon was not 
checked and subdued, and in the later phases of the "O 
terra addio" the strings were smothered and the instru- 
mental values not conserved. A lack of restraint char- 
acterized the ensembles, and resulted in a promiscuous yell- 
ing, and there seemed to be no one to control the tendency 
of all the principals to take the center of the stage on tip-toe 
and do his or her loudest. The humors of the stage man- 
agement, were manifold, and was most amazing in the in- 
excusably ludicrous conduct of the triumphal entry. So 
much for the facts concerning the performance of "Aida" on 
Monday night. 

* * * 

"Rigoletto" was given on Tuesday night with the same 
cast as iast year. Ferarri sings and acts the role of the 
jester strongly, and Repetto is a most amiable Giida. Rtisso 
takes all sorts of liberties with the music, but one is ready to 
forgive him when he sings "La donna e mobile" with an in- 
terpolated cadenza, and puts so much spirit into it. Polletini 
acts the part of Magdalena particularly well; I cannot recall 
anyone who does it better. Nicolini is at his best as Spara- 
tucile. 

* * * 

Mr. James Neill and his industrious company have returned, 
and this week gave us for the first time the Jones play, 
"The Case of Rebellious Susan." A play as recent as this 
and as fresh in spirit, is worthy of our attention, and it is 
well to find it as agreeably done as by the Neills. James of 
that ilk himself has a central character in Sir Richard Kato 
which, if not completely Londonian, is still made interesting 
in his hands. The hyper-perfection of reserve which he has 
cultivated so assiduously is maintained with a consistency 
that compels a certain sort of admiration which is quite 
a pa it from the question of his fitness for the role. Mr. Neill's 
quiessence is a mannerism, and I always find his casual 
treatment of ordinary dialogue quite interesting without con- 
sidering his aims at characterization or portraiture. He is 
so uniform in his versatility that one never finds him either 
sensationally brilliant, or patently inadequate. Above all 
things he is careful, but his merit is entirely negative, and 
in the long run one finds oneself receiving no impression 
from his acting whatever other than that which is made by 
his characteristic manner — his always subdued and some- 
times faint personality. A native mimetic skill and a rare 
conscientiousness result in the portrayal by this unique 
player of widely various characters in a manner that, if 
unsatisfying, is never dissatisfying; and so it is with his 
Richard Kato, which part demands no more than confidence 
and ease, with both of which qualities Mr. Neill is abundantly 
supplied. "The Case of Rebellious Susan" is modern in 
manner and adroitly satirical. It requires no more acting 
than other English drawing-room comedies, and like other 
English drawing-room comedies it depends more upon what 
the play people say than in any interest that may inhere in 
the plot. Mr. George Bloomquest as Fergusson Pybos hits 
off cleverly a rather unusual comedy part, that of a sensi- 
tive, epicene esthete who is married to a strong-minded 
woman. Louise Brounell, who has this role, is capital. 
Edythe Chapman and Julia Dean are humorously feminine, 
and both act with grace and refinement and the falling in- 
flection which is the vocal embodiment of all that is Neiil. 

* * * 

Florence Roberts reproduced "The Adventures of Nell 



August 3, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



| in stnklns the 

tiii- play ph.s her ■ bunch of opportunities, 

and h ■ and moderate abandon conspire to 

jrable. The play has no stability 

save Insomuch as a number of rather good situations help 

to sustain an Interest in the titular character. Of the sup- 

Webster makes a tit <>f the part of Haynes, 
and Mr. White Whittlesey as Charles 11 is. as usual, depend- 
able. The rest of the cast suffers subsidence in small parts. 
The setting is unostentatious, but good, after the habitual 
manner of the Alcazar. 

* • • 

The Orpheum has nothing stunning to offer unless it be 
Alexandra Dagmar. who is lulld as "the most stunning 
woman on the vaudeville stage. That is rather a hard bill 
to fill, but Miss Dagmar is large enough and something to 
The turn, consisting of songs that sound like London. 
Is novel In a conventional sort of way, and she does some 
astonishingly varied vocalization, including a Wagnerian 
aria and a Tyrolean jodel. The Molasso-Salvaggi Troupe 
perform extravagant round dances in a style that takes 
breath. They exceed in dexterity and nimbleness any 
terpsb hoi can acrobats that have ever twnied among us. 
Two of them swing one another alternately at aim's length 
in the air. and keep time and step to the music, until they 
resemble streamers in a high wind — which is the best I can 
do to describe something that is quite indescribable. 

* * * 

The organ recital of H. J. Stewart. Mus. Doc. Oxon., 
which took place at the Mechanics' Pavilion last Saturday 
afternoon, drew what would have been a packed house in 
any other auditorium in the city. The announcement that 
Dr. Stewart, before his imminent departure for Boston, 
where he is to take charge of the choir of Trinity Church, 
would give two programmes on the great Stanford organ, 
proved potent as an attraction to an audience that was com- 
plimentary in its size and appreciation. Dr. Stewart, since 
his advent at the Advent, has labored variously and with 
zeal to elevate the musical tone of the community. To 
his distinction as an organist has been added the interest 
at a number of compositions by him, that were first heard 
in this city. 

The programme last Saturday was one that Dr. Stewart 
gave at the Buffalo Exposition with great success. The 
Sonata No. 1 of Guilmant, especially the second movement 
i pastorale) was exquisitely given. The "Cantaline Nup- 
tiale," uy Dubois, and Grisen's "Communion in F," were given 
with refinement, the sanctity of the latter being finely ex- 
pressed in tempo and treatment. The Chopin "Polonaise in 
A," not the hackneyed one, was hard to get hold of, and of 
the Wagner items the fire scene of "Di Walkuere" was 
the best, or rather the least disappointing in point of or- 
chestral effect. The Kaiser March, with which the pro- 
gramme ended, was out of all enduring on the organ, and 
tedious beyond words. The inhospitable barn in which the 
concert took place interfered greatly with one's enjoyment 
of the music, both in its poor acoustic properties, and in its 
effect upon the mind. 

PORTER GARNETT. 

* * * 

Next Monday evening, at the Columbia, Mr. Charles Froh- 
man's Empire Theatre Company will present "Mrs. Dane's 
Defense." The people in the company include Mr. Charles 
Richman, Margaret Anglin, Ethel Hornick, Margaret Dale, 
May Brook, Messrs. W. H. Crompton, E. Backus, Stanley 
Dark, George Osbourne, Jr., Wallace Woisley, Frank Brown- 
lee and George Sylvester. 

* * * 

At the Tivoli next week "Trovatore" and "Lucia" will al- 
ternate. Salassa will be cast as Di Luna in "Trovatore" and 
Ferarri and Repetto will be in the cast of "Lucia." 
* * * 

Canaille, Dumas' consumptive heroine, whose portrayal 
Florence Roberts undertook last season, will he revived 
next week at the Alcazar by the popular star, who will be 
supported by Mr. White Whittlesey and the stock company 
installed there. Lucius Henderson will essay the role of 
the Count De Varville. The balance of the cast will include 
Mr. Barton Hill, Mr. Carlyle Moore, Mr. Paul Gerson, Marie 
Howe, Georgie Cooper, Agnes Ranken, and Lillian Armsby. 



"If you 

see ,i thing too often, you no 

onger see it ; if you hear a 

thing tun often, you no longer 

hear it." Perhaps you've seen 

ami heard so much <>f"Pearline ' 
that it makes no impression 
1 lien it's time to wake up and look 
about and see what Pearline is doing for other 
women. It skives the easiest, quickest, most 
economical washing and cleaning. em 




upon you. 



The following new numbers are on the Orpheum's next 
week's bill: Hill & Silvainy, bicyclists and unicyclists, 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Kelccy in Edmund Daly's plnylet, "The 
Trust," Mr. Oscar P. Sisson and Miss Esther Wallace in 
"My Wife's Presents," the Standard Colored Quartette, the 
musical Esmonds, and Alexandra JJagmar. 



St. Louis A. B. C. Bohemian, the king of all bottled 

beers, brewed from the finest Canadian Barley and imported 
Bohemian Hops. 



They know you are a judge of good whiskey when you call for Jesse 
Moore at Hie bar. 



Gottlob, Marx & Co.. 

Lessees and Mtwmiren 



Belasco ATHAiiL, Manager**. 

Phone Main 254 



Columbia Theatre 

Two Wteks. beglnnng MONDAY, Aug 5. Charles Frohnian's 

EMPIRE THEATRE COMPANY 

Direct from the Empire Theatre, New York, presenting Henry 
Arthur Jones' greatest play, 

MRS. DANE'S DEFENSE 

As seen all last season at the Empire Theatre. 

Alcazar Theatre. 

Commencing Monday, August 5th. 

FLORENCE ROBERTS 

Supported by White Whittlesey and the Alcazar Stock Company, 
in a Revival of the Favorite Drama, 

GAMILLE 

Her Greatest Characterization. 

Next Week— Aug. 12. Charlotte Thompson's New Play, "silver- 
Mounted Harness." 

Only Matinee — Saturday- Seats on sale six days in advance. 
Prices— 15c, 25c, 35c, 50c. and 75c 

Mas. Ernestine Keeling, 

Proprietor and Manager. 
Monday, August 6lh. Seeord Week and Enormous Success- The 
GRAND OPERA SEASON. Verdi's most popular work. 



Tivoli Opera House. 



IL TROUATORE 

Monday, Wednesday, Friday. Saturday, 
Donizetti's Ly rie Gem, 

LUGIA DI LAMMERMOOR 

Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday matinee, and Sunday. 

Evenings at 8. Malinee Saturday at 2. 

Popular prices— 25. 50, and 75 cents. Telephone Bush 9. 

1 San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. 

HP heU m . O'Farrell St.. between Stockton and Powell streets. 
Week beginning Sunday matinee, August 4th. Hill & silvainy, Mr. 
& Mrs. Alfred Kelcey, Oscar P. Sisson, Ester Wallace & Co., The Es- 
mond-, Molasso-Salvaggi Troupe, Stanton & Modena, The Bio- 
graph, and 

ALEXANDRA DAGMAR 

Reserved Seats 25c.; balcony 10c; opera chairs and box Meats. 50. 
Matluees Wednesday. Saturday, and Sunday- 



After the Theatre 



Go where the crowd goes — to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchlesa string band and enjoy the finest 

wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zinkand Is society's gathering place after the theatre 

over 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 3, 1901. 




Library&abk 




It is safe to assume that basket-weaving 
Indian Basketry, antedates textile weaving, and that the 

soft art which furnishes us with so 
many of the comforts and some of the luxuries of life has 
been handed down to us by our savage ancestry in their 
basketry and kindred work. But a comparatively few years 
ago the interest in the arts and industries of our aboriginal 
tribes was confined largely to scientific societies, and the 
illustrative collections of the products of these arts and in- 
dustries to museums, but to-day the collectors of Indian bas- 
kets are many, and there is an ever-growing demand for in- 
creased knowledge of the social, tribal, medicinal, and religi- 
ous customs of the peoples to whom we owe one of the most 
common and useful of the domestic arts. With the very laud- 
able purpose of aiding in popularizing the study of the inter- 
esting products of the Amerind — a new word coined by Major 
J. W. Powell, of the U. S. Bureau of Ethnology to desig- 
nate the North American aborigine — Mr. George Wharton 
James of Pasadena, author of "In and Around the Grand 
Canyon," "Missions and Mission Indians of California," 
"Nature Sermons," etc., has published under the title "In- 
dian Basketry," a most interesting and comprehensive work 
on the subject. The book is profusely illustrated, and is 
of real value both archeologically and ethnologically. It is 
profusely illustrated, and is full of suggestive and useful 
ideas for the intelligent collector of Indian baskets. The 
engravings of the Government were placed at the writer's 
disposal, and many of the detailed descriptions of the bas- 
kets were taken verbatim from Professor Mason's papers 
which appear in the reports of tne Smithsonian Institution. 
The work of the Indians of the South-west, the Pacific States, 
and Alaska, is carefully considered. In an unoccupied field 
of popular literature, Mr. Wharton is a very successful pio- 
neer. The materials used for the basketry of any particular 
people is in a great measure determined by that people's 
environment. The Hopi use yucca and fine grass; the 
Paiutis a coarse fibre; the Havasupals, willows; the South- 
ern California Indians, tule root and squaw weed; the Monos 
other tender shoots, roots and fibres; the Pomas something 
different; and the tribes further north, the bark of the cedar 
and the root of the spruce. Of the weary and toilsome climb 
to distant mountain tops for rare and beautiful grasses that 
only adorn the face of nature in the loftiest solitudes, of 
the preliminary work, where not only hands but teeth and 
toe-nail play an important part, of the great care required 
in the handling of the lighter and softer grasses, of the hun- 
dreds of thousands of stitches in a single basket, stitches 
that do not show the slightest variation in size, of the in- 
finite patience of the weaver, and of the simplicity of the 
basket-makers' tools, generally a bone awl or stiletto — how 
little the average purchaser thinks as he buys for a few or 
many dollars, as the case may be, the basket that has taken 
weeks or months, sometimes years, to make. It is well 
to remember that however exorbitant the price may appear, 
value received is the rule if labor, eye-taxing labor, is taken 
into consideration. It would indeed be a calamity if the in- 
dustrial art of basket-making were allowed to die, and 
Mr. James believes that intelligent, concentrated effort can 
save it. He says: "On every reservation, in every school 
under the control of the Government, arrangements should 
be made instantly to gather together all the old majellas 
and give them adequate compensation for teaching the young 
girls all the various branches of the art. The materials used, 
the proper time to gather them, the best methods of prepar- 
ing them, the various mineral and vegetable dyes, the best 
mordants, the various styles of weaves, the many and varied 
shapes, the sources and origins of the wonderful diversity of 
design, all these things should be taught. Then let intelligent 
white people study the subject and suggest improved methods 
of growing, harvesting and preparing the necessary material. 
Let scientific culture direct new methods of securing the 



permanent and beautiful colors of the native dyes, and then 
leave the Indian alone to follow the bent of her own mind, 
as far as shape, design and symbolism are concerned. It 
would not be long, these suggestions carried out, ere there 
would oe a revival of the art; a true renaissance, from which 
Indian and white would alike profit in more important ways 
than the merely financial, good though that alone would be." 

Henry Malkan, Publisher, New York. Price, $2.50. 

Mr. R. O. Prowse has written in "Voysey" a 

Voysey. story that does not rely in the least on incident 
for its dramatic effect. It is entirely devoted to 
personalities and contains some excellent character studies, 
albeit its theme is a time-worn and disagreeable one. The 
miserably vulgar adventure of a man with a married woman, 
without even the excuse that a great passion gives, on his 
side at least, is the subject the author has chosen to discuss 
at length through four hundred pages of a book that is a 
lather remarkable analysis of the thoughts and feelings and 
experiences of two people who run ail the gamut of such 
a love's illusions, vanities and limitations. Mr. Prowse is 
evidently a close student of human nature, with a wonderful 
insight into the complexities of the human heart. The 
thoughtful reader, notwithstanding the unwholesome motif 
of the book, cannot fail to be impressed to an unusual de- 
gree by the individual note. One or two quotations will give 
some idea of its style: "In passion between men and 
women the chances are never even, the play can never be 
made fair; a woman has too much against her; a man may 
put down but a counter or two, when a woman plays for her 
soul. For this reason the account between them is one that 
can never be closed, it is a page that can never be turned." 
And again: "In the long run the preachers, no doubt, are 
right: 'Moral qualities rule the world'; chaos waits on the 
withdrawal of their supremacy; but the word of the 
preacher does not cover, and has never covered, the whole 
ground of human nature. Man is a difficult, perverse, com- 
plex being, a being of many instincts and many impulses, 
of many humors and many moods, who has never accepted 
any permanent limitation in the variety of his points of 
view, who has always believed that in the large scheme of 
things his unregenerate side, too, has its value — and has 
also its right to expression. The common-sense of the 
world nas always protested, in life and in literature, against 
the being righteous over-much." Such are some of the 
thoughts that flit through Bertie Voysey's brain in the course 
of his amorous adventure. The last chapter is artistically 
handled, and to the end the subjective action is admirably 
carried out. 

The Macmillan Company, Publishers, New York, Price, 
$1.50. 

In a booklet entitled "The Scar- 

The Scarlet Huntsman, let Huntsman," Mr. Walter 
Cayley Belt has gathered to- 
gether some twenty poems (?) the initial one of which gives 
its name to the little volume. There is nothing meritorious 
in any of the verse. "The Man Without the Hoe" embodies 
some good thought, but what would Mr. Markham say to its 
closing line which runs as follows: 

"God pity him! — The Man Without the Hoe!" 

The La Grande Journal, Oregon, 1901. Price 50 cents. 
"The Cruise of the Petrel," by T. Jenkins Haynes, author 
of "The Windjammers," is quite as good as its predecessor, 
and will find many readers. 

McClure, Phillips & Co., Publishers, New York, Price, $1.25. 

"John G. Whittier," by Richard Burton, is the latest issue 
in the Beacon Biography Series. 

Small, Maynard & Co., Publishers, Boston, Price, 75 cents. 



Don't beat your wife and don't beat your carpet. In- 
stead, surprise you wife by sending the carpet to Spaulding's 
Carpet Cleaning Works, 353 Tehama street. It will come 
back looking like a new one. They clean carpets thoroughly 
without injuring the fabric, and do all work promptly. 
Goods called for and delivered. Give them a trial. 



BOOKS REVIEWED IN THIS PAPER 
Can be Obtained at 



Robertson's 



126. Post Street 



Auguit ., 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




'Hear the CrierKWhat the devil art thou" ', 
" Oet tha t will play the devil, sir, with you ' 






In the present spat lamentable of Sampson anrl of Schley 
A just ana cool spectator of the wordy fray am I, 

Making of the controversy not a comment good or bad — 
Except the observation that Maclay's a blatant cad. 

But my keen commercial instinct makes me chuckle as I say. 
"What a splendid advertisement for the volume of Maclay!" 

Are the papers dilatory in the matter of getting news, or 
have the people of Truckee unanimously agreed to suppress 
all information of the lawlessness now reigning there? 
From all accounts crime of every kind is rampant at 
Truckee. The town is -vide open as far as gambling is 
concerned, and murder is so common as to cause hardly any 
comment. Within a month several bodies of people who 
had met violent deaths have been found in the river near 
the town, but no efforts have been made to apprehend the 
murderers. The town is full of villainous characters, and 
the law-abiding element seems to be either cowed or in- 
different. Only a short time ago a young man who had been 
working out in the country came into Truckee with several 
hundred dollars in his possession. He disappeared, and a 
few days later his body was found in the river. A notorious 
character left town at the same time, and there seemed no 
doubt in any one's mind that he was the guilty one. But no 
efforts -,vere made to apprehend him. The most surprising 
part of the whole affair is the absolute silence of the daily 
papers in regard to these happenings. 

What is there in a strike that brings out all the bad there 
is in man, and fills him with the spirit of riot and destruc- 
tion? A pessimist might have looked on the strike demon- 
stration last week and declared the woeful adage that the 
many are incapable of self-government as a proven fact. 
There was a scene at Sixth and Folsom streets the other day 
that approached in wildness an incident of the French Revo- 
lution. A cask of claret fell from a wagon driven by a non- 
union teamster. It had hardly touched the street before the 
bung was knocked out, and people in the neighborhood — 
mostly the families of strikers — gathered with cans, buck- 
ets, pitchers, bottles and even cups, and for hours after for- 
got strike troubles and domestic worries. John Michaels, 
too, caught the riot spirit, and, while drunk, tried to drown 
his wife and children in the bay. While the police are off 
along the water-front protecting teamsters from the union 
bullies, footpads slug and strangle as they please, and burg- 
lars are entering residences with the sang froid of evening 
callers. Altogether it is a delightful situation. 

I, the Crier, do not want to be regarded as a knocker. My 
mission is to ferret out evil, lash those responsible, and call 
the attention of those in authority. I've nothing else to do, 
consequently can discover many things that the police would 
never find out. For instance, there has heen much talk, agita- 
' tion and legislation in regard to the side entrances of sa- 
loons. But during all the controversy nothing has been said 
about the side business done at the combination saloon and 
groceries. In nearly every grocery store with a saloon 
' attachment In this town of ours, there is a booth formed by 
boxes of soap, canned tomatoes, prunes, etc. There the 
housewives of the neighborhood repair when they want a 
little stimulant, and there, late at night, meery laughter, and 
the clink of glasses may be heard. And it's all so open for 
the patrons, too. You walk right in at the front door of the 
grocery, step around a pile of boxes — and there you are. 
If the police are not busy, they might take this matter in 
hand. ■ 

When you see a young man wearing salks 
That rattle and bang when he walks, 

You can make up your mind 

That he isn't refined. 
It's wrong to have footwear that talks. 



Stand aside and let the Crier twirl his lash. Faith, tD 
need, and plenty. I thought the limit ..f absurdity and ran 
dallam had bean readied when it was proposed to Unlit 
losemlte Valley by electricity, Bui there are even 
Bublime heights. There are even more absurd randale 
than the Yosemite Commissioners. The Board of V 

ag to paint the new City Hall, a Bandstone building thai 
was never made for paint. Though thai DUlldin 
mensely more than it is worth, it is not so bad outside as In. 
Broadly speaking it is a great gray mass thai adds dignity 
to the city. How will it look with a coat of cream-colored 
paint on it? How would the moon look striped with red? 
How would a comet look with ribbons tied to its tail? No 
worse than our new City Hall will look when the painters 
get through with it. Is there no hope at all for San Fran- 
cisco? Must it be forever known as a city where art is 
smothered and vulgarity reigns? Gild the trees in the Park, 
put mora advertisements on the Donahue Fountain, put "Wel- 
come" over the door of the Morgue — but do not paint the new 
City Hall. Our children and our childrens' children would 
weep at the shame of our memory. 
Oh, young Lochinvar has come out of the north 
He's chinking his shekels for all that he's worth, 
His clothes are the finest that* you can suggest. 
And he wears eighteen diamonds displayed on his chest. 

He hasn't got rich in the Klondike, oh no! 
The snap that he's had makes the Klondike look slow; 
At Reno he's been, where his pockets were filled — 
For Loch is a preacher at marriage well-skilled. 

I am glad that the Southern Pacific Company's committee 
has decided to give the ferry boat bars at least a thirty days' 
lease of life. Not that I have any personal interest in the 
drinks concocted on the boats — perish the thought! (I carry 
my own bottle). But it grieves my gentle soul to see the 
merry gentlemen from Oakland, Alameda and Berkeley 
crossing on the five o'clock boat with never a drink to cheer 
their evening hours. There are plenty of gentlemen engaged 
in business in this city and living across the bay who have 
been drawing comfort from those bars for the past forty 
years. After a hard day's work it is likely that an Oakland 
dweller may need a "bracer" before dinner, and it is very 
unlikely that during the fifteen minutes allowed on the 
boat he could get a drop more than enough. In behalf of 
friends in Oakland and vicinity, I congratulate the com- 
mittee 3a their stand and hope that Mr. Hays will see fit to 
prolong the life of the ferry-boat cocktail. 

A case-tried lawyer once said to me: "You do not have 
to wait until the end of a trial to learn what the finish will 
be." I was very callow at that time, so I did not fully appre- 
ciate the force of the old fellow's remarks ; but a little experi- 
ence in courts and lawyers has fully explained to me what 
he meant. It is only necessary to study the defense in the 
Kluge-Sutro case to see that the heirs have a slender chance 
against the claims of Mrs. Kluge-Sutro. Mrs. Sutro has a 
wonderfully strong case, for which she has made perfect pre- 
parations; the defense has a wonderfully weak case, of which 
they have not made the best, simply because there was no 
best to be made. The attorneys for the heirs will have to 
get remarkably active if they expect to make anything but a 
pitiable showing on August 15th, when the case will be 
called. The Sutros will owe it to the public to explain why 
the widow's plain rights were contested at all. 

It is too bad that Barbary will insist upon extending its 
coast-line. Upper Kearny street is popularly supposed to 
mark the confines of that perilous shore, and if it must be, 
why can it not stay put? It is no less than a piece of gigan- 
tic impudence that the Baldwin Annex should occupy its 
present location on a strip of Market street that is valuable 
enough to dedicate to business that is at least respect- 
able. "Tough Tiffany," the proprietor of this ill-kept temple 
of chance, is a man of considerable means, and of enough 
business sagacity to see that he has a good location to trap 
and rob the farmer, so long as the police and the public are 
good-natured enough to tolerate his little game. That good 
nature on which "Tough Tiffany" relies is one of San Fran- 
cisco's most fatal vices, and nowhere else but in a mining 
camp would Tiffany's gambling hell be allowed to flaunt its 
immorality in the very heart of the business section. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 3, 1901. 




Weddings are again to the fore this week. On Wednesday 
afternoon the marriage of Miss Frances Baldwin and Mr. 
Sheffield Sanhorn was solemnized at the home of the bride's 
mother, Mrs. A. B. Baldwin, on Steiner street, the Rev. 
John Hemphill tying the nuptial knot in the presence of a 
large number of guests, who afterwards partook of an 
elaborate dinner. The fair bride was attended by Miss Mar- 
guerite Sawyer as maid of honor, and Mr. H. Parmlee, who 
came all the way from New Haven for the purpose, officiated 
as the groom's best man. 

This morning St. Ignatius church on Van Ness avenue 
will witness the marriage ceremony of Miss Ada White and 
Captain J. C. Castner, TJ. S. A. They will spend their honey- 
moon in California, and sail for the Philippines on Septem- 
ber 1st 

Miss Bessie Gage, whose marriage to Mr. W. H. Richard- 
son will be one of Oakland's social events next week, has 
been the recipient of many little attentions on the part of 
her friends, several dinners and luncheons having been given 
in her honor both in Oakland and San Francisco during the 
past ten days. Among the prettiest of them was the dinner 
given on Tuesday evening by Miss Chrissie Taft (who will 
be one of the bridesmaids) to the bride-elect, and those who 
are to tike part in next Tuesday's ceremony. White, green 
and pink were the colors used for the floral decorations, of 
which an odd conceit were the three wedding bells sus- 
pended over the table at which the guests were seated. The 
wedding will take place at the Gage residence on Harrison 
street, Oakland, next Tuesday evening. 

Another pretty entertainment in Oakland was the dinner 
given by Mrs. Ginn last Sunday in honor of Mr. Sheffield 
Sanborn and his bride-elect, Miss Frances Baldwin, the 
guests including the other members of last Wednesday's 
bridal party. 

One of the earliest announcements of the week was the 
engagement of Miss Florence Deming and Mr. Charles 
K. Harley, which was made known last Monday. October Is 
the month named for their wedding. 

Mrs. iileanor Martin has been trying to break the monot- 
ony reigning in social circles with some of those dainty 
dinners of which she is so fond. Half a score or less 
of friends well suited to each other enjoyed the delicious 
menu, the sparkling wines, and the flow of wit, all of which 
are such marked features of her little gatherings. 

Mrs. Henry Wetherbee is being extensively feted by her 
friends on both sides of the bay, all of whom are delighted 
to welcome her back again from her travel in foreign parts. 

Most of the summer resorts are still holding their own, 
although Tahoe, Del Monte, and the Hotel Rafael, are prob- 
ably those most favored. This is the pleasantest time of the 
year at Lake Tahoe, and Del Monte is preparing for the 
rush about to set In. There is a good deal of excitement 
felt at San Rafael over the projected paper chase, which is 
to be run there towards the end of this month, when, 'tis 
said, such crack "cross-country" riders as Messrs. Walter 
Hobart, Charley Baldwin, Ed Beylard, Frank Carolan, and 
the rest of the Blingum set, Including Prince PoniatowskI, 
will take part. Just at present bowls divide the honors with 
golf, and bowling contests have become quite a fad at 
the Hotel Rafael. Mr. and Mrs. William Gerstle were the 
winners of the Benedicts' cup at the golf tournament played 
on the San Rafael links last Saturday. 

Memories of the gala times of the '80 decade and the 
prominent part taken in the festivities of the day by "Com- 
pany G," have been revived by the visit to San Francisco 
of Mr. L. W. Mix, who as its Captain was first and foremost 
In all the gay doings of that period. Mr. Mix is now a resi- 
dent of Mexico, and is here on a business trip, remaining 
to take part In the Bohemian Club midsummer jinks at 
Guerneville. 



Alas, that the Tevis mansion should have a still further 
set-back in re-opening its once-hospitable doors, and Miss 
Florence Breckenridge is again being commiserated by her 
friends for the added delay to her "coming out," which will 
now probably never take place formally. There is a bare 
possibility of our soon seeing Miss Florence with Mrs. 
Sharon, who is anxious to pay her mother, Mrs. Sue Tevis, a 
visit, out there is as yet no certainty of a consummation so 
greatly wished by Mrs. Sharon's friends in San Francisco. 

With the farewell organ recitals of Dr. Stewart and the 
opening of the Tivoli grand opera season music has been a 
prominent feature with us this week. Apropos of the latter 
there was a large outpouring of society at the Tivoli on 
Monday night to welcome the song birds, most of whom 
are old friends, and the attendance during the week has 
elicited the remark, "Who would have thought there were 
so many people in town?" That this is a fact is evidenced 
by the long list of society folk back in town from summer 
outing, though a goodly proportion of them will be off 
again to Del Monte in a day or two to remain there during 
August. Among recent arrivals in town include Mrs. Low 
and Miss Flora, Miss Jenny Flood, Captain and Mrs. Collier, 
Mrs. Molly Latham, Miss Edith McBean, Miss Kate Gunn, 
the Misses Hager, Mrs. Ralph Harrison, Mrs. McClung and 
her two daughters, Miss Susie Blanding, Mrs. Blair and Miss 
Jennie, Mrs. and Miss Kittle. Mrs. J. D. Spreckels, Misses 
Lillie and Grace Spreckels, Miss Maye Coburn, Mr. and Mrs. 
Homer King and the Misses Hazel and Genevieve, Mr. and 
Mrs. Maurice Casey, Miss Kate Dillon, Mrs. J. D. Thornton, 
Miss Virginia Thornton, Mr. and Mrs. Claus Spreckels, 

Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Alexander and family arrived from Lake 
Tahoe on Saturday en route to Del Monte, where they will 
spend the greater part of their visit to California. 

Mrs. Gus Spreckels and Miss Lurline will be among the 
most observed of the guests at Del Monte for the week of 
sports, whispers having floated about of the "miracles of 
loveliness" in the way of seaside costumes with which their 
trunks are filled. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Rogers are occupying their new home 
on Vallejo street; Mrs. A. C. Rogers' neice. Miss Horner, 
from Los Angeles, Is visiting her aunt at her residence on 
Broadway. Mrs. Abby M. Parrott returned last Thursday 
from her trip abroad, and is at Baywood. San Mateo. Mrs. 
Younger, who is en route here from Salt Lake, will be joined 
here ere long by her genial husband. Mrs. C. L. Bent will 
be next among the army ladles of whom the Philippines are 
depriving San Francisco society: she expects to sail for 
Manila on the transport leaving here September 16th. Miss 
Rutherford sails for Japan on the 27th, under the chaperon- 
age of Mrs. Buford. 

The W. B. Tubbs and the W. E. Lesters are at Lake Tahoe. 
where they will probably remain during the month of Au- 
gust: General Shatter has been one of the crowd of notables 
at Lake Tahoe, many of whom returned from there this 
week. General S. B. M. Young has gone north to have a 
look over that portion of his command: It Is hoped he will 
return in time to take in a portion at least of the August 
festivities at Del Monte. Among recent arrivals at Rowar- 
dennan were Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Bonny, Miss Eva Castle. 
Judge and Mrs. Haynes. 

Boating parties have been very popular at Highland 
Springs during the last few weeks, the moonlight nights 
adding much to the enjoyment. Hunters who are staying 
there are having fine sport hunting deer. The following 
are among the guests at that resort: Mr. and Mrs. M. E. 
Tobin. Mrs. H. Steil and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. H. Hollman, 
Mr. A. N. Maltble, Miss Whiting. Mr. J. F. Maloney. Mr. 
S. L. Welch, Mr. J. Craig, Mr. M. Herzog, Miss Leona Her- 
zog, Mr. and Mrs. H. M. LIchtenstein. Mr. A. Neuman, Mrs. 
E. M. Downer, Miss T. Bouquet. Mrs. T. F. Foley, Mrs. A. 
Murphy. 

Miss Gladys Joseph, of San Francisco, Is visiting her sister 
and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. M. M. KInstler, of Tucson, 
Arizona. 

Society people are in eager anticipation of the sixth an- 
nual me iting of the Pacific Coast Polo and Pony Racing As- 
sociation, which is to be the great event of the season, 
and which Is to be held at Del Monte from August 19th to 



August 3, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



August 24th. Polo, golf and racing will divide the attention 
of the visitors for six days, and coaching will also be an 
attractive feature of the week. Cups and trophies will be 
contested for, and cash prizes will be given. There i 
ready a large number of visitors at Del Monte, and soeietv 
will be tuere In full force, as will be seen by the following 
representative list of Californians who have engaged rooms 
at the Hotel Del Monte for August: Mr. Cyril Touin. Mr 
Douglas Watson and family, Mr. and Mrs. Grant Selfrldge, 
Mrs. Latham. Mrs. 8. L. Abbott, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Green- 
baum, Mr. John S. Cravens and family. Miss E. Harcourt, 
Miss P. Ives, Mr., Mrs. and Miss Perry Eyre, Mr. and Mrs. W. 
H. Taylor, Mr. Augustus Taylor, Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Tobin, 
Mrs. A. M. Easton, Miss Maye Colburn, Miss Polly Dunn, Mr. 
P. E. Bowles and family, Mr. R. M. Fitzgerald, Mr. \V. H. Tay- 
lor and family. Mr. Thomas Ewing and family, Mr. Alfred 
Tubbs, Mrs. A. L. Tubbs, Mr.. M. S. Grinbaum and family. 
Mrs. Esberg, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Carolan, Princess Ponia- 
towskl, Mrs. W. H. Crocker, Mr. Walter Martin and family, 
Mrs. R. G. Brown, Mr. Augustus Taylor, Mrs. J. A. Whittell, 
Mr. J. J. Moore, Mrs. McCarthy, Miss Wagner, Mr. Fred W. 
McNear, Mr. W. S. Hobart and family, Mrs. W. E. Lester. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Knight White have returned from Inde- 
pendence Lake. Their friends will be pleased to hear that 
Mr. White is much improved in health, and his physician. 
Dr. George J. Bucknall, expects to have him out in two or 
three weeks. 

Mr. Gelett Burgess returned Thursday from a month's 
vacation at Monterey. 

The following are guests at the Hotel Rafael: Miss M. B. 
Greenbaum, Mr. H. M. Stadey, Mr. W. D. Forbes, Miss Van 
Winkle, Mrs. I. Van Winkle, Mr. F. A. Greenwood, Mr. A. A. 
Hanks, Mr. Fred Wilson, Mr. M. A. Latham, Mr. G. L. Cook, 
Mr. H. L. Roosevelt, Mr. H. A. Clark, Miss C. G. Jacks, 
Miss Hiilyer, Mr. Madin Beck and wife, Mr. R. W. Mason, 
Mr. R. V. Webster, and Miss Lilian ratterson. 

The engagement is announced of ivliss Mildred Hollister, 
of San Francisco, and Lieutenant H. S. Brown, of Atlanta, 
Georgia. The wedding will take place in the early fall. 

Rev. J. G. O'Neil, O. P., will deliver a lecture at St. Dom- 
inic's Church, corner of Bush and Sterner streets, under the 
name of the Holy Name Society, on Tuesday evening, Aug- 
ust 27th. 



U. S. Ammunition. 
The popularity of the United States Cartridge Company's 
ammunition is well established. For cleanliness and accur- 
acy it is unequalled and consequently sportsmen give that 
brand the preference. 



Dr. G. E. Sussdorff, who has resumed his practice, is now 
pleasantly located in rooms 6 and 7, 105 Ellis street, near 
Powell. His hours are from ten to twelve and from two to 
four. 



i Grapes, melons, alligator pears, fruit and vegetables 

of all kinds at Omey & Goetting's, stalls 33-34-45-46 Cali- 
fornia Market. Goods always fresh. 



Your complexion will not be harmed by the wind and 

sun if you use Camelline. It keeps the skin wonderfully 
fresh and clear. Camelline is used and endorsed by Mrs. 
Kendall, Mrs. Terry, Adelina Patti, and other notables. 



An excellent orchestra plays at Techau Tavern every 

evening. That adds to the enjoyment of the delicious viands 
served there. It is a popular after-the-theatre place. 



St. Louis A. B. C. Bohemian, the king of all bottled 

beers, brewed from the finest Canadian Barley and imported 
Bohemian Hops. 



Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. 

Cooper & Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 



-Southfleld Wellington Coal 
has no superior. Most economical. 



D' 



K 5kln of Beauty Is a Joy forever. 

k R. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM OR MAOICAL BEAUT1FIBR. 

...vr« Tun. I'lmplc*. Freckle*. 
Molfc Patches, Rub nnd Skin Mr 
rii'i'«. iiii'l I'vcry t>U inlwh ( ,n ticftlity. 

un • I •)■ it. - det-aotlon, it hrw ntn.ui ilia 

fcMl i>f .VI yrnrw nnd N *<• luinnli'i** W* 

ia*to It to be sure It I* properly mmlc. 

rVOOepI ii" ■ i "liniliir nnine. 

Or. L. A.fl ;» lady <•( the 

Imui-t.'ii L ii patient): "Ai won tadJai 
will use iiiriu. i reeonunend *Gour- 
auoVs Cream' m the lead harmful <d 

nil the skin iircpurHtiniin." For Halo 
by nil dranlstll and Fanoy-irood« 
Dealers in the United State, Canada* 
and Eur<>i"j. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 
37 Great Jones street. N, Y. 

AUCTION SALE 




REFEREES' SALE 

BY ORDER OF COURT 

Choice Properties 

Monday, August 12th, 1901 

At 12 o'clock noon, at Salesroom of 

G. H. UflBSEN & CO. 

14 MONTGOMERY STREET. 

NO. 813 WASHINGTON ST. 
Southwest corner Washington and Waverly Place, be- 
tween Dupont and Stockton streets. Improvements consist 
of three-story brick building. Rents $166 per month. 

NO. 716 and 718 JACKSON ST. 
North line between Dupont and Stockton streets. Im- 
provements consist of four-story substantial brick building. 
Rents $250 per month. Lot 34:4x13/:6. 

POTRERO. 
The following three pieces are in the vicinity of properties 
recently purchased by the Santa Fe Railroad Company: 

Southeast corner 19th and Wisconsin streets. Lot 135x111. 
irregular. 

POTRERO. 
Northwest corner 19th and Wisconsin streets. Lot 67x165, 
irregular. 

POTRERO. 
Northwest corner 18th and Wisconsin streets. Lot 201x 
152, irregular. 

TOWNSEND STREET. 
Between Fourth and Fifth streets, northwest line, oppo- 
site the Southern Pacific Railroad depot. 

This choice holding suitable for manufacturing and ware- 
house purposes. Lot 60x275, irregular. Two frontages. 
For further particulars apply to Referees: 

J. T. HARMES, 626 Market St. 
G .H. UMBSEN, 14 Montgomery St. 
P. J. SULLIVAN, Parrott Building. 



MRS. M. B. PERLEY 

KERAMIC STUDIO 



TELEPHONE GRANT 4 



Colors and enamels for sale. 
China fired dally. 



Did you say Rye? Then try Jesse Moore Rye— the finest in the world. 



Keramlc Roman Gold, $1.00 per box. 
Agen lor Revelation Kiln. 



Instructions In CHINA PAINTING 
209 A POST 3T.. S, F. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 3, 1901. 






Locker On 




Here is an instance where two authorities on California 
art and architecture came together so forcibly as to rub oft 
some of the paint. 

Mr. Charles Rollo Peters and Mr. Emil Bruguiere, as 
every one ought to know, are having built at Monterey two 
suburban mansions intended to exemplify everything that is 
artistic in California mission architecture. When the idea 
was first hatched, Messrs. Bruguiere and Peters held a con- 
ference and decided that of all the local talent, Mr. Willis 
Polk was the best fitted to design the buildings. So Mr. 
Peters went as an emissary extraordinary to Mr. Polk and 
explaining in full the idea and asked if he, Polk, would be 
willing to undertake the job. 

"Certainly," replied Mr. Polk, with professional firmness, 
"I will design the buildings, but only providing that I am 
given a free hand. Of course I fully appreciate your knowl- 
edge of California buildings, Peters, but if I am to do the 
work I must do it alone without suggestion or alteration." 

The conditions were agreed upon, and the plans were ac- 
cordingly drawn up at once. Several weens later, after the 
buildings were well under way, Mr. Peters again entered 
the Polk sanctum. His step was brisk and his every muscle 
beamed with the excitement of joy. 

"Polk," he said, "I have located a gold mine!" 

"Congratulations," answered Mr. Polk, extending the 
cordial glove. 

"No, it's not the Klondike kind," said the artist, "it's better 
than that. It's a veritable artistic Nome. I have just dis- 
covered a place where we can get all the gennine old Cali- 
fornia roof tiling we want at a nominal figure — think of what 
a bonanza that will be for our adobe palaces at Monterey!" 

"That sounds well," said the architect, "but where are 
those wonderful tilings to be found?" 

"Oh, that's all arranged," said Mr. Peters, "Monterey is 
full of tiles. I have fixed it with the land owners there to 
let me strip all the tiles off the old Spanish houses there. It 
is a great scoop and will cost us almost nothing." 

"Well, my boy," answered Mr. Polk, "before you touch 
those tiles you had better consult with your attorneys and 
see that the laws are so fixed that anyone caught defacing 
the Monterey houses shall be punished to the limit of the 
law." 

"Are you joking?" asked the master of moonscapes. 

"Hardly," replied Mr. Polk. "If you don't make it a capital 
offense to denude those dwellings, before you know it un- 
thinking people will be following your example and in less 
than a year you won't find a barn or a wall that is fit to 
paint in all Monterey. You have made your living and your 
reputation, Peters, thanks to the moonlight and those Mon- 
terey houses. More than this, your contemplated crime is 
an offense to art — a worse one than putting a Queen Anne 
front on the mansion of a dead hidalgo." 

"That is a good lecture," said the artist. 

"It's not a lecture, it's a sermon," replied the architect. 
* * * 

I hope Mr. Peters will forgive me for telling another. 
Really, July seems to be his unlucky month. Mr. Chas. Dick- 
man, the artist, and Mr. R. F. Johnson, mayor of Monterey, 
were to blame for the whole thing, and as the Katzenjammer 
kids would have said, "it was a shame to do it." The two 
above mentioned had just been in a Monterey resort sug- 
gestively called the Brewery, where they had indulged a 
low taste for beer. Coming out they saw a carriage drawn 
up in front of a saloon across Alvarado street. 

"Peters is over there," said Mr. Dickman, "We'll drop in 
and see him." So they entered the saloon and found Mr. 
Peters and a select party of friends about to indulge. The 
latter invited the new-comers to join him but the artist 
and the politician had taken enough for the night p.nrl said 
so. The refusal seemed to hurt Mr. Peters' feelings, and he 
showed it so well that Mr. Dickman began brushing up his 
wits for an excuse. 



"Charlie," he said, "the fact is I wanted to see you on busi- 
ness. Can you spare me a moment?" 

They drew a bit apart and conversed in low tones. 

Says Mr. Dickman: "Have you seen a fellow who was 
looking for you this evening?" 

"No. Who is he?" 

"A picture man from Chicago. He has seen your moon- 
lights in the East. He told me his business. Seems to want 
to make a contract with you for all you can paint for several 
years." 

"If he wants to make a contract, I'm his man," said Mr. 
Peters with just pride. 

"Yes," continued Mr. Dickman, "I told him you could turn 
those things out by the yard. Five or ten a day. He has a 
great many salesmen on the road and allows them 50 cents 
apiece on all they sell. He says he can give you $1.95 for 
every picture you paint." 

" the If he comes near me I'll kill him! ! !" 

thundered Peters through a jet of blue flame. 
• * • 

It is nothing new, this squabbling between the commercial 
and the literary, or quasi-literary, factions in the Bohemian 
Club. In fact, the thing is chronic, and in the early days of 
the club on Sacramento street the oil did not mix with the 
water any better than it does to-day. That was in the 
infancy of the club, when it was not at all prosperous, and it 
happened among other evidences of seediness that the car- 
pet in the main room showed signs of sore distress. Its 
looped and windowed raggedness was positively dangerous 
to life and limb for men who were on occasion so unsteady 
on their pins as these early Bohemians. Something had to 
be done and the obvious something was to bring in some 
more members with money. Nevertheless the hard-shell 
Bohemians resented the infusion of commercial blood. The 
club was going to the dogs, they grumbled. Mr. Dan O'Con- 
nell took very little stock in this sort of talk and often 
amused himself by poking fun at the grumblers. One day 
a group of growlers were lamenting the degeneracy of the 
club when one of the new members happened to come in. 
He was the mild, noiseless sort of person who most resem- 
bles an apology in boots, but all the same the grumblers 
chose to be offended because he did something in butter and 
cheese. 

"There's one of them," they whispered, and they scowled 
at the intruder. 

"Yes," remarked Dan O'Connell, "God bless him, paying 
for the carpet." 

* * • 

Oh, Consul Ho Yow is busy now, 

For he has gone and went, oh, 
And took a flock of racing stock 

To run at Sacramento. 

Each warring tong may skip along 
And shoot and stab and strangle, 

Each gambling den may close again 
While slave-girl owners wrangle; 

But Mr. Ho Yow is busy now 

On sport arid profit bent, oh, 
While following his racing string 

To run at Sacramento, 
t * * 

One would imagine that to be a nice fresh young wife, 
the possessor of several millions, with a handsome soldier- 
lawyer husband who is the cousin of America's only noble- 
man, Lord Fairfax, would mean complete joy, but it does not. 
Mrs. Mary Crocker Harrison is all that, and yet she has her 
woes. 

She has a mother-in-law who not only writes books, 
which are printed merely because she is Mrs. Burton Harri- 
son (and the snobbish public want to read the work of a 
truly society woman), but this mother-in-law insists upon 
being considered a second George Eliot. I myself do not read 
her works, for profanity unnaturally excites the action of my 
heart. Mrs. Harrison does not know this, and so will not 
grieve. 

• When the lady was here as the guest of Mrs. Scott at her 
five hundred million dollar luncheon she told the following 
story : 

"Mr. Burton Harrison was pleading a case in Washington 



August .>, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



IS 



■-■ a learned Judge, who listened with rapt attention 
to each word he said. Mr. Harrison grew eloquent, Battered 
by the judge's great Interest iu him. Mr. Harrison felt that 
be had made the speech of his life, and he had won his 
case. When the Judge approached him after the lawyer 
had completed his argument be was sure of it. 

Mr. Harrison bent his head to catch the approval of the 
judge, who asked him anxiously, "Can you tell me the name 
of Mrs. Harrison's latest book?'' 

Such are the trials of being married to genius, but think 
of being the daughter-in-law of genius. 

• • * 

Mr. Horace Annesly Vachell, in his "Life and Sport on 
the Pacific Slope," devotes a good deal of space to the bring- 
ing up of children, drawing comparisons between English 
and American youngsters favorable to the latter in some 
ways, but mostly unfavorable. Mr. Vachell has a nephew, 
son of Mr. Guy Vachell, of San Jose, who has been brought 
up in the British style, but seems also to have absorbed all 
the good qualities of American children. Little Arthur is 
only four years old, but, following in the footsteps of his 
father, he is an enthusiastic naturalist, well versed on 
bugs and beetles, and is generally to be found carrying an 
old fruit can with a bumble-bee or a collection of well- 
classined spiders in It. Maybe it is this naturalistic habit 
that has made the youngster of an inquiring and philo- 
sophical turn of mind, as was evidenced by a question he 
put to his mother on July 4th. 

Members of the family and others were celebrating the 
national holiday with fireworks. The crackers jarred the 
highly-cultivated nerves of little Arthur somewhat, but he 
evinced great interest in an immense sky-rocket which had 
been reserved for the last. It shot into the air with a great 
roar, leaving a trail of fire behind it. As the last spark 
died out, Arthur turned to his mother, and, in an awed but 
well-modulated voice, inquired: 

"Mother, do you imagine that rocket startled God as 
violently as the crackers did me?" 

* * * 

Mr. Adolph Liebman, whose name is a big one on Pine 
street, is wearing his face in a towel this week. He declares 
hotly that it is neuralgia, and says that if you ask him any 
more questions he will murder you. Several friends who 
were out to Mr. Charles C. Mclver's ranch with Mr. Liebman 
declare that it is not neuralgia, and they don't seem to 
feel nearly so sorry as they ought. While the party was re- 
viewing the beauties of the Mclver ranch they came to a 
large barn where a wasp nest was hanging to the rafters. 

"You are afraid to poke that," said a practical joker, by 
way of a dare. 

"Watch me!" replied the financier, seizing a long pole and 
giving the nest a lusty poke. There was no response from 
within. 

"I did it!" shouted Mr. Liebman, holding the pole aloft 
in the attitude of Von Waldersee on the Chinese wall. At 
that moment the inmates of the nest realized that they had 
been called upon, and responded With enthusiasm. The next 
day "I did it!" was not a necessary explanation. 



Mr. Edward Harmon Sheldon, Secretary of the Oceanic 
Steamship Company, died at tne Lane Hospital in this 
city, Juiy 26th, as the result of an operation for an intes- 
tinal oostruction. Mr. Sheldon was a native of Vermont, 
and was fifty-three years of age. He was a Mason, and 
a prominent member of the Bohemian Club. He left two 
brothers, a sister and a mother, all living in the East. 



St. Louis A. B. C. Bohemian, the king of all bottled 

beers, brewed from the finest Canadian Barley and imported 
Bohemian Hops. 



Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 

nrespoison oak and all skin diseases. Sold by all druggists. 

St. Louis A. B. C. Bohemian, the king of all bottled 

beers, brewed from the finest Canadian Barley and imported 
Bohemian Hops. 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing 

syrup" for your children while teething. 



KNOX'S GELATINE 



KN-O-X K-N-O-X KNOX K'N'O'X 

This is the exact name that must 
be on every package of gelatine you 
buy if you want to be sure that it is 
the best. 

Do not allow substitutes to be 
palmed off on you. They may be a 
little cheaper in price, and are a whole 
lot cheaper in qual- 
ity. 

I doubt if there is a good 
grocer who does not carry 
in stock the Gelatine marked 
K-N-O-X. If you should hear 
of one, send me his name, 
and I will mail free my book 
of seventy "Dainty Des- 
serts for Dainty People." 

CHAS. B. KNOX, 91 Knox 
Avenue, Johnstown, N. Y. 




DR. G. E. SUSSDORFF 

Late Superintendent Physician City and County Hospital. 

Liquor and Morphine Habits. Mental and Nervous Diseases. Twenty 
years experience- Patients treated at their home if desired. 



Office— Rooms 6 and 7 Glasgow BIdg., 
105 Ellis street, near Powell. 



Hours 10 to 12 m, 2 to 4 p.m. 



Joseph Gillott's Steel Pens, , ™ awa ^&«}o.im 

"Grand Prix" Paris, 1900. The Highest Possible 
Award- These pens are " the best In the world." 
Sole agent for the United State?. 
Mb. Henet Hob, 91 John street. New York. 
Sold by all stationers. 

A. B, TREADWELL Attorneyat-Law 

(Formerly Judge Police Court No. i', 
HAS RESUMED PRACTICE at 533 Kearny St., cor. Sacramento St. 
Al legal business attendedto promptly. 



wm 



Business College 

24 POST STREET 
Illustrated Catalogue Free. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, B10 Montgomery street, 

San Francisco, deals in all kinds of newspaper information, 
business, personal, political, from press of State, Coast, and 
country Tel. Main 10*2. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 3, 1901. 




The Field Assistants of the State Mill- 
Good Work of ing Bureau are making rapid progress 
Mining Bureau, in gathering data for the bulletin on 
copper now in preparation. Assistant 
P. C. Dubois has completed his report on the copper mines 
of Mariposa and Tuolumne Counties, and is now conducting 
his investigations in Calaveras, continuing through to Ama- 
dor, El Dorado, and Placer. Assistant J. H. Tibbets has com- 
pleted his work in Humboldt, southwestern Trinity, Lake 
and Mendocino Counties, and is now in Sonoma, proceeding 
thence to Napa and Marin. Professor B\ M. Anderson is at 
present on the McCloud River, completing his investigations 
ir. Shasta. Complete maps of the copper bearing sections of 
Shasta have been prepared, a work of great importance to 
those interested in the industry in that section. Assistant 
G. H. Tweedy has finished work in West ban Diego and 
Riverside, continuing his investigations northward through 
Ventura, Santa Barbara, and San Luis Obispo. Dr. S. Bow- 
ers is now finishing his report on Carizzo Creek, San Diego 
County, where he has investigated the oil possibilities. The 
field of usefulness of the Bureau is being widened in all 
directions, under the direction of State Mineralogist Aubury. 
A position on his staff is no longer a sinecure. People seek- 
ing employment in various branches of the mining industry 
are now filing applications in a register opened at the Bureau 
free of charge, and mine owners in need of help are de 
sired to communicate with the Bureau. The mining library, 
of 4,0i>0 volumes, is now being enlarged, and will be kept 
up to date as much as possible. The draughting department 
is now at work on a mineral map of San Diego, and charting 
the :ocction of mines and mineral deposits is going on as 
fast as the means on hand will permit. The mineral collec- 
tion, one of the finest of the kind in the world, is being con- 
tinually augmented by specimens of all kinds irom all over 
the world, and is well worthy a visit. Citizens can at all 
times nave minerals classified free of charge at the labora- 
tory. The old custom of assaying, etc., which was so badly 
abused in the past, has been stopped. Bulletin 21, on the 
amount and value of the mineral substances produced iiv 
California during 1900, is now ready for distribution on appli- 
cation and payment of four cents. 

Some weeks ago, when the News 

Gas Consolidation an Letter first published the informa- 

Assured Fact. tion for the benefit of its readers 

that a consolidation of the lead- 
ing gas companies of this city was being negotiated, the 
statement was denied on all sides, and statements appeared 
in print from time to time bearing on the subject which were 
both incorrect and misleading. It is hardly necessary now 
to dwell upon this point, as the fact is now apparent that the 
consolidation to which we referred is only a matter of time, 
and the arrangement of details. The "Baltimore Syndi- 
cate" is only part and parcel of the plan of manipulation 
adopted after the deal between Mr. Claus Spreckels and the 
Equitabl .'. There are many ways of killing a cat besides 
hanging, and this is another illustration of the old saying. 
What the result will be for the consumer is of course out of 
the province of discussion at the present time, but it will 
be safe to assume that dividends will again be resumed, and 
stock values will advance again. So far the market has not 
responded to the changes about to take place. 

There has been more activity in Pine 
The Pine-street street during the past week, and a 
Market. chance has been turned to earn a few 

dollars in the fluctuations of some lead- 
ing south-end shares. Confidence has been particularly ac- 
tive, and Challenge has also exhibited considerable strength. 
The prospects in the joint west drift now being run into new 
ground by these companies are more reassuring than they 
have been for months past, and there is every likelihood 
if indications count for anything, that ore will be met with 



before long. The fact has been developed beyond question 
that the ground out west is mineralized, and this is sufficient 
warranty for pressing work in this direction. The im- 
potrance of a strike in this quarter as a factor in rehabili- 
tating business in the speculative market on Pine street 
should not be under-estimated. Con.-Cal.-Virginia has held 
its own bravely, notwithstanding bear attacks, and the out- 
put of o:e continues to swell the company's exchequer. 

The latest news received from 
The Sweepstakes After the Sweepstakes mine, now 
More Ground. operating in the vicinity of 

Weaverville, Trinity County, 
is to the effect that the company intends taking up the Buck- 
eye Ridge Gravel Mine, which lies on the east side of the 
Weaver basin, the Sweepstakes lying on the west side of the 
basin. It is said that this immense body of gravel is no less 
than seven miles long and three miles wide, the gravel run- 
ning about 20 cents to the yard. A very close investigation 
is now being made of the values at different points along 
the channel, and if the rate of 20 cents per cubic yard is 
maintained throughout the 7,800 acres of the claim, the 
property will be added to that of the Sweepstakes. It is 
calculated that to bring water in will cost $500,000. 

The strike of the iron workers 
Mining Suffers from in this city will, it is believed, have 
the Strike. a most injurious effect upon the 

mining industry, as orders for pip- 
ing and machinery are not being carried out according to 
contract. Within the past three weeks the Darien Company, 
a British corporation operating important mining concessions 
in South America, wanted a new set of boilers, and the order 
would have been placed here by the managers of the local 
office had it not been for the strike. Owing to the uncer- 
tainty of a settlement the order had to be sent on to 
England, much to the regret of the agent here. In the same 
way the Sweepstakes Company is being badly handicapped 
by non-arrival of pipe steel according to the plans, and an- 
other big company operating a dredger on Scott river has 
been obliged to shut down, throwing about two hundred men 
out of employment. Complaints of a similar nature are com- 
ing in all over the country, and the general prayer heard 
throughout the mining regions of the State is that the diffi- 
culty wnl soon be settled. 

In the market for local bonds and 
The Local Security securities business has been quiet 
Market. of late, most of the trading having 

been confined to the sugar and gas 
list. The former were weak to some extent, although no di- 
rect reason can be assigned for the movement. The gas 
stocks have been agitated by the constant rumors of com- 
binations, most of which incorrectly state the case. There 
was no other feature in the market outside of the regular 
and steady demand for first-class bonds, which are always 
saleable. 



At 12 o'clock noon, on Monday, August 12th, a referee's 
auction sale of some valuable business and residence prop- 
erty will take place in the salesroom of G. H. Umbsen & Co., 
No. 14 Montgomery street. The parcels to be put under the 
hammer will consist of: A three-story brick building at the 
southwest corner of Washington and Waverly Place, rents 
$133 per month; a four-story brick building at 716 and 718 
Jackson street; three pieces of property near land recently 
purchased by the Santa Fe railroad in the Potrero, situated 
at the Southeast and northwest corners of 19th and Wis- 
consin streets; between Fourth and Fifth streets on Town- 
send street, opposite the Southern Pacific depot. The last 
mentioned lots are especially adapted to factories and ware- 
houses, and cannot but prove a profitable investment to 
manufacturers and mercantile houses. Apply to Mr. J. T. 
Harmes, 626 Market street, Mr. G. H. Umbsen, 14 Montgom- 
eiy street, and Mr. P. J. Sullivan, Parrott building. 



A fine commercial lunch is served every day between 

11 and 2 by Fay & Foster, of the Grand Hotel Caff. 
They have discovered just what suits the taste of particular 
people, and as a consequence they enjoy a large patronage. 



Thkek 1h only one reason why you shouldn't drink Jesse Moore "AA" 
"Whiskey— That's because you have slcned the pledge. 



August 3. 1901. 



8AN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



15 



THE STOCK MARKETS. 
Transaction* on the Producers' Oil Exchange from July 



25th to July 31st: 

Shares 

Stocks. Sold. 

Bear Flag 4.200 

California Standard 1 200 

Four Oil 1,638 

Hanford 1 

Home 490 

Independence 4,000 

Junction 1 ,100 

Kern Oil 60 

Kern RiTer 100 

Lion 2.000 

McKittrick 900 

Monarch of Arizona 3 580 

Monte Cristo 700 

Occidental of West Virginia . .« 1,760 

Oil City Petroleum 400 

Peerless 20 

Petroleum Center 6,450 

SanJoaquin 0. 4. D. Co 305 

West Lake 2,000 

Caribou 100 

Central Point Consolidated 50 

Twenty-Eight 1,100 

Sterling 100 



23 
35 

98 00 

2 00 

10 

9 

5 25 

9 00 



Bangs of 
Prices. 
4 to 
to 

to 
to 

to 

to 
to 

(O 

to 
to 

to 
to 



5 
M 

38 

212« 
11 
10 



24 

20 
1 52}4to 

33 to 

26 

5 00 

1 

7 50 



22 
1 70 
35 



95 
1 60 
1 30 



to 
to 
to 
to 
to 
to 
to 
to 



3 
8 00 



I 22>£to 



Total . . . 



f 32 ,235 



Oros-* 
8ales. 
200 
287 

88 

1,027 

416 

108 

311.1 
900 
166 
216 
711 

1,162 
607 
101 
100 
136 

2,389 

160 

95 

80 

1,440 
122 

% 11,523 



UNLISTED SECURITIES. 

Oil Stocks- 

AND PRICES AS THEY ARE 

For Bale by JOSEPH B. TOPLITZ. 
1000 shares Bachelors 80 01 



California Fortune 21 

California Mutual 15 

California Crude 

Clsiremont 30 

Contra Costa 02 

Del Rey .0 25 

Eclipse 15 

Eleotrio 18 

Famosa Oil & Inv 15 

Grand Pacific 20 

Imperial Cons 05 

Kern River Oil Consolidated 05 

Kern Valley 15 

Lake & Colusa s 00 

Lincoln 07% 

Lion 119 

Mt. Hamilton Land & Oil Co 10 

Mendota 20 

Monarch 22 

Napa and Berryessa 07% 

Occidental S3 

Panochito 05 

Prudential 17% 

Santa Maria 05 

Sovereien 31 

Transfer 04 

Three States 01 

Vernon 15 

Vesuvius 15 

Wellineton 05 

Above prices will show conclusively what immense saving you can make 
in buying shares from undersigned. 

If you own suitable shares in oil or mining companies, and want some of 
those above mentioned, make your selection and I will take yours in ex- 
change. Address 

Joseph B. Toplitz. Stock Broker, 
Member Producers' Oil Exchange. Rooms 9 and 10. 330 Pine street. 



1000 
500 
1000 
500 
4000 
1000 
2000 
500 
150 
1000 
8000 
1000 
500 
50 
1000 
1000 
1000 
500 
1000 
5000 
1000 
2000 
1000 
250 
100 
2500 
500 
1000 
500 
500 



Sold by 
the 
Co. 

JO 75 

50 

1 00 
25 
75 
25 
75 
35 
25 

50 

1 00 
15 
25 
25 

10 00 
50 
75 

15 

1 00 
75 
20 

2 50 
25 
35 
25 
75 
25 
10 
75 
E5 
25 



Eminent Physicians 

are eagerly studying the problem of baby feeding. Borden's 
Eagle Brano. Condensed Milk is recommended by the leading 
family physicians. It is always safe and reliable. Send 10c. 
for "Baby's Diary," 71 Hudson street, N. Y. 



You proclaim yourself a connoisseur when you call for 

J. F. Cutter Whiskey. No better can be found. It has that 
excellent flavor and consistency possessed by no other. 
It is kept by all first-class houses, and is always called for 
by people of discriminating taste and judgment. E. Martin 
& Co., 54 First street, sole agents. 



Don't throw away that old suit of clothes just because 

it happens to be a little stained and rusty. It is far more 
economical to send it to Spaulding's Cleaning and Dyeing 
Establishment, 127 Stockton street, where they will be made 
to look like new. Gloves, neckties, and curtains cleaned. 
Goods called for and delivered. 



St. Louis A. B. C. Bohemian, the king of all bottled 

beers, brewed from the finest Canadian Barley and imported 
Bohemian Hops. 



A utomobiles 



If you want to know how to get one 
write for particulars. 

We build to order Gasoline Auto- 
mobiles, Steam Automobiles and 
Automobile parts. 

Automobiles cared for, repaired 
and delivered on telephone order. 

California Automobile Co., 



Factory, 346 McAllister St. 

Phone Jessie 366. 



Main Office, 222 Sansome St 



200,000 H. P. 




Developed by 

Pelton Wheels 

Operating electrio trans- 
mission plants alone : : : 

Sensitive Regulation 

Send for illustrated catalogue. 

THE 
PELTON WATER WHEEL CO. 

127 Main St. San Francisco. Cab 
143 Liberty St., New York, N.Y. 



and 
Supplies 



nining flachinery 

The Ropp Straight Line Furnace. 

Huntington Centrifugal Roller Mill. 

Bartlett Concentrating Table. 

James Ore Feeder. 

Roger Improved Crushing Rolls. 

Dodge Rock Breakers and Pulverizers. 

Two and Three Stamp Mills. 

Engines, Boilers, Steam and Power Pumps. 

Wood-Working and Iron-Working Machinery. 

PARKE & LACY CO. 21 and 23 Fremont street. 



PENINSULAR PLANISHED 

Steel Ranges 

WILL NOT CRACK OR BREAK, 

Saving at leaBt 25 per cent, in Time and Fuel. They require no 
Blacking, always retain their Lustre, and there i3 no Paint or 
Japan to Burn off. Send for Catalogue, or, better yet, call in and 
eee them. 



MANGRUM & OTTER, Inc. 

581-583 Market St. 



Full Line of Spring Goods 



(Formerly in Mills Building 



In the sick room or on your sideboard Jesse Moore "AA M Whiskey is 
indispensable. 



J. R. SMITH 
Tailoring Co., 

310 Bush St., under Russ House, S. F. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 3, 1901. 



MERE GOSSIP. 



By Betsy Bird. 

Poor Bobbie Grayson! Poor Ned Sheldon! Poor Tevis 
Breckenridge! Truly all the chronicles of the fashionable 
world this week read like obituaries. These bachelors came 
to death by three radically different ways, heart failure, a 
surgical operation, aud self-destruction, and each demise 
produced a terrible shock. It is strange, is it not, in this 
world of snobs, that Mr. Sheldon, the poorest of the three, 
left the most mourners, while Mr. Breckenridge had few who 
grieved for him outside of his own family. This was because 
he avoided people, and recently at Del Monte every one 
was pitying him because he was suffering so intensely from 
melancholia. 

Of the three men who died young Breckenridge probably 
had the most brilliant mind, and might have made much of 
his life had he not chosen to leave it. If he had been forced 
to make his living he might still be alive. He was of a social- 
istic, philosophical nature, and clung to Bryan and his 
theories. 

Mr. Sheldon's death was very sad, for purely by his own 
personality he had made for himself hosts of friends. When 
he was taken to the hospital he was supposed to be suffer- 
ing from appendicitis, and his friends, Messrs. Terry Hamil- 
ton, Gus Costigan, Reddick Duperu. Charlie Mcintosh, and 
Harry Holbrook. waited outside the operating room to hear 
the first news. After three hours and a half they were told 
that Mr. Sheldon had a tumor in the abdomen, and the sur- 
geons dared go no farther lest death result immediately. 
It was a dreadful shock to them, for they had not considered 
the illness so serious. Poor Mr. Sheldon died on the follow- 
ing day. The Rev. Mr. Wilson remained with him until he 
died. 

* * * 

The oirds have been singing it for a long time, and every- 
body has been saying it is true, but now all acknowledge it 
as a fact. Pretty Mrs. Walter Dean is to be a grandmamma, 
for the stork will soon visit the Walter Deans, Jr.. and Emily 
Hager-Dean, the most popular young married woman in San 
Francisco, is to be a mother. That is one of the reasons 
why the Walter Deans have passed the summer in town. 
Not long ago a man explained to me why Emily Hager Dean 
is so popular. Said he: "Her mother was always a leader 
here, as well as a wealthy woman. Her position from baby- 
hood was perfectly secure, so there was no one to whom she 
needed to toady. She was never afraid that if she bowed to 
the wrong person that she would go whirling down into so- 
cial oblivion, consequently she was gracious to all. She has 
an excellent intelligence and tact, and so she is the charm- 
ing woman whom everyone loves." 
» » * 

Mr. Athearne Folger, who married Mrs. Cunningham 
finally, and was always heiress hunting, was engaged to Mrs. 
Dean for twenty-four hours. She accepted him. and then 
she learned things which caused her to break the engage- 
ment immediately. She and Walter were engaged for many 
years, but on account of religious differences the marriage 
did not occur until after the death of Mrs. Hager. Now the 
Hagers and Deans are greatly excited over the prc.-tpeetive 
birth in the family. From her sister-in-law. Mrs. Frank 
Hicks. nf>e Childs. of Los Angeles, as well as both the Hager 
girls and Mrs. Walter Dean, Sr., come the most beautiful 
presents. 

* • * 

The Misses Alice and Ethel Hager are staying at the Pal- 
. ace because of Miss Ethel Hager's health. She has an ag- 
gravated form of heart trouble, and even the fuss and noise 
of a well-regulated house are too much for her heart, for she 
must have absolute repose. The physicians say that unless 
she has perfect quiet she is liable to pass away at any time. 
Her frame is so large that she needs a good strong heart to 
support it. 

* « * 

Sausalito is stirred by the rumored engagement of pretty. 
chic, little Miss Harrison and "Jack" Wilson. He is staying 
at Blithedale this summer, and he finds the Sausalito boat 
?. joy, for it carries Miss Harrison back and forth from San 
Francisco. 



While speaking of Blithedale, I hear that this quiet, re- 
spectable suburb wants no more baseball games. The citi- 
zens of Blithedale have not vet recovered their breath from 
the baseball game between the Little Necked Clams and the 
Poison Ivy teams. It was not only the game itself but the 
dinner which occurred later at Pastori's that raised their 
hair on end. Messrs. Dick Hotaling, Frank Owens, and Red- 
dick Duperu, who dined the actresses, are the prominent 
young society men who offended virtuous Blythedale. 

* • • 

Mr. John Hecksher of New York, who was visiting here a 
few days ago, was a chum of Mr. Pierre Lorillard, and had a 
most remarkable history. It is not often that men fight duels 
in these days, and so Mr. Hecksher is pointed out. everywhere 
as the man who fought the duel with Mr. Winthrop Grey. 
The wife of the latter was the daughter of Colonel Travel's, 
the wittiest man in New York, the grandfather of Mrs. 
Clarence Mackay. Mr. Hecksher was also married, but he 
fell in love with Mrs. Grey, and the upshot of it ail was that 
the men met in a duel. The Greys were divorced. Several 
years afterwards Mrs. Hecksher died, and Mr. Hecksher mar- 
ried Mrs. Grey, who had been living in retirement. The 
Heckshers were most happy together, and since the death of 
the second Mrs. Hecksher only a year ago, "Johnny" Heck- 
sher has been wandering about, flying from a phantom that 
pursues mm, ennui. 

• * * 

General Young has been rumored engaged for many years, 
and the latest young lady who is accredited with intentions 
of becoming the future Mrs. Young is handsome, dashing, 
r -d-headed Miss Cornelia McLanahan, of Washington, D. C. 
She is an heiress, a belle, clever, and has snapped her fingers 
at half a dozen eligible men. She is spending the summer in 
the Catskills with her family. Her father declares that she 
will marry General Young, and she says "No." Miss Mc- 
Lanahan is only about twenty-four, and is a great friend of 
General Young's daughter. He is a handsome man, and if 
any one could make a young wife forget that she is more 
than thirty years the junior of her husband, I think General 
Young is that man. 

* * * 

Mr. Hooker, the millionaire father of the Hooker boys, 
is said to be very "near." and gained considerable notoriety 
about a year ago by disputing with the Assessor. It will 
consequently surprise a lot of people to know that he has 
been giving away large chunks of his property to his children 
and that Osgood has come in for a good share. Mr. Hooker 
is very wise, I think, in not waiting until he dies to be gener- 
ous, as most men do. I hear that Mrs. Osgood is exceedingly 
happy ov?r it. for it was the expectation of herself as well as 
her family that she marry some one of the several million- 
aires who were devoted to her. But it did not happen that 
way. For my part I think she did better than to marry any 
one of them, for Osgood Hooker is a "bully" fellow, and an 
excellent business man, and he is going to he very well off. 

• • * 

It has been denied, and will be denied for many months to 
come, that Miss Dillon, the heiress, is to bestow her hand 
and heart upon Mr. Fred Greenwood, but as my little brother 
says. I am going to make a book on it, and I will give you 
very good odds. There are a lot of men In the race, of all 
sorts and descriptions, but the favorite with Miss Dillon is 
Mr. Greenwood. "Freddy" has about a hundred thousand 
of his own, so he can manage to pay his board bill. Hnless 
I mistake he comes from a pretty good English or Scotch 
family, and some of the children were brought up abroad. 
Notwithstanding that there is nothing decidedly against him. 
he is rather unpopular, and so for a long time it was not 
thought he would have a ghost of a show. Mr. George New- 
hall and Colonel Wilson, because of their position, were said 
to be possible winners, but I have learned this, that a pair 
of big brown eyes and curly hair In the race for an heiress 
will win against wealth and rank combined. Now. if the girl 
were poor I should make a book against brown eyes. I be- 
lieve "Freddy" is not exactly a favorite with the friends and 
advisers of Miss Dillon, but, hang It all. what Is the use of 
having a million if it will not buy you the freedom of marry- 
ing the man of your heart? Life is too short to be wasted 
T have oiten wondered how a man wooes an heiress. Does 
he offer himself to her, or like Victoria must she offer her- 
self? The books of etiquette do not say. 



August 3. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

BANKING. 



17 



London and San Francisco Bank, umiM 

<:< CALIFORNIA STREET. 
BEAD OFFICE— 71 Lombard street. London. 

Capital Authoriied. 12.501.000. Capital Paid Up. |I.«00,000. 

Tnrectora— Henry Goschcn. Chairman. London: Charle* Edward Brother- 
Ion. London: Christian do Online. San Pranciaco: fliarlca Hemcry 
London: John L. Howard. San Francisco: Bcndli Koppol. London : Nor- 
man D. Hideout. San Francisco; Arthur Scrivener. London. 

Inspector of Branches. Guatav Fricderieh. 

Agents In Now York. Messrs. J. P. Morgan A Co. 

BRANCHES: Portland. Oregon : Tacoma, Wash., Seattle. Wash. 

Letters of credit Issued available lor travelers and the purchase ol mer- 
chandise In any city ol the world. Deal in foreign and domestio excha nge 
Accounts of country banks received. Terms on application. 

W. Mackistosh, Manager 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With which is amalgamated The Bank of British Columbia 

HEAD OFFICE-Toronto. 

Paid Up Capital. 18.000,000. Reserve Fund. fc.0O0.0O0. 

Aggregate Resources over $65,000,000. 

Hon. Geo. A. Cox. President; B- E. Walker, General Manager. 

' J. H. Plummer, Asst. General Manager. 

LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St.. E- C. S. Cameron Alexander. Manage 

NEW YORK OFFICE— 16. Exchange Place, Alex. Laird and Wm- Gray. 
Agents. 

ONTARIO: 44 BRANCHES. 

Quebec: Montreal: Manitoba: Winnipeg: Yukon District 
Dawson. White Horse: British Columbia: Atlin, Cranbrook, Fernle 
Greenwood, Kamloops, Nanatmo, Nelson, New Westminster, Rossland 
Sandon, Vancouver, Victoria. In the United States— New York, N. Y. San 
Francisco. Cal- Seattle. Wash. Portland, Ore- Skagtvay, Alaska. 
Bankers In London— The Bank of Scotland: Messrs. Smith. Payne & Smiths 
Bankers in New York— The American Exchange National Bank. 
Agents in Chicago— The Northern Trust Company. Agents in New Orleans. 
—The Commercial National Bank. 
San Franolsoo Office: W alter Powell, Manager. A. Ealns. Asst. Manager 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Cob. Sansohb abt> Sutteb Sts. 

Subscribed Capital (2,600,000 Pald-Up Capital, $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $1,000,000 

HEAD OFFICE— 40 Threadneedle street, London, E. O. 

AGENTS: New York— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank. 

Limited. No. 10 Wall Btreet, N. Y.: Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cle, 17 

Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 

Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

8IG. GREENEBAtTM. O. ALTSOHUL, Managers. 
B. ALTSOHUL, Cashier. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner ol Sansome and Pine Sts., San Francisco 
J a». K . WlLsoir, President Wm. Pierce Johnbon. Vice-President 

Lkwis I. CowoiLL, Cashier F. W. Wolfb, Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL, $500,000 
SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS, $130,000. 
DLREOTORS-James K. Wilson, Win. J Dutton, Wm. Pierce Johnson, Geo 
A Pope, H. E. Huntington. Henry Pierce, C. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS : New York-Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank: 
Chemical National Bank, BoBton— National Bank of the Commonwealth 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co.: Chicago—Continental National Bank. St. Louis 
—The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London-.. 
Brown. Shipley & Co. Parle-Morgan, Harjes & Co. 

Germania Trust Company of San Francisco 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital, $1,000,000 Pald-Up Capital and Reserve, $390,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian, or Trustee. 

Check Accounts of Individuals, firms, and corporations solicited. 

Legal Depository for money In Probate Court proceedings. Interest 
paid ON trust deposits and savings. Lnyestments carefully selected 
for our clients. 

Officers— F. Kronenberg, President; W. A. Frederick, viee-PresIdent: H. 
Brunner. Cashier 

Board of Directors— F. Kronenberg, W, A. Frederick. Fred A. Kubls, E 
A. Denleke, A. G. Wleland, Fred Woerner. J. O. Rued, Fred O. Slebe 
John Rapp. 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cob. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 Paid Up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 8,000,000 Reserve Fund... 700,000 

Agents at New York— J. A W. Sellgman A Co.. 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the world 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange and bullion 
IGN. STELNHABT, P. N. LLLLENTHAL, Managers. 



Security Savings Bank 



222 MONTGOMEBT St., Mills Building. 
Interest paid on deposits. Loans made. 
directors. 

William Alvord 8. L. Abbot, Jr. H. H. Hewlett 

William Babcock O. D. Baldwin E. J. McOutohen 

Adam Grant W. S. Jones R. H.Pease 



The Bank of California, San Francisco 

Capital. $7.nm.ono. 
Surplus, li.noo.noo. 

Undivided Profits. July I. 1901. t.'/.il. 497.64. 

WILLIAM ALVORD Prcsldenll THOMAS ItltOWN Cashier 

i Utltl.l.H R. msllor Vloe-Prea'l I. F. MOUI.TON \..'i i 

M.I.EN M. CLAY Secretary I SA M II DANIELS ..Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS 
New York— Messrs. Laldlaw A Co.: tho Rank of New York. N. B. A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston — National Hhawtnut 
S?! 1 . •. , ( 1>leago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank: First National Bank. 
I lilladelphla-Phlladelphla National Bank. St. lunula— Boatmen's Hank. 
Mrginlatlty. Nov. — Agency of The Bank of California. London— Me — rs 
N. M. Rothschild A Sons. Paris— Messrs. do Rothschild Freres. Berlin— 
Direction der Dlsconto Gcsellschaft. China, Japan, and East Indies— Char- 
tered Bank of India. Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand— The 
Union Bank of Australia. Ltd.. and Bank of New Zealand. 
Letters of credit Issued, available In all parts of the world. 

Wells Fargo X. Co. Bank 

N. E. Cob. Sansome and Sutteb Sts. 
JOHN J. VALENTINE. President H. WADSWORTH, Cashier 

HOMER S. KING. Manager F. L. LIPMAN. A8»lBtant Cashier 

H. L. MILLER, Second Assistant Cashier. 

Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits Deo. 31, 1900 $8,620,223.88 

Branches— New York City, H. B. Parsons. Cashier: Salt Lake City, J. E. 
Dooly, Cashier; Portland, Or., R. Leu Bnrnes, Cashier. 
DIRECTORS— John J. Valentine. Andrew Christeson, Oliver Eldridge, 
Henry E. Huntington, Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook 
John Bermlngham, Dudley Evans. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capita) and Surplus 12,290,159,05 

Capital actually paid up in Cash 1,000.000 00 

Deposits June 29. 1901 .29,886,288.11 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President, B. A. Becker: First Vice-President 
Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstman; Cashier, A. H. R 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary. George Tourny 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller: General Attorney, W, S. Goodfellow. 

Ign. Stplnhart, E. Rohte H. B. Rusa, N Ohlandt, John Lloyd, and I. N 
Walter, 

.Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital 81,000,000. Paid Up Capital 8300,000 

.James D. Phelan, President S. G. Mubphy, Vice-PreBldent 

Geoege A. Stobt, Cashier John A. Hooper, Vice-President 

C. B. Hobson, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy. John A. Hooper. James 
Moffitt. Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Chas. S. Neal, James M. 
McDonald. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange on 
city banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

632 CALIFORNIA STREET, S. F. 

Deposits Jan 1, 1901... 827,881,798 Reserve Fund 8223.451 

Paid-up Capital 1,000,000 Contingent Fund 464.847 



E. B. POND, President 
LOVELL WHITE. CaBhier 



W. O. B. DeFREMERY, Vice-President 
R. M. WELCH. Assistant Cashier 



Directors— Henry F. Allen, Thomas Magee, W. C. B. de Fremery, C. O 
G. Miller, Robert Watt, George O. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin, Jacob 
Barth, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms and farming 
lands In the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made In checks payable 
In San Francisco, Post Office, or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 3 p. m„ and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only, 6;30 to 8 o'clock. 

Continental Building X Loan Association 

Established in 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 
Subscribed Capital. .812, 000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund... 8250.000 
Pald-ln-Capltal 2,000,000 Monthly Income, over 100,000 

Its Purpose is to help its members to build homes, alBo to make loans 
on Improved property, the members giving first Hens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help Its Stockholders to earn 8 to 12 per cent, per annum on their stock 
and allow them to open deposit accounts bearing Interest at the rate of 5 
per cent, per annum. 

Home Office— 222 Sansome St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Wm. Cobbin, General Manager 

Crocker- Woolvvorth National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Sts. 

Paid-up-Capital 81,000 000 

Wm. H. Crocker, President Geo. W. Kinra, Cashier 

O. E. Gbben, Vice-President W. Gbegg, Jb., Assistant Cashier 

Directors— W. H. Crocker, E. B Pond, George Crocker, O. E. Green. G.W. 
Kline. Henry J. Crocker. G. W. Scott. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 3, 1901. 




.:,':.-".- WZ$*3 a 



Insurance 







Our Home Company: The Pacific Mutual.— A recent visit 
to the offices of The Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Company 
of California in their Home Office Building, corner Sacra- 
mento and Montgomery streets, served to confirm our con- 
stant contention that The Pacific Mutual is one of the most 
progressive of American companies, and bound to be one of 
the great ones. Its growth is astonishing, even to those 
acquainted with the extent of its business, which covers 
forty-three States and territories. The four floors, devoted 
respectively to the Departments of Life Insurance, Accident 
Insurance and Industrial Insurance, and to the requirements 
of the executive officers, teem with activity. One hundred 
and twenty employees are hard at work. President Moore 
reported business as excellent, and the prospects of The 
Pacific Mutual the best in its history. The report of 
the Company's business for the first half of the present year 
shows gains in every department and a general healthy 
growth, all of which must be gratifying to the friends of this 
excellent Company whose thirty-two years of usefulness 
have made it one of the most eminent of our financial institu- 
tions. The Directors and officers of The Pacific Mutual are 
nmong California's best known business men, whose aim 
is to maintain a progressive Pacific Coast company, 
and to make it the peer of any for liberality in policy con- 
tracts and just and generous treatment of policy holders. 

* * * 

THE sensation of the week in underwriting circles is a 
change of management of a Casualty Company. The new 
manager has been the city agent of the same company for 
almost ten years, and the manager that was failing to "fill 
the bill" "passed himself out." 

* * * 

Mr. A. W. Shields, the Pacific Coast manager of the Equit- 
able Life, is now a member of the Tuna Club. He caught 
the tuna himself, and when he got it into the boat he found 
that it was insured in the Equitable. Hence no celebration. 

* * * 

Grain losses are, even at this late season, causing wonder- 
ment amongst the underwriters. 

* * * 

The Union Central Life Insurance Company of Ohio, Mr. 
C. W. Mills, general agent, paid last week in San Francisco 
;rlone. $18,000 in death claims. 

* * * 

The Brooklyn Life of Brooklyn, New York, has been rein- 
sured by the Equitable. The Brooklyn had a capital stock 
of $125,000 and assets of $1,632. By this arrangement it is 
safe to suppose that the directors got away with the "swag." 
The Brooklyn once did business in California, and only re- 
cently paid a $5,000 death claim in this city, 

* * * 

According to the report made by the Fire Commissioners 
to the city for the last fiscal year, the department responded 
to 1,139 alarms, 646 of which were from the boxes, 621 were 
first alarms, 21 second, and 4 third, and 493 were "silent." 
received by telephone or orally. The total length ot water 
mains laid during the year was 16,400 feet, new hydrants 
set, 122; reset, 73; removed, 8; replaced, 38; making the 
aggregate number in use 3.79S. The total losses by fire were 
$523,^,65.49; total amount of insurance on the property, 
$4,461,772.02; insurance paid, $419,573.43. The items of ex- 
pense for maintenance of the department are: Repairs, 
$49,312.40; forage, $30,152.17; fuel $10.727.S5; hose $12,327.50; 
new apparatus. $15,407.52; hydrants. $13,66S.93: supplies, 
$8,086.14; horse-shoeing, $5,575.87; horses, $5,795; harness 
and repairs, $6,096.38; department stables, $8,267.60, and 
salaries of over $518,000. 

* * * 

Mr. W. H. Foulkes. adjuster for the Fidelity and Casualty 
Co., accompanied by his wife, is taking a well-earned vaca- 
tion in Mendocino County. 



Mr. W. W. Alverson, who for the past eight years has 
been the special agent of the Atlas Insurance Company in 
the northwest territory, has been appointed to a like position 
under Mr. J. M. Beck, general manager, as special agent for 
the Fire Association and Philadelphia Underwriters for Cali- 
fornia. Both parties are to be congratulated. 

* * * 

Mr. L. L. Bromwell, the general agent of the Milwaukee 
Mechanics' Insurance Co., is in Milwaukee visiting the home 
office of his company. 

* * * 

President Dutton of the Fireman's Fund is able to be 
down at nis office after his recent illness, which was caused 
by his hard work on his Eastern trip. 

* * * 

Mr. Rolla V. Watt is recuperating at Klamath Springs. 

* * * 

Mr. W. P. Whelnn. the well-known special agent of the 
Firemans' Fund in Southern California and Oregon, is tak- 
ing his vacation in San Francisco, while Mr. George H. Men- 
dell, whj is among the senior special agents of the same 
company, has gone East for a change of climate. 



USE ALLEN'S F00TEASE. 



A powder to be shaken into the shoes. Your feet feel swollen, nervous 
and hot. and get tired easily. If you have smarting feet or light shoes, try 
Allen's Foot-Ease. It cools the feet and makes walking easy. Cures swol- 
len, sweating feet, ingrowing: nails, blla ers and callous m>o1s, Kelieves 
corns and bunions of all pain and cives rest and comfort- Try it tO- day, 
Sold by all druggists and shoe stores for 25c. Trial package FKEK, Ad- 
dress, Allen S- Olmsted, Le Roy, N. Y- 



PACinc Coast Department .-—»». 

G. H. WARD, 

Manager, 

337 PINE STREET. 
INSURANCE COMPANY Sar. Francisco. Ca 

OB* FREEPORT J'llOllO. M'llll 5509. 




New Amsterdam Casualty Company 

of New York 

405 Montgomery St., San Francisco. Cal. 
Edmund F. Green, Manaeer. Jesse W. Lilienthal, Attorney. 

Employers' Liability. Accident. Burglary and Salary Insurance. 

Fire Association, of Philadelohia 
Philadelphia Underwriters, of Philadelphia 

PENN 
J. M. BECK, Manacer 
219 Sansoiuc -street. Sun FranciBCo, Cal. 

FELIX'S ROTISSERIE, 

Felix Gouailnardou, proprietor, (formerly with 

Jack's Kotisserie), 537 California street, below 

Kearny. Private rooms for families and banquets 

Telephone Black 2906 

THE CHAMPAGNES OF 

Moeta 
Cbandon. 

White Seal and Brut Imperial 

now being marketed are of the celebrated vintage of 1893. 

Messieurs. Moet & Chandonare the most extensive vineyard pro- 
prietors in the world and their Champagnes are having a larger sale 
and are of a quality far superior to any other brand, being used al- 
most exclusively at all ultra-fashionab'le functions, among others at 
the Admiral Dewey Collation, Vanderbilt, Astor, Bradley-Martin, 
Belmont, and Stuyvesant Fish affairs— New York Wine Circular. 




WILLIAM WOLFF & CO., 



Pacific Coast Agents. 



Market Stre«t. S. F. 



August 3, 1901. 



*AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



IS 



The "News Letter's" 

5>vjr\da.y Supplement 



INSURANCE. 



For half a century the N I baa done its h 

supply its hosts of admlrll 

up iii date, or abead ol time II 
Hut the oilitors of the News Letter h:i\. Buddenly awat 
to the tact that this paper has never had a Sunday 
meat How they could haw overlooked bo Important a 
maltt-r for so long, the editors themselves 'annul im 
but deeming thai it is better late than never they are Intend- 
ing to produce positively the largest, the gaudiest, the 
QOlslesI Sunday supplement ever printed. This triumph 
of twentieth century journalism has not gone to press yet — 
in fait, it Is such a stupendous undertaking thai it will prob- 
ably he some years before it is in proper shape to jai 
public. But in order to show that we mean what we say. 
we print below a few of the lar sensations on 

Which our galaxy of genius is now working in relays. 

* « * 

Is love caused by a microbe? Read what Dr. C. C. O'Con- 
nell says about it, after years of successful practice in San 
Francisco. This sensational page is re-enforced by opinions 
from General De Wet, Lord Roberts, Mrs. Carrie Nation, 
William Jennings Bryan, James J. Corbett, and hundreds of 
others who know absolutely nothing about the subject. 

* • • 

The ten-year-old boy who killed his grandmother and then 
laughed at her will write an article telling how he com- 
mitted the horrible deed. It will be fully illustrated in a 
human-interest way, and will have a photograph of the pool- 
old ladys grave. Here is a thrill that in itself is worth the 
price of the paper. 

-■ ■:■ ■:: 

Color, color, slobs, blobs, gobs and daubs of screech- 
ing color, red-hot from our new press that turns out a mil- 
lion a minute. An eye-shade given with every copy. 

* * * 

A society girl, whose name, when disclosed, will cause a 
panic, will tell in a thrilling, vivid style how she rode three 
blocks on a street car, and will describe the impressions 
made upon her by the unwashed multitude. A picture of the 
conductor accompanies this article. He tells of his own 
sensations. 

* t * 

The daily life of a great actress, written by a man who hid 
under her bed and rubbered. The greatest achievement 
of modern journalism. Souvenirs of the occasion are dis- 
played in our window, settling beyond dispute questions that 
have interested the public for a long time. A facsimile of 
her laundry bill will be published. 

* * * 

Admiral Cervera, under the head of "How I Was Licked," 
tells our readers in advance the testimony he will give be- 
fore the Schley Commission. Our specially hired hypnotist 
extracted this information from the Admiral without his 
knowledge, and if his testimony is different when he is put 
on the stand, you will at least know, from reading our sup- 
plement, what it should have been. Our janitor follows it 
with an article telling why he is a gentleman and Admiral 
Sampson isn't, with pictures of the janitor's birthplace to 
prove that his parents were poor. 

* * * 

'Red socks cause insanity. Did you know that? Our freak- 
iest contributor. Baby Gazook, will tell all about it in this 
kaleidoscopic supplement. Our contributor has been experi- 
menting with colored hosiery for years, which accounts for 
the authenticity of this remarkable article. 

* * * 

New song, words and music, "If You Ain't Ma Baby Why 
Ain't You Ma Baby?" given with this unparalled supplement. 
Positively the vulgarest and raggiest coon song ever pub- 
lished. Get it before the postal authorities suppress it. 

* * * 

How would you like to know — well, you will know if you 
read our great supplement. The most wonderful thing in the 
world. Disclosures that will shake society to its foundation, 
and — but we dare not tell you any more. Read it! Read it!! 
Read it!!! 



FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE 

FIREMANS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF 8AN FRANCISCO, OAL. 

Capital $1,000,000 Assets, $4,000,000 

PALATINE 

INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) OF LONDON ENGLAND 

0. F- MCLLINS, Manager. 416-418 California street. 8. F. 
FIRE INSURANCE 



Founded A. D. 1792 

Insurance Oompany of / lorth A 



merica 



OF PHILADELPHIA. PESN. 

Paid-up Capital t3.0O0.0O0 

Surplus to Policy Holders 15,022.016 

JAMES D. BAILEY. General Agent. 412 CalHomia street. S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720 
Capital Paid Up. S3.446.100 Assets. te4,662. 043.35 

Surplus to Policy Holders. 8s, '.r,o.. 131.41 . Losses Paid Over, {184,000,000.00 

PACIFIC COAST BRANCH: 

501 Montgomery street. 
FRANK W. DICKSON, Manager 

HERMANN NATHAN & PAUL F. KINGSTON, Local Managers. 
FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New Zealand Insurance Company 

op New Zealand 
Capital. $5,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office In company's building, 312 California street 

W. P. THOMAS. Manager 
Hooker & Lent, City Agents, 14 Post street 

Phoenix Assurance Go., of London 

Established 1782 

Providence-Washington Insurance Company 

Incorporated 1799 
BUTLER A HEWITT. General Agents 413 California street, S. F. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Co. 

OF HARTFORD 

Cash Capital $1,000,000.00 

Cash Assets 4.081,895.13 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,092,661.01 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager 
COLIN M. BOYD, San Francisco agent, 411 California street. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Go. 

(Limited) OF LIVERPOOL 

Capital (6,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents 316 California street, S. F. 

The Thuringia Insurance Company 

of ERFURT, GERMANY 
Capital. 92,250,000 Assets, (10,984,248 

YOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Manage 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome street. S. F. 



North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg:, Germany 

N. Schlessinger, City Agent. 304 Montgomery 8t., S. F. 



ANDERSON SPRINGS. 

Only natural Mineral Steam Baths In 

LAKE COUNTY. 
Hot Sulphur and Iron Baths. 
Board: $10 to $14 per week. 
Baths free. Address, 

J. ANDERSON, Anderson Springs, Mlddletown, 
Lake County, California. 

Fare, San Francisco to Springs and return reduced 
to $8. Send for circular. 
Full particulars at S. F. News Letter, 5</ 2 Kearny St., S. F. 

HOBERG'S RESORT. 

Pleasantly located in a pine forest three thousand 
five hundred feet altitude; highest elevation, low- 
est price. First-class family table and pleasant 

rooms, eight dollars per week. 
Surrounding scenery unsurpassed by any springs 
in the immediate vicinity. Stage daily. Buy tickets 
direct for Hoberg's, Lake County, California. 

George Kammerer and Mrs. M. Hoberg, Proprietors. 

Full particulars at S. F. News Letter office. 

HOTEL BENVENUE AND COTTAGES. 

LAKEPORT, CAL. 

LAKEPORT'S SUMMER RESORT. Situated overlooking 
the shore on Clear Lake. New pavilion, boathouse, and bowl- 
ing alley. Open all the year. Special facilities for accommo- 
dating families with children; home cooking; boating, bath- 
ing, hunting, and superior fishing. Lovely drives and walks. 
Rates: $7 per week. 

FRANK & A. M. SCALES, Proprietors. 



HOLLY OAKS 

SAUSALITO, CAL. 

Rates from $10 
per week upward. 

MRS. M. A. FARRAR, 

Proprietor. 



PARK HOUSE Ben Lomond, Cal. 

Pleasant surroundings, beautiful scenery, good table, fish- 
ing, and fine drives. MRS. I. N. HAYES. 



Blue 




CYPRESS VILLA. 



B STREET, San Rafael, near Narrow Gauge. 
NOW OPEN. This favorite resort has been newly 
furnished and has undergone an entire renovation. 
For families, tourists, and the public generally, the 
accommodations are unexcelled. Board by day 
week or month. New management. 

MRS. WARBURTON, Proprietor. 



DUNCAN SPRINGS. 

HOPLAND, CAL. 

Lovely drive of two miles from station to hotel. 
Terms: $10 to $12. Best medicinal waters in the 
State. Housekeeping cottages to rent. 
O. HOWELL, Hopland, Cal. 



PARAISO HOT SPRINGS. 

The Carlsbad of America 

Open Winter and Summer 

Monterey County, Cal. C. T. Romle, Proprietor 

F. W. Schroeder, Manager. 



THE SWITZERLAND OF AMERICA. 
Boating (new boats), bathing, fishing and 
hunting. Dancing and music every even- 
ing except Sundays. Best dance hall in 
Lake County. Fine table; only white 
cooks employed. Send for new pamphlet 

O. WEISMAN, Midlake P. O., Lake County, Cal. 



Lakes 



SKAGGS' HOT SPRINGS. 



Sonoma County, only 4% hours from San Francisco; but 9 miles 
staging; waters noted for medicinal virtues; best natural bath la 
State; grood trout streams; telephone, telegraph, daily mail and ex- 
press; urst-class hotel and stage service; mornlne and afternoon 
states. Round trip from San Francisco, only 85.50. Take Tiburon 
ferry at 7.30 a. m, or 3.3 ■ p. m. Terms, 82 per day or 812 per week, 
References: Any truest of the past six years. For further informa- 
tion address 

J. F. MULGREW, Proprietor. 

SKAGGS. GAL. 



HOWARD SPRINGS. 



picturesquely situated amidst the pine forests of Lake County— the 
Switzerland of America. Elevation 2300 feet; no foe; climate perfect. 
Natural hot mineral plunge and tub baths, line medicinal drinking* 
water, Excellent fishing and hunting 1 . Telephone on premises. 
Rates, 810 and 812, with special terms for families. Ac- 
comodations, table and service first-class. Round trip from San 
Francisco, via Napa, Caiistogra. 810, including' fine stage drive. 
For accommodations and further particulars address 

MRS. R. J. BEEBY, Proprietor. 

HOTEL MOUNT VIEW. 

CHANGED HANDS. Will hereafter be open the year 
round. Bus meets 9.30 and 11 o'clock trains from city at 
present. The culinary department will receive special 
attention. For rates and particulars address, 

Hotel Mount View, Ross Valley, Marin County, Cal. 

PACIFIC CONGRESS SPRINGS. 

An ideal spot in the Santa Cruz Mountains. Two hours 
from San Francisco. Five miles from Los Gatos. No 
tin some staging*. Delightful climate. Mineral water 
and table unsurpassed. Boating 1 , swimming and fishing 
and all out-door sports. One of the best tennis courts 
on the Coast. Entire new management. 

A. 8. OLNEY, Manager. 

THE GARDEN CITY SANITARIUM. 

Thoroughly Equipped with all modern appliances. X-ray. All 
forms water treatment, the finest Statio Galvanic Sinusoidal and Faradlc 
Electrical apparatus. A Corps of well-trained nurses of both sexes 
skilled in all forms of treatments and manipulations Rest Cure scientlflo- 
eally carried out. * • • * A quiet home-like place, beautiful scenery 
Mount Hamilton and the famous Lick Observatory In plain view; one 
block from eleotrio oars, fifteen minutes walk from the center of the city 
Terms 310 to 820 per week, Including: medical attention and regular treat 
ment. 

Garden City Sanitarium, East San Jose, Cal. 



GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL. 

Felton, Santa Cruz County, Cal. 
A. J. GASS, Proprietor. 



Six miles from Santa Cruz, 
and % mile from big* trees. 
Bub meets all trains. Terms 

reasonable. 



HOTEL KNICKERBOCKER 



BLITHEDALE 

Mill Valley, Cal. 



VAN NESS AVENUE, 

San Francisco. 



J. A. ROBINSON. 



CALISTOGA & CLEAR LAKE STAGE LINE 

Direct to Harbin, Anderson, Adams, Howard, Astorg-, 
Glenbrook, Hoburfs and Selglers Spring's. Teams and lad- 
die horses, etc. Write 



WM. SPIERS. Calistoga. 



August a, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



21 



OBSERVATIONS 

By the Street-Corner Philosopher. 



The Five O'clock Parade. 

If you've known San Francisco long 

And seen our life and sport, 
You know that this procession's not 

The patriotic sort; 
Before this show of plumes and gauds 

Tis Folly, I'm afraid, 
Who swings the gay baton that leads 

The Five O'Clock Parade. 

Perhaps we're slow at midnight and 

Perhaps we're slow at noon — 
We're not so naughty as we look, 

Stay with us late and soon, — 
But if you'd see the city at 

Her best and worst displayed, 
Review with me the splendors of 

The Five O'clock Parade. 

The Lizzie boy, the Willie boy, 

The masher plain and rough, 
The "rounder" and the "liner" and 

The South o' Market tough. 
The candy-girl, the shop-girl and 

The Butterflies' Brigade — 
They all are old familiars in 

The Five O'Clock Parade. 

But see! What are those spectral forms 

That look nor left nor right, 
But hurry from these sounds of joy 

Like beetles from the light? 
Those ghosts, my friend, are Oaklanders; 

Their sad demeanor note, 
As grimly toward the pier they rush 

To catch the Oakland boat. 

Behold yon elevator-boy; 

A look of pride is his. 
Like many more he is not swell, 

Though he believes he is. 
Break not the current of his dream — 

In pity let him rest 
In worship of his purple hose 

And orange-colored vest. 

See yonder bunch of screaming hues, 

That cake-walk fairy fly, 
Bright as a rocket trailing sparks 

Across a midnight sky; 
For five long years I've seen her as 

Her daily course she's made 
Among the gaudy blossoms of 

The Five O'clock Parade. 

And thus the pageant passes by 

With all its vanity. 
Like Puck, I scratch my chin and say, 

"What fools these mortals be!" 
For, like this stretch of Market street, 

This life, I am afraid, 
Has much the show and folly of 

The Five O'Clock Parade. 



ksWHI^ER^TO^RTyik^^^ 



It is always a pleasure to go to Zinkand's. The sur- 
roundings are attractive, the food and wines are the best, 
and the service is unsurpassed. It is a favorite meeting place 
for society people after the theatre. 

CALIFORNIA HOT SPRINGS 

Hot springs, butnota sanitarium Formerly AgnaCaliente Springs, Sonoma 
Valley. No staging; 46 miles via C. N. Railway or S. P. R. R. Immense 
swimming tank. Splendid table. Come Sundays —try it. Round trip, 
?1.10. Telephone. Expensive improvements. $12 and ?14. 

COOPER & SHEDDEN, Agua Caliente, Cal. 



NOTE THE SPECIAL LOW RATES FOR BALANCE 
OF SEASON AT THE RENOWNED ..* J* J* J* 

Highland Springs 

Easy of access. Only three hours' staging. Numerous mineral springs 
ol exeat virtue- Finest hotel accommodations north of San Frnncl*e<» Mot 
and cold mineral baths. Competent masseurs. Bowline alley, tennis courts. 
swimming tanks, croquet, shufileboard. Fine roads and trails- Kiding 
and', driving: horses. Best deer hunting In Lake County. Competent 
guides- Good hunting animals. The fall and winter rates will l>e in force 
August 1st, instead of September 1st, as formerly. Room in small hotel. 
$10 per week- Rooms in cottages, 812 per week, for one In room: 320 for 
two in room- Rooms in main hotel, $12 and 814 for one person; $20 and 
$24 (or two in room. Call on L. D. Craig, 316 Montgomery street: The 
Traveler office, 20 Montgomery street; or Mrs. Kate J. Willets. room 64, 
Flood building, San Francisco, or write direct to CRAIG & WARNER. 
Highland Springs, Cal. 



HARBIN SPRINGS 



The Most Accessible and Most Desirable In Lake County. 
Contain Sulphur, Iron, Magnesia, and Arsenic. 

Open the Year Round. Hotel, Cottages and Grounds Lighted 
with Acetylene Oas. "Wonderful cures of rheumatism, gout, 
dyspepsia, catarrh, paralysis, neuralgia, dropsy, blood poison- 
ing, skin diseases, kidney, liver and stomach troubles. A Nat- 
ural Mineral or Medicated Mud Rath has just been discovered; 
nothing like it known. Don't Miss Harbin Springs During May 
and June. The most delightful months in the year. Absolutely 
free from mosquitoes. Perfect climate: no excessive heat; fin- 
est vegetable garden in the State. Perfectly equipped livery 
stable in connection with hotel. Home dairy. Popular amuse- 
ments. Two hard-finished cottages just completed. ONLY SIX 
HOURS from San Francisco. Stage daily from Calistoga to 
Springs. Round-trip tickets at S. P. office, $8- Fine hunting and 
fishing. Rates reasonable. Long distance telephone. 

J. A. HAYS, Proprietor. 



Arlington Hotel 



SANTA BARBARA 



The finest summer climate in the State. Sea bathing 
every day in the year. The best green turf golf links 
in California; five minutes' street oar ride from the 
hotel. Special low rates during the summer. 

E. P. DUNN, Proprietor. 



Arcadia 

CAMPUS STATION 

Santa Cruz Mountains 

Delightfully located, 
half a mile from 
Big Trees. New 
hotel newly fur- 
nished. Electric 
lighted. Hot and 
cold water. Porce- 
lain tubs. 

BATHING, FISHING, HUNTING, TENNIS, Etc. 

Address THOMAS L. BELL, Felton P. O. 

HOTEL ROWARDENNAN 

Located in the Santa Cruz Mountains. 

9 miles from Santa Cruz. Round-Trip tickets 

from San Francisco, $3.00. 

Everything first-class. Over Ten Thousand 

Dollars spent in improvements this year. 

Headquarters for parties going into the Big 

Basin. Good livery. Competent drivers. 

Write for booklet to B. DICKINSON, Lessee, 

Ben Lomond, Cal. 




22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 3, 1901. 



ROSE JAR. 



AFTER-WORD. 

(Grnce Goodale in Scribner't*,) 
You did know I loved you. 

That last night. 
Why did you not kiss me? 

Ah, you might! 

Just one kiss to last me 

All my life, 
Just one kiss to help me 

Still the strife. 

I could not mistake you, 

You had showed, 
Clear and straight before me, 

The long road. 

I must travel lonely, 

Without you. 
Should I blame you? What else 

Could you do? 

But your task was finished; 

I could see 
Nowhere in your nature 

Need of me. 

All my foolish day-dreams 

Were quite gone. 
Only I. who dreamed them, 

Must live on; 

Live, with hopeless future, 

Empty past. 
Then why not have kissed me 

At the last? 



THE COMING DARK. 
(Albert Bicelow Paine in Century Magazine t 

Dull, barren lands without, and trail- 
ing rain 

That curtains round the world, where 
winter gloom 

Lies deep upon the fields. A voice- 
less room. 

And one within who watches life grow 
dim 

Till day shuts down, and only leaves, 
for him, 
A night-reflected face against the pane. 



pTjJjg 


mm 


I iulLv 


The only sus- 


GIVES 


COMFORT 


penderthat gives 
absolute com- 




J3. fort under all 


| 


jA conditions. 


r 


\ \ No strain on 
i \ wearer's 


m\\ ^w A 


■1. l^^^B^^Vm 


\ shouldeis 


t • / 


' or on the 


v "*« •' 


] uuitons. 


. 


J yiu.de on 


wp , .'%*^ 


/ lli«- only 

y principle 

■< tliiit gives 


lm 


^ freedom of 


motion. Ever y 




p;iir guaranteed. 




.Trimmings will 


■ / n\ i 


not rust. Look 




for Pre Hjdcnt on 


m.mmam^'m 


the buckles of the 


M 


pen u 1 n e . Price 


wf 


50 c e o ts. sold 


^g 


everywhere or by 




mail. 




C. A. EIMSARTON 




MFG. CO.. 




Box 241, 8hlrl*j, Hui, 



Pabst beer 

isakrcspnre 



FRUITION. 
(Martha Wolcott Hitchcock in Harper's.) 

"To have my heart's desire, O Lord, 
To do the deed my brain has planned. 
Nor pass till 1 have plucked the fruit, 

And offered thee with brimming hand; 

O Lord, to see the hope fulfilled. 
And bear, as once my mother bore; 

This is to throb with those who live 
And are alive for evermore." 



Nay. but the cost. Give all thy heart. 

Thy youth, thy power, and count it 
loss. 
Thy whole is not enough to win 

That crown upon the Victor's cross. 
E'en Earth, to bear her tiniest seed. 

Will have the perfect flower to die, 
And nourishes with martyr blood 

Her broods in field and sea and sky. 

"Let me. too. die. But let my life 

Glow in the deed I died to free, 
If bearing cost the mortal pang, 

ret let this hope survive in me: 
The book, the work, the cause, the 
name. 

Are vital, for I willed it so. 
And with a glad heart gave to them 

My heritage of life below." 

Still dark the truth to thee. But learn 

The Master's word, with meaning old, 
And lose thy life that thou mayst find 

And take again, with joy untold. 
For. lo, the living soul of thee 

In thy thought is multiplied, 
To live forever with the stars, 

Though thy base self be crucified. 



IN THE FIELDS. 

When on the bills the golden sunlight 
lies 
And apple trees are heavy with the ■ 

snow 
Of drifted bloom that shades the 
grass below. 
While far above are realms of cloudless 

skies, 

When overhead the wandering swallow 

flies 

And butterflies in loops of color go — 

Then, as we wait together, do I know 

Some touch, some hint, some gleam of 

Paradise. 
The sweet song-sparrow from the 
poplar sings. 
The swaying leaves put forth their 
emerald shields. 
Each trembling blossom where the 
barred bee clings 
Its store of sweets through drowsy 
hours yields; 
What sense of life, what joy that almost 
stings. 
With you and I. there, loitering in 
the fields. 



BETRAYAL. 

(I.. M. f'juillcy. in Flarper'a Monthly.) 

One day Love came to her; no virgin 

aame 
Blazoned her cheek: for pride and 

maiden shame 
Held o'er her heart's Sear secret fast 

control, 
And shuttered all the windows of her 

soul. 
And no one guessed her happy hidden 

weakness. 
Though lowered eyelids and pure front 

of meekness. 
But once she sang, when Joy arose and 

wove 
Into the strain a tell-tale Song of Love. 
And all the little world around her 

smiled, 
But memories of their own fair youth 

beguiled. 
For in her happiness, as in a glass. 
Tiny saw their own loves delicately 

pass. 
One day Love went, and none her 

anguish guessed; 
For still she laughed and jested with 

lie- rest. 
Her fair protm forehead faced the world 

about. 
And every prying peeper put to rout. 
Until she sang. Then Sorrow burst his 

bounds. 
And passion's chord broke off in jarred 

sounds. 
All turned and gazed, drawn by a 

piteous crying. 
And saw a broken heart, in her bared 

bosom, dying. 



CONVICTED. 
(Edwin L. 9ab1n, in Chantanquan). 

"There is no God!" he. mocking, said. 

■Behold, 
Honor have I, and happiness, and gold. 
Abundantly from day to day 1 live. 
What more. I ask you. has your God to 

give!" 
And so he went his way — until that 

night 
Which conies al last, when all our 

fancied might 
From out our Clutch like running water 

slips. 
"Oh God!" he prayed) between his 

bloodless lips. 

J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO. 

Shlpiilncr niul Commlnnlon Merchant 

fleiieral ncenis 
Oceanic Steamship Company 

OUItwrhADi Cement. 

327 Jlarket street, cor. Fremont, S. F 



August 3, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 



SUNBEAMS 



- 



The Sheriff of . h bul 

rather mean, consulted a cl 

who had made diseases "f the 
eye his special Btudj ig his 

slKht. 

After a careful examination the doi tor 
■aid a cataract was tormina;, and there 
would have to be an operation. 

"Expensive?" asked the sheriff. 

"Twenty guineas!" was the answer. 
'Must think it over.'' said the sheriff. 

Throe months after the sheriff went 
by appointment to be operated on by 
n celebrated London specialist (one 
hundred and twenty-four miles away. i 
Now it sn happened that the specialist 
was ill. and had to telegraph for a sub- 
stitute. 

Judge of the sheriff's surprise when. 
loor of the operating-room being 
opened, found himself faee to face with 
his own local doctor! 

It was too late to retreat, however; 
and the operation was performed. 

"Your fee?" asked the sheriff. 

"Forty guineas!" was the quiet an- 
swer. 

"I can't see." said the visitor, "why 
you have your genealogical chart hung 
so high. Such things are extremely 
interesting, but no one can examine it 
where it is." Here Mr. Porcine took 
him gently by the arm and led him into 
the library, where they could be alone. 
"Mrs. Porcine," he explained, "was 
bound to have one of them things; and 
as we didn't have one quite handy, I 
just framed my prize greyhound's pedi- 
gree and hung it high." 

"And did you find the Chinese a brave 
nation?" we asked of the returned sol- 
dier. "Indeed," he replied, casting a 
sidelong glance at the wagonfnl of loot 
which was being unloaded, "they were 
foemen worthy of our steal." 

Lady — (to departing servant) — What 
shall I say in your reference? Servant 
— Just that I stood it for six months 
with you, mum — that'll do for me. 

Indignant Patron — You advertise to 
cure consumption, don't you? Dr. 
Quack — Yes, sir. I never fail when my 
instructions are followed. Indignant 
Patron — My son took your medicine for 
a year and then died. Dr. Quack — My 
instructions were not followed. I told 
him to take it for two years. 

Mr. Housekeep — My wife broke a fairy 
lamp, two vases and a cut-glass flower 
stand in the drawing-room la.^t night, 
but she accomplished her purpose. Mr. 
Ascum — For goodness sake, what was 
her purpose? Mr. Housekeep — To cap- 
ture a clothes moth she saw flying 
around. 

"What are the wild waves saying?" 
murmured the woman, as she stood on 
the silver lining of the mighty main. 
"Nothing, Maria," replied the man, 
hoarsely; "they are like some people 
we know — they make a great deal of 
noise, but don't say anything." 

Young Lady — Oh, you wicked boy! 
robbing the poor bird of its young ones. 
Do you never consider how sad you 
make their mother? "Oh," replied the 
boy, "their mither disna care, for that's 
her you've got in yer hat." 

Madge — Did you ever love a man you 
wouldn't marry? Dolly — Certainly! 
Sometimes it takes a long time before 
you find out he hasn't any money. 



fviHim R '*s 



SAUCE 



THE ORIGINAL AND GENUINE WORCESTERSHIRE. 

All dishes, such as soups, fish, meats, 
gravy, game, salads etc. are doubly 
appetising and digestible when fla- 
vored with — Lea & Perrins' sauce. 



BEWARE OF IMITATIONS 



On Every Bortle. 



c&a- <%cyJ!<r 



. JohnDuncarviSons 
'-&r r-i*n47 Ager\t3-N«wlWK.. 



Rube — Yaas. Si is dead: went inter 
town ter get a tooth pulled; dentist 
feller told him he'd better take gas fust 

an' . Josh — Dentist gen him too 

much, eh? "Oh. no; after the dentist 
feller told him that, he went hack to 
his hotel an' took the gas hisself." 

"What is the marriage rate in these 
parts?" asked the stranger who was 
gathering statistics. "The marriage 
rate," responded the native, proudly, 
"is two dollars for the license an' a 
kiss from the bride. The sheriff gets 
both, an' I'm the sheriff." 



The Angle Worm — Did you bear about 
the thousand-legged worm mil 
assignment to-day? The Snail I 
lOUS, no! What caused his downfall? 
The Angle Worm — His wife bought two 
complete changes of hosiery on credit, 
yi sterday. 

He was obviously anxious, and she 
foamed almost willing. "I shall refer 
you to Papa." she said, with a becom- 
ing blush, "before giving you a final 
answer." "But I am perfectly willing 
to take you without any reference," said 
he, magnanimously. 



Overland Monthly 
August Contents : 

Frontispiece. — Portrait of Miss P 

Pnotograph by Dr. Arnold Genthe. 

Rebellion in Photography Dr. Arnold Genthe 

Illustrated by the Author. 

When the Snows Drift John G. Neirhardt 

An Indian Story. 

The Iron-Shod Woman Mrs. M. L. Terry 

Illustrated by Horen Patigian. 

For Gold. — Poem Walter Shea 

Illustrated by W. H. Bull. 

The Canadian Boatmen Pearllita C. Stadelmen 

Labor Organizations Charles A. Murdock 

Maneuvers of the California Guard.. James F. J. Archibald 
Illustrated by the author and by portraits. 

Liolah Clyde Scott Chase 

A Story of the Northwest. 

Johnson's Regeneration Robert V. Carr 

A Soldier Sketch. 

The Hike Robert V. Carr 

A Poem. 

Rooms to Let Mary C. Ringnalt 

Illustrated by Henry Raleigh. 

Current Books Grace Luce Irwin 

Review. 

Joseph Le Conte Wallace Irwin 

Sonnet. 

About Santa Barbara County C. M. Gidney 

Illustrated. 
From San Francisco to Monterey 

Illustrated. 

Price 10 Cents $1 per Year 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 3, 1901. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC C0.--PACIFIC SYSTEM. 



Trains leave and are due lo arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 
[Main Line. Foot of Market St.] 



lkavk] 



Fbom Joxy 14. 1901 



[ARRIVE 



7:00 a Benlcia. 9uisun, Elmlra. and Sacramento 6:25 P 

7:00 a Vacaville, Winters, Rumsey...'. ":55 P 

7:30 a Martinez, San Ramon. Vallejo. Napa. Callstoga, Sania Rosa... 6:25 P 

8:00 A Davis, Woodland, Knights Landing, Marysvllle, OrovIUe 7:55 P 

8:00 A Atlantic Express. Ogden and East 12:25 p 

8:00 a. Niles. Lathrop, StoeKton 7:2£ p 

8:00 a Nlles. Mendota. Hanlord. Visalla. Porterville- 4:55 p 

8-30 a Shasta Express - DaviB. Williams, (for Bartlett Sprinfirs). Wil- 
lows. Red Bluff. Portland 7:5S P 

8:30 a San Jose. Llvermore. Stockton, lone. Sacramento. Placervtlle. 

Marysvllle. Chlco. Red Bluff. 4:25 p 

8 :30 a Oakdale, Chinese (Yosemite). Sonora. Carters - 4 :25 P 

9 00 A Haywards, Nlles. and way stations „ II :55 A 

9:00 A Vallejo 12:25 P 

9:00 a Los Angeles Expre's— Martinez. Tracy. Lathrop, Stockton, 

Merced. Fresno, and Los Angeles 7:25 p 

9:30 a Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations 7:55 P 

10:00 a The Overland Limited— Ogden. Denver, Omaha. Chicago 6:55 p 

tl:00p Sacramento River 9teamera t5:00 a 

3:30 p Hay wards. Nlles, and way stations 7:55 p 

4:00 p Benlcia. Winters, Sacramento, Woodland, Knights Landing:, 

Mary-trine. Oroville l n :55 A 

4:00 p Martinez. San Ramon. Vallejo, Napa, Calistoga, Santa Rosa 925 A 

4:00 p Nlles. Llvermore, Stockton, Lodi 12;25 p 

4:30f Hay wards, Nlles. San Jose. Llvermore t«:55 a 

430p Port Costa, Tracy, Lathrop, Stockton 10:25 a 

5:00 P The Owl Limited — Fresno. Tulare, Bakersfleld, Saugus for 

Santa Barbara, Los Aneeles 8:55 A 

5:00 p Martinez. Antloeh, Stockton, Merced. Fresno 12:2> p 

5:00 p Yosemite 12 25 p 

5:30 p New Orleans Express — Mendota, Fresno, Bakersneld, Los 

Aneeles. Demlng, El Paso. New OrleanB, and East 7:55 A 

6:00 P Hay wards. Nlles. and San Jose 7:55 A 

T6 OOP Vallejo 11:25 A 

6:00 p Oriental Mail— Oeden. Cheyenne. Omaha. Chicago 12:25 p 

6:00 P Oriental Mail— Oeden, Denver, St. Louis. Chicaeo 4:25 P 

7:00 P Oregon and California Express— Sacramento, Marysrille, Red- 
ding. Portland. Puget Sound, and East 8*5 A 

8:05 p San Pablo, Port Costa, Martinez, and way stations 1155 a 

t8:05 p Vallejo - 7*5 p 

Coast Division (Narrow Gauee). (Footof Market St.) 

t7;45A Santa Cruz Excursion to Santa Cruz and principal way sta- 
tions t^:05 P 

8:15 A Newark, Centerville. San Jose. Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz, and way stations.. 5:50 p 

t2:15p Newark, Centerville. San Jose. New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations 10:50 A 

4:15 P Newark, San Jose. Los Qatos t8:50 a 

c4:15p Glenwood. Boulder Creek. Santa Cruz £8:50 a 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY 

From San Fhancisco — Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— f7:l5, 9:00. and 11:00 
A. m. 1:00. 3:00. 5 : 15, p, H. 

From O ak i anp — Footof Broadway.— t6:00.l8:00.t8:05, 10;00a.m. 12:00, 

2:00, 4:00 p.m. 

Coabt Division (Broad Gauge). (Third and Townsend streets.) 

6:10 a San Jose and way stations 6:30 a 

t7:00 a San Jose and way stations 1 :30 P 

/7:00a New Almaden _ /1:10p 

17:30 a Sunday Excursion for San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, 

and principal way statlous 18:30 P 

9:00 a San Jose, Hollister. Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, Salinas. San 

Luis Oblspo.Santa Barbara.and principal Intermediate stations 7 :30 P 

10:30 a San Jose and way stations 6:30 p 

11=30 a San Jose and war stations 5:30 P 

t2:45 p San Mateo. Redwood. Menlo Park, Palo Alto, Santa Clara. San 
Jose, Hollister. Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, and Pacific 

Grove tl0:45 A 

8:30 P San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove and way 

stations 4 :10 p 

t4:15 p San Jose and principal way stations 9:45 a 

t5:00 p San Jose, Los Gstos. and principal way stations t9:00 a 

5:30 p San Jose and piincipal way stations 8:36 a 

6:00 P Redwood, San Jose, Gilroy. Salinas, Santa Barbara, Los An- 
geles 10^5 a 

6:30 P San Jose and way stations 1 8:00 a 

ail:45 P San Jose and way stations _ 7:30p 



a forMornine. 
i Sundays only, 

£ Monday. 



p for Afternoon. t Sundays excepted- 

f Tuesdays and Fridays. a Saturdays only, 
c Saturday and Sunday. 



The Pacific Transfer Company -will call for and check baeeaee from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Aeents for Time Cards and other 
information. 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO, 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p.m., fo r 

YOKOHAMA AND HONG KONG. 

calling at Kobe (Biogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hongkong 
with steamers for India, etc. No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Tuesday. August 27. 1901 

Dohic (via Honolulu) Friday. September 20. 1901 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Tuesday, October 15.1901 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Thursday, November 7. 1901 

Boond Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 
For freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street 
corner First. D. D. STUBBS, General Manager. 



Murphy, Grant & Co., 

Agents for the 

BALTIMORE 

MT. VERN0N-W00DBERRY COTTON DUCK CO. 



Importers of Staple and Fancy Dry Goods. Manufacturers of furnishing 
goods. Patentees and sole manufacturers of The " Never-Rlp " Overall. 
The best in the world. 



Samuel N. Shortridge, Atty-at-Law 

Crocker Building, San Francisco. 

CALIFORNIA NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY CO. 

LESSEE 

SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC R'Y CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tibcbos Feeey — Foot of Market Street 

WEEK DAYS-7:30. 9:00. 11:00 A.M.: 12:35. 3:30. 5:10. 6:30 p.m. Thursdays- 
Extra Trip at 11:30 p.m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:50 and 11:30 P.M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00 9:30. 11:00 a.m.: 1:30, 330, 5:00. 6:20 p.m. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO 

WEEK DAYS— 6:10,7:50.9:20. 11:10 a.m.: 12:45.3:40. 5:10 P.M. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1:55 and 6:35 p.m. 
SUNDAYS-8:10. 9:40 11:10 a.m.. 1:40. 3:40. 5:05. 625 p.m. 

Between San Francisco and SiuueUen Park, same schedule as above. 



Leave San Franc!sco 


In Effect Nov. 7. 1900 1 Arrive at Sun Francisco 


Week days 1 Sundays 
7:30 AM | H:O0 am 
330 PM 9:30 am 
5:10 pm 1 5:00 ra 


Destinations 1 Sundays I Week days 

Novato I 10:40 am 8:4Uam 

Petaluma 6;05 Pm 10:25 am 

Santa Rosa 1 7:85 PM i 6:23 PM 


7:30 AM 
3:30 PM 


8:00 AM 


Fulton, Windsor. 1 1 1025 AM 
Healdhbure:. Lytlon. 
Oeyservllle. Clocerdale 1 7,35 PM 1 6:22 Pm 


7:30 AM 


8:00 AM 


Hopland. tTklah | 7;35 PM | 6:2 2 pm 


7130 AM 1 3.00 AM 
830 PM 1 


« ,„ 1 7:35 pm 1 10:25 am 
Guernevllle 6:*" Pw 


730 AM 1 8:00 AM 
5:J0 Pm 1 5:l»0 pm 


Sonoma i 9:15 am 1 8:40 am 
Olen Ellen 1 6:05 PM | 6:22 PM 


7:30 AM I 8:00 am 
8:30 pm 1 5:00 pm 


a„K„„.~ „i 1 10:40 AM I 10:25 AM 
Sebastopol | 7:35 p M | 6:22 PM 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West 8pringB aod White Sulphur 
Spring?; at Fulton for Altruria; at Lytton for Lytton Springs; at Geyserville 
for Skaggs' Springs; at Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hopland for Duncan 
Springs, Highland Springs, Keleeyville, Carlsbad Springs, Soda Bay, Lake- 
port, and Bartlett SpringB, at TJkiah, for Vichy SprlDgs, 8aratoga*8priDgs, 
Bine Lakes, Lnnrel Del Lake, Witter SpriDgs, Upper Lake, Porno, Potter 
Valley, John Day's, Riverside, Lierley'B, Bucknell's, Sanhedrln Heights, 
Hullville. Booneville, Phllo. Christine Soda Springs, Navarro, Whitesboro, 
Albion, Little River, Orr's Spriogs. Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, Westport, 
TJsal Willits, Laytonville, CnmmiDgs, Bell's Springs, Harris, Oleens, Dover, Scotia 
and Eureka. 

Saturday- to- Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays, Round 
Trip Tickets to all points beyond 8an Rafael at balf rates. 

TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building. 
H. C. WHITING, Gen. Man. B. X. RYAN, Gen. Pass. Agent. 



Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 8teameraIeaveBroadwa y Whu *' 

San FraD Cisco. 



^ 



For Alaskan ports, 11 a.m.: July 5, ]0. 15, 20, 25, 30. 
Aug. 4; change to company's steamers at Seattle. 

For B.C- and Puget Sound Ports, 11 a.m.. July 5, 10, 
15, 20, 25, 30. Aug- 4, and every fifth day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay), 1 :S0 p.m.. July 1, 6, 11, 16. 
21. 2ft. 31. Aug "•• and every fifth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Santa Barbara. Port 
Los Angeles, Redondo (Los Angeles). Steamer "Santa Rosa," Sundays. 
9 a. m.; steamer "State of California." Wednesdays 9 A.M.. 

For Los Angeles, calling at Santa Cruz, Monterey. San Simeon- Cayucos 
Port Harford (San Luis Ob.spo). Qaviota. Santa Barbara, Ventura, Hut- 
neme. San Pedro. East San Pedro, and 'Newport ('Corona only). 
Steamer "Corona." Saturdays. 9 a.m.; Steamer '"Bonlta." Tuesdays 

9 A.M. 

For Mexican Porta. IOa.m., 7ih of each month- 
For further Information obtain Company's folder. 

The company reserves the right to change steamers, sailing dates, and 
hours of sailing, without previous notice. 
TICKET OFFICE— No, 4 New Montgomery street (Palace Hotel). 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen. Agls. 10 Market St.. San Francisco 



8S "Australia." for Tahiti. Tues., Aug 6. 10 a, m. 
SS "Mariposa." Hon o. only, Snt-. Aug 10. at 2 p. m. 
S3 "Sonoma," for Austral iaThurs.. Aug 22, 10 a.m. 
1 lne to Coolgardie. Australia, and Capetown. 
South Africa, 

J. D. SPRECKELS& BROS. CO- 
Agents, 643 Market Street. Freight Office. 3i7 
Market St., San Franclsoo, 




Price per copy, 10 cenU. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856. 

Nb^s|et)tbr 



Annual Subtcrlptlon, M-00 




Volume LXIII. 



SAN FRANCISCO. AUGUST 10. 1901. 



Number 6. 



Primed and published ever* Saturday by the proprietor. FHF.n 
MARRIOTT. .Vj Kearny street, San Kranclsco. Entered al San Fran- 
cisco Poitoflice as second-dais matter. 

The'nfflce ol the S. F. NEWS LETTER in London. Eng., is at 80 Cornhill 
K c. LoDdon, England, (George Street ,v <- u.. Representatives), when 
Information may be obtained regarding subscriptions and advertlBlnfl 
rates. Paris, France— Office, No. 37 Avenue de I/Opera. 

All social Items, announcements, advertising or other matter. Intended for 
publication in the current number of the NEWS LETTER al c.utd be 
sent to this office not later than 6 p.m. Thursday. 

The modern maxim, "war is hell" does not apply in the 
South American republics, where war is politics. 



Detectives have not given up the search for the $ 3 , m I 
stolen from the Mint, nor has the thief given up the $30,000. 



Miguel Malvar, who claims to be AguinaIi,o's successor, 
is too busy issuing proclamations to be of much annoyance 
to the Americans. 



A daily contemporary excitedly announces that the law- 
yers are attacking the new codes. Bless you, that's what 
they were made for. The pronoun applies to either noun. 



Mr. William Jennings Bryan has come out in defense of 
Admiral Schley. In the lamentable trial now pending this 
is the first occurrence prejudicial to the case of the eminent 
sailor. 



If the hotels in San Francisco and Honolulu have refused 
hospitality to the weak Major Strong and the hopeless Lady 
Hope, where in civilization can they find a city sufficiently 
careless to receive them? 



Otto Weinhold, a saloon-keeper at Baker and Lyon streets, 
captured a burglar Monday night. The burglar was very 
unwise. He couldn't expect to be a match for a Presidio 
saloon-keeper. 



The brave sons of Kentucky are degenerating. Thirty men 
met in a pitched battle Sunday, nearly one hundred shots 
were fired, and no one was killed. Feuds will soon be 
as safe and harmless as tennis tournaments, or duels as in- 
terpreted by the French code of honor. 



A Chicago preacher, in addressing a W. C. T. U. meeting 
at Pacific Grove, Sunday, said that socialism is allied to 
Christianity. That is news. We had supposed that, like the 
W. C. T. TJ. movement, it was allied to insanity. 



President Shaffer of the Amalgamated Association says 
that the negoes of the South make the best kind of union 
men. Mr. Shaffer does not explain that it is the black man's 
traditional hatred for work that so well qualifies him. 



Another one. Judge B. C. Rognon, of the United States 
Commissioner's Court at Teller City, has been indicted by 
the Grand Jury for appropriating Government money. Alas- 
kans have cause to exclaim: "Save us from our judiciary." 



The politicians are making a great to-do because Governor 
Gage has appointed Mr. Frank E. Lane a member of the 
Board of Managers for the Stockton Insane Asylum. His 
enemies declare that Mr. Lane has been fighting organized 
labor, has stood in with the wrong push, and done a thou- 
sand and one things to unfit him to judge whether a man is 
insane or not. 



Emperor William of Germany is growing a beard. This 
means that hair on the chin will become all the rage in Ger- 
many. If barbers' unions were as rambunctious in the 
Fatherland as here there would be a general strike. 



The people who complain that the Chinese have no labor 
unions should reflect that the Highbinder Tongs can kill 
off their enemies with far less fuss than the Teamsters' 
Union and with far less inconvenience to the general public. 



Now that the foreign troops are withdrawing from Pekin 
the Chinese are again becoming abusive toward Europeans. 
One of the weak points of the Chinese character is that 
they do not appreciate a good thrashing when they get it. 



The artists of the city are protesting against the gallons 
of gaudy paint about to be smeared over the surface of the 
new City Hall, but the Board of Public Works need not stick 
at considerations of mere art so long as a $10,000 job is in 
sight for some needy contractor. 



Circuit Judge George D. Gear has found a flaw in the 
Hawaiian criminal code by which all the criminals in the 
island may be given their liberty. When the country was 
annexed to the United States she was supposed to share 
with us the blessings of our superior civilization. She is 
sharing it with a vengeance. 



•Pinckney G. Farley, of Salinas, who attempted a few 
weeks ago to kill George Suesser, his brother's murderer, 
has again achieved notoriety. This time he nearly beat a 
preacher to death. Suesser should be given another chance. 
It seems that he killed the wrong member of the family. 



How have the mighty fallen! "Teddy" Roosevelt is hunting 
coyotes in Colorado, where erstwhile nothing less dangerous 
than grizzlies and panthers would satisfy his thirst for 
adventure. Did he clean them all out, or has the unstrenu- 
ous life of the past few months diminished his courage? 
We'll hear of him shooting sparrows next. 



Secrelary McCoy of the Y. M. C. A. is dictating the future 
of the ferryboat bars, while Rev. Frank K. Baker is thrust- 
ing his meddlesome clerical finger into the strike situation. 
Both of these estimable priests were identified directly or 
indirectly with the late lamented army canteen fizzle. If 
they have learned nothing by experience it is to be hoped 
that the public has. 



Miss Mattie Beales, the telephone girl who drew a fine 
claim in the Oklahoma fever land lottery, cannot marry for 
fourteen months without forfeiting her rights to the land. 
There is no doubt that she will have plenty of chances, 
and that the street-car conductor to whom she is engaged 
will have to give up his job and devote his whole attention 
to "holding fast to that which he has." 



Master William Clark Crittenden, the boy Marco Polo of 
the Examiner, has had some rough experiences in his recent 
globe-trot. Crossing the Mediterranean he had to catch a 
siow vessel. At Marseilles he was obliged to pine for sev- 
eral days in a quarantined ship. In San Francisco he was 
forced to exhibit himself to the admiring eyes of our local 
school children. It seems too bad that he had to tackle the 
toughest job on his arrival home, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 10, 1901. 



DEATH OF THE DOWAGER EMPRESS FREDERICK. 

Good Queen Victoria's eldest child has only survived 
her mother by a few short months. The Dowager Empress 
Frederick of Germany, born Princess Royal ot England and 
heir apparent to the British throne, died at Chronberg, on 
Monday last, at the age ot sixty years and nine months. 
The deceased Empress was certainly a most remarkable 
woman. Inheriting the sound common sense of her mother, 
she united with it much of the intellectual brilliancy of her 
rather, who spared no pains in her education. In all his 
walks and talks she was his constant companion. Her tutors 
were of his selecting, and their studies were conducted under 
his special supervision. When only three years of age she 
could speak English, German and French huently. Her 
musical talents were considerable, whilst as a painter and 
sculptor sne excelled. When she was but a mere girl her 
lather required her to read all his letters and his answers 
tnereto; she thereby gained a close insight into European 
politics, as well as into the best manner of treating them. 
Whilst she was yet in her teens her paintings of rural 
scones around London were exhibited publicly and sold 
for the benefit of certain hospitals, realizing quite a consid- 
erable sum. When scarcely twenty years of age she met 
Prince Frederick at Windsor. Queen Victoria has been ac- 
credited with being an adept at match-making, but in this 
instance her services were not required, for it was a case of 
love at sigin. on both sides. On her arrival at Berlin she was 
not, at first, persona grata to the German people, which 
must have been a disappointment to her, accustomed as she 
was to share with her mother the almost idolatrous worship 
ot the English people. Her reception in Berlin contrasted 
strangely with that accorded in London two years later to 
the Danish bride of her brother Edward. But the English 
Princess was not to be daunted. Raised as she was, she 
knew how to set an exalted example at Court without giving 
offense. Soon she disarmed criticism and extorted respect. 
At first she and her husband were given but three rooms 
in the royal palace. Before the birth of her first child, how- 
ever, she gained the consent of the old Emperor to retire 
to the country, where she and her husband raised and edu- 
cated a family, and lived a tranquil and exceedingly happy 
domestic life. Frederick went very little to Court, because 
he was not in harmony with the high-handed and tyrannical 
rule of Bismarck, who was ' practically Emperor at the 
time. The Franco-German war changed things considerably. 
It sent Frederick to the front as one of the ablest statesmen 
and soldiers of his time. It is history that he, and not Bis- 
marck, first suggested the process by which Germany was 
unified. The time had now come when the Crown Prince 
could no longer be left out of the councils of the nation. 
The harmonizing and mollifying influence which the new 
Councillor of State wielded over the widely dissimilar States 
is too long a story to tell here, but it is safe to say that had 
there been only a Bismarck, and not a Frederick and his 
wife, the attempts at unification would not have met with the 
success they did. Frederick the Noble, as he now came to 
be called, became the hope of the German people. The old 
Emperor was nearing his end, and Bismarck, though retained 
in office, was shorn of all real power. Unhappily, when 
about to enter upon his inheritance and fulfill the desires of 
his people, Frederick was seized with a disease, cancer of 
the throat, against which medical skill did not permanently 
avail. Then began that battle royal between Bismarck and 
the dying man's good little English wife, to which history 
a:one will do justice. Under a law of Germany, no Prince 
afflicted with an incurable disease is eligible to mount the 
throne. But who could at that time say that Frederick's 
disease was "incurable?" Bismarck was determined to find 
somebody who would, while the wife was as determined that 
he shouia not. She hied with her husband to a more balmy 
climate, sent to London for the noted specialist, Dr. Macken- 
zie, whose repute was world-wide, and whose professional 
word was hardly to be gainsaid, and together they took coun- 
sel. Mackenzie denied that the disease was incurable; and, 
as if to prove his words, began a course of treatment that 
so greatly ameliorated the conditions as to raise high hopes 
of an ultimate recovery. Professor Virchow and the other 
German doctors stood back silenced. Mackenzie and the 
good wife nursed Frederick for fifteen long months, during 
which time he was crowned, and "that Englishwoman," as 



Bismarck contemptuously called her, became Empress of 
Germany. She lived to relegate the man of blood and iron 
to his country seat, where he passed away a disappointed and 
disgruntled old man. 



STRIKING SCENES IN OUR MIDST. 

It is well that there is no great influx of visitors to San 
Francisco just now. The Epworlu Leaguers got away from 
us just in time, or their baggage could not have been hauled 
from the ferries. Fortunately there are no other large dele- 
gations on the way here. If we were to get the national con- 
vention of either of the great parties, and the unions, in fur- 
therance of their policy of making the most mischief possi- 
ble, were to call a strike along the city front at or about 
the time of the arrival of the delegates, the inconvenience 
would be intolerable and the humiliation of San Francisco 
complete. And for that very reason we think this thing 
will happen some day. It would be just like the unions to 
show their teeth at the most perilous moment. They order 
no strikes in the winter or early spring, but wait until or- 
chardists must get their fruit to market or let it rot on the 
trees. That is what it is doing to-day. It was early suggested 
to the unions that an exception might be made in favor of 
handling fruit because of its perishable nature, and the 
ruin that would otherwise result to the tillers of the soil 
who benefit the poor of our cities with their cheap foods, 
but the suggestion was received with scorn. San Fran- 
cisco cannot be said just now to be a law-abiding, peace- 
ful city. Not a day passes by but violence and riot are com- 
mitted. Men are daily being assailed, beaten and in a few 
cases shot, for no better reason than that they are working 
for a wage they probably need to keep their children 
from starving. Merchants have had to turn out and haul 
their own goods from the wharf, helped In many cases by 
their clerks and porters, but not one of these dare move 
unless accompanied by a policeman on horseback or seated 
alongside of the driver. Mobs crowd the wharves, intimidate 
the chicken-hearted, and hoot and jeer and sometimes as- 
sault those who have some courage. All of which is incip- 
ient riot, and ought to be put an end to at all hazards. Yet 
H has been going on whilst the Chief Magistrate of the city 
and the Chief Magistrate of the State have been dallying 
with the strike leaders and appealing to their consciences 
and reason, just as if they had any. The Mayor should take 
a sufficient guard to the wharf, read the riot act, and compel 
that crowd to stand not upon the order of its going, but to 
go. If it attempted to re-assemble on the wharves or 
other public highways the Governor should call out the Na- 
tional Guard and put an end to the prevailing reign of ter- 
ror. It is time to act. Steamers are tied up, the port prac- 
tically closed, commerce suspended, life and property in 
danger and officialdom is asleep. 



THE MAN WHO LEADS THE NATIONAL GUARD. 

It is unfortunate at this critical moment that the National 
Guard of California should be under the command of an in- 
competent and cowardly officer, who knows no duty save 
the preservation of his own skin. He has been tried once 
and that was the record he made. At the time of the strike 
ot railroad employees some years ago, he was sent with 
the State militia to preserve order at Sacramento. The 
railroad depot was taken possession of by the strikers, 
who were violent and riotous. General John H. Dickinson 
was ordered by his commanding officer to proceed with his 
men to the depot and force the mob out. Dickinson started 
with his command, but halted it on a by-street, and from 
there he could not be got to move. Incalculable injury was 
done in the neighborhood of the depot which he ought 
to have prevented. He disobeyed orders and a court of in- 
quiry found the facts to be as stated. For a time he dropped 
out of military affairs. But getting himself elected Senator 
from Sausalito. and Governor Gage having need of his vote, 
bought it with the Major-Generalship of the National Guard, 
in which position he has just again proven himself, accord- 
ing to official reports, an incompetent and worse. His man- 
agement of Camp Gage at Santa Cruz a few weeks ago has 
been reported upon by military officers and has been pro- 






August 10. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



Bounced a lamentable Dasoo. One offlcer says through U 

iimns of the Chronicle thai "the troui>|.' with C 

thai il was too l"lg a proposition for the man ll 
mand of it." and the officer then follows up this gi 
statement with details as astounding as any thai 

■ I at the head of a man in command of troops. Tin 

mi strike troubles look ominous, and no man can tell 

how they may end. Dickinson should for the State's safety 

lleved of his command at once. The Qoverno 
drill sufficient cause for the removal In the official report 
of the doings at Camp Gage, now in his possession Gen 
eral Dickinson never has filled an official position with 
advantage to the State. It will be recalled how his first 
entry into the Senate was marked by the establishment of 
the notorious "Robbers' Roost." 



MANY USES FOR MORE CHINESE. 

The Bulletin says that "Eastern opponents of the exclusion 
of Chinese laborers are much encouraged by an editorial in 
the San Francisco News Letter opposing the re-enactment of 
the Chinese exclusion law. The News Letter takes the 
ground that there are not enough white workers to perform 
certain classes of labor that need to be done; that the Chin- 
ese are needed in our fields, our factories, and in household 
service. The present labor troubles are referred to as evi- 
dence that white labor cannot be relied upon to do the work 
that needs to be done." 

We nnd no fault with our contemporary's statement of our 
position. For all practical purposes it has come near 
enougn presenting it correctly, which we regret to say is not 
the common practice with newspaper disputants hereabouts. 
The Bulletin does not attempt to controvert our facts, but 
practically admits them when it says that "there are reme- 
dies that are far worse than the disease they are intended to 
cure." The disease, it will ue seen, is admitted, but the pro- 
posed cure is claimed to be a worse evil. How and in what 
respect? To over-supply the demand for labor would no 
doubt be an evil, but the News Letter has from the first 
taken the position that the immigration should be restricted 
to the necessities of the local situation. What harm is 
there in that? If the white laborer is not here in sufficient 
numbers, or if he organizes to put himself out of work, he 
being at the same time adequately recompensed, as is ad- 
mittedly the case at present, where can be the objection to 
permitting the little brown man to take up the tools of trade, 
to the end that the business of the country may be permitted 
to proceed? Is a closed port or paralyzed industries, or a 
commerce threatened with ruin, a less evil than the employ- 
ment of a man with a yellow skin instead of a white one? 
As a matter of fact, the business of our port and State have 
developed out of all proportion to the supply of reasonable 
labor. White workers are not coming here, nor are they 
likely to come in the near future, yet the demand for them 
is increasing all the time. \v hile this is true, the Chinese in 
our midst are twenty thousand fewer than they were ten 
years ago. If we could absorb twenty thousand more then, 
we can surely do with a few more now. Our grain fields, our 
orchards, our hop vines, our canneries, our salmon packs, 
etc., depend upon Chinese labor for their success. White 
laborers prefer the city, where these industries are not 
carried on. Moreover, while we are forcing our way into 
China, it is not in human reason to justify the exclusion of 
the Chinese from America. 



A PLAY TO THE GALLERY. 

The Yellow Monarch has at last done the inevitable and 
come out openly in a mud bombardment directed against the 
members of the Employers' Association, who have had the 
well being of the city and State enough at heart to stand out 
against the striking draymen and the general hobo war 
along the water front. The yellow editorial which opened 
up the battle was notable for the seas of socialistic Exami- 
ner fallacies with which it swamped the reader. Being a 
play to the ignorant classes it made no attempt at convic- 
tion through the reason, but through the emotions and preju- 
dices of its readers. The ruffian who establishes a reign of 
terror along the city's front is held up as a devoted patriot, 
jeopardizing his all to benefit his home and country, while 



the members of the Bmplo latlon wine and dine 

in their chili rooms an. I boasl of the downfall of the masses. 

Whether a jobbing house pan it-, teamsters j.t a day or 
cut* no figure," we quote them as saying, just to gtra 
a sample nf the peculiar logic by which tin- Monarch's writer 
'■I convince. "The Jobber is a mere convenlenci 

0D in say. "whose elimination would enuse but small 

annoyance to tin- greal mass of the population. Co-operation 

will kill the jobber in an instant." The Examiner does not 
want co-operation, it thrives on discord, in the present 
tight the- ICxaminer has thrown all Slate pride, all dtj pride 

in the wind, and taken the side of the rabble — where the 
largest amount of circulation lies. Our commerce, trade 
ami business amount to nothing, it says In substance, and the 
capital of the East could crush it in a moment. A fine 
advertisement for the State! A fine estimate of California 
brains and enterprise! Mr. Frank J. Symmes of the Mer- 
' hants' Association has also come in for a deal of abuse at 
the hands of the Yellow Monarch, because, forsooth, he told 
the farmers in few words and blunt that if the strike was to 
continue as it had with no regard being shown on the 
part of the unions for either consumer or buyer, the farmers 
of the State might expect to take their share of the 
loss. This is no less than the farmers may expect, for, 
as employers of large numbers of men, they should 
stand with the merchants of San Francisco in what, 
as Mr. Symmes has said, "is a fight of principle." Mr. 
Symmes, as spokesman for the merchants, knows well 
that the merchants are by long odds the heaviest losers 
in the present struggle. The strike is of course deplorable 
in every particular, but the farming classes should come to 
understand that it costs money to teach the strikers a lesson 
in their present battle of selfishness and unreason. 



IT IS LEGAL TO ATTACH THE FUNDS OF THE LABOR 
UNIONS. 

The highest appellate court in England, made up of the new 
law lords of the Privy Council, has just rendered a decision 
which nas an important bearing upon the labor troubles of 
England as well as upon those of this country. It is a 
common law decision, and as such applicable to the condi- 
tions that prevail in both countries. The case passed upon 
was one in which an employer brought suit to recover dam- 
ages done to his business through the "picketing" of the 
union, and for an order attaching its funds pending trial. 
The court below granted the order, and from it an appeal 
was taken. The union was not advised that the court below 
erred in its interpretation of the law, but that the facts did 
not justify its decision. It appears that the strikers went 
out on their own motion and without the advice or consent 
of the union. When they were out, however, they wrote to 
that ooay asking for its approval and aid in conducting the 
strike. These were readily granted, and the secretary of the 
union was appointed to manage the strike. The Appellate 
Court has now decided (1) that the plaintiff suffered damage 
through the "picketing," and was entitled to recover the 
amount thereof; (2) that the union had made itself respon- 
sible by its participation in what took place, and (3) that the 
order of attachment was proper. It is a very plain and an ex- 
ceedingly far-reaching decision. It will permit of the 
union's funds being tied up for an indefinite period. Nay, 
more, it would apply those funds to the last dollar, if neces- 
sary to the liquidation of any damages or loss sustained by 
force on the part of employees acting under the instructions 
of their union. That is the view taken by Mr. Keir Hardy, 
the well-known Labor member of Parliament, who in an 
interview published in the Daily Express, says that for the 
time being the decision paralyzes the effective arms of the 
unions, which will have to rest awhile and consider the new 
situation. There never was any doubt in the minds of 
capable jurists that these would be the final determinations 
of the law. This journal has again and again pointed that 
out. There was always some doubt as to what an elective 
judiciary might do, but there was a way in which to get 
before the Federal Courts. The port of San Francisco is 
at this moment practically closed to commerce by reason of 
the illegal acts of the unions. Cases could be made up 
that would open it within forty-eight hours. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 10, 1901. 



A SUGGESTIVE OCEAN RACE. 
It is in contemplation to establish a fortnightly steam line 
between New York and Australia. When the Nicaragua 
Canal is cut it will be an easy thing to do, but at present the 
distance is rather too long tor a steaming passage. Still, 
it can be and is being done. On Thursday of last week two 
English tramp steamers started on an ocean race from New 
York to Melbourne, which is being watched, says the Com- 
mercial Advertiser, with great interest in shipping circles. 
The Indralema and Devon passed Sandy Hook within four 
hours of each other. Their speed is about equal, and the 
long voyage will probably take about forty-six days. While 
ocean racing is forbidden by law, and no one in the shipping 
business is ever willing to admit that a vessel he is inter- 
ested in would take part in such a contest, there is no doubt 
that this is a sure enough race. Both steamers carry im- 
mense cargoes of American manufactured goods. The In- 
dralema has on board 700 tons of rails and girders. The 
balance of her 11,000 tons is measured cargo of all kinds of 
wooden goods, pianos, organs, churns, wagons, wheels, bicy- 
cles, and about everything else that is made in the United 
States, including sixty tons of rifle and shotgun cartridges. 
The distance to Melbourne is about 13,500 miles, and there is 
no doubt felt that all that money and skill can do will be 
used in trying to get the rival ships there in the fastest 
possible time. In all this, there should be a lesson for the 
Pacific Coast. Why should not this valuable trade be 
handled from the port of San Francisco? We are nearer 
than New York is to the Australian ports by one-half. We 
have a batter ocean for steam, and more conveniently placed 
coaling stations on the way. The distance is now being 
steamed in twenty-two or twenty-three days. This paper 
has labored for years not without some success to bring 
about closer trade relations with all the Australian colonies, 
as well as New Zealand. It is conscious, however, that a 
very great deal more remains to be accomplished in that di- 
rection, and it would like to see our merchants in earnest in 
accomplishing it. The American trade of the Pacific should 
be made to come this way. If we get it into our groove be- 
fore tae canal is built, it will be hard to take it away from 
us afterwards. 



AS TO THE BOER RECONCENTRADOS. 

Says the British-hating Chronicle of this city: "The truth 
is that the reconcentrado policy which the British are en- 
forcing in South Africa does not differ in any essential 
particular from that which, when practiced by the Spanish in 
Cuba, excited the horror of the civilized world." Nonsense! 
The Chronicle has said this many times before and keeps 
on saying it with wearisome reiteration, in the hope that oft- 
repetition will cause it to be believed. The truth is the 
British taxpayers are bearing an enormous expense to save 
the Boer women and children from the consequences of 
their own people's folly. No more considerate or charitable 
act was ever performed in war than that which the British 
are now doing for the wives and children of their enemy. 
The war, for all practical purposes, is over, and a better 
government than the Boers ever knew is ready to be insti- 
tuted, but the men, instead of returning to their homes and 
providing for their wives and children, hide themselves 
behind rocks and kopjes, and sally forth whenever it is safe 
to do so and slaughter British officers and men. The British 
are meanwhile keeping their families from starving. Forty 
thousand individuals are fairly well housed and are being 
better fed than the British soldiers. Most of these indi- 
viduals have come in voluntarily for the food and shelter 
they are now receiving. The facts are well known, being 
the subject of official reports presented to the House of Com- 
mons. The Chronicle knows the facts, but chooses to sup- 
press them in order to please a certain class of its sub- 
scribers. It has, however, other patrons to whom its course 
is an abomination. Any indignant British sympathizer, who 
might care to take the trouble, could easily organize a raid 
on the Chronicle's advertising columns that would quickly 
make it shout the other way on demand, hut as a phleg- 
matic Englishman said the other day: "It pleases its low 
subscribers and does us no harm." It remains, however, 
that the "popular" daily of the period can be the falsest 
and meanest thing on earth. 



NOW IT IS THE SERVANT GIRLS. 
The female workers, not to be outdone by the males, pro- 
pose to become "unionized." The spirit of the strikers has 
penetrated the pantries and kitchens of Chicago, and a ser- 
vant giils' association, called "The Working Women of 
America," has been formed with a set of rules that will 
elevate its members to a plane higher than that trodden by 
men. Work shall cease when the dinner dishes are washed 
and put away. Two hours each afternoon and an entire even- 
ing at least twice a week shall be allowed the domestic as 
her own. "There shall be no opposition on the part of the 
mistress to club life on the part of the domestic." "Gentle- 
men friends shall not be barred from the kitchen or the back 
porch," and "Members of the family shall not interrupt the 
conversation during said visits." "Domestics shall be free 
to supply at their own expense refreshments to their visit- 
ors." On Mondays such hours off shall be allowed as will 
"permit domestics to visit bargain counters and enjoy the 
same privileges as the mistress and her daughters." A wage 
scale will be adopted, no reduction will be permitted, and 
all complaints must be made to the agent of the union. A 
large club house has been secured, and a lady manager of 
the union has been appointed, who is said to possess unusual 
organizing abilities. Already the new union is very much in 
evidence and assurances are given by its promoters that it 
has "come to stay." They claim that soon there will not 
be a domestic in Cook County outside of the union. Nothing 
appears to be lacking save a list of fines on the mistress or 
male head of the house for "kicking" about tne cooking, or 
disturbing the conversation of the ladies and gentlemen 
assembled in the kitchen or on the back porch. The rights 
of women and their higher culture must be provided for at 
all hazards. There appears to be no reason known among 
the working women of the day why a domestic should not 
be as socially important, as well dressed, and as much at 
her ease as the mistress of the mostly lordly mansion in the 
land. And with all this no American women are to be ex- 
pected to do household washing — not even her own. That 
is to be left to the Chinese help, and will necessitate the 
repeal of the exclusion law. 



LYNCHERS AS AMATEUR DETECTIVES. 

Women are the latest victims of the lawless Southerners 
— Southerners, whose chief boast has always been their 
chivalry. To be sure, those lynched were negroes, who 
don't count much in the South, but they were women, and, 
what is more, their guilt had not been proven. Further, 
they were safely in jail, awaiting trial. All this happened at 
Carrollton, Mississippi, last week. The victims were Betsy, 
Belfield and Ida McCray, mother, son and daughter, who had 
been arrested for complicity in a murder. A mob of five 
hundred men took them to the outskirts of town, hanged 
them to a tree and riddled their bodies with bullets. They 
begged and pleaded for mercy, and cuizens less brutal than 
the lynchers begged and pleaded for law and order. But 
these chivalrous Southerners were not to be stayed, and 
finished their bloody, murderous work. It is not long ago 
that wild-eyed Bryanites from South of the line made vigor- 
ous protest against the electrocution in New York of a con- 
victed murderess on the ground that she was a woman. 
Now the same people dispense with all forms of law and 
lynch suspects — women at that. 

The acts of these lawless people are nothing short of mur- 
der — murder, plain, pure and simple. There have been 
cases of lynching which were almost justifiable. But in 
the South, of late years, suspicion of a negro has meant his 
doom — they have been treated as witches in Puritan days; 
hanged either for confessing or not confessing. It is safe 
to say that in two-thirds of the lynching cases in the South 
the wrong man was killed. In nearly every instance the 
hanging or torturing was done within a day or two after 
the discovery of the crime — in many instances on the same 
day. Where did these people — most of them ignorant and 
uncouth — acquire such detective powers? Our trained 
sleuths spend days, weeks and months in ferreting out 
criminals. But these wise Southerners do not need even 
a clew. A crime, a negro handy and a tree near by are all 
that are necessary for the consummation of justice, accord- 
ing to tneir idea of it. They have arrogated to themselves 
detective and judiciary powers, with deplorable results. 



August 10. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Ha^bit Backs. Tucks and Flounces 



By Mrs. Chauncey DeWit. 

Mrs. Avery McCarthy has been dubbed the smartest 
gowned matron of the season. Wherever she go 
Coronado. Del Monte or the Springs, her costumes are 
lorgnetted fervidly. Mrs. McCarthy was proclaimed the 
most beautifully gowned woman at the opera — not an easy 
reputation to live up to. when one goes every other night. 
But it is still harder to be unvaryingly beautiful at a fash- 
ionable resort. The setting at the opera and the decollette 
gowns are kindly, but lamp light beauties are unmasked in 
the glare of the compromising sun, and P. M. reputations 
tor beauty are often shattered at G. M. Then, too, there are 
few women who have mastered the art of morning, after- 
noon and evening gowns — it is a trinity beyond the artistic 
ken of the average modish. Mrs. Jim Follis is beautiful in 
full evening dress, Mrs. Joe Tobin is stunning in a recep- 
tion gown, Mrs. Walter Hobart is loveliest in a simple morn- 
ing gown in her own home. But name me the woman who 
can do the presto change for morning, noon and night with 
equal success. "Mrs. McCarthy," chorus a crowd of that 
handsome woman's admirers. And of a truth I must echo 
them — for I have never seen Mrs. McCarthy in a "this will 
do" gown. She can ring in all the changes that the clock 
demands with exquisite finesse. 

A black dinner gown that Mrs. McCarthy wears is fash- 
ioned of a black transparent crepe, distinguished from 
myriad other crepes as "LAiglon." The gown is made 
Princess style, the underlining cut away to allow the neck 
and arms to gleam through the crepe. The elbow sleeves 
are nnisned with three half-inch bias folds, relieved with a 
taussard of black mesh lace. The sweeping circular skirt 
is finished with five bias folds. The a la Bernhardt effect 
of the gown is heightened by a black mousseline girdle 
drawn down to out-kangaroo Sara and falling in long ends 
to the noor. 

A veranda frock of Mrs. McCarthy's that has individuality 
sewed into every seam is of sheer black organdy tucked 
from collar to hem. A hint of the arms and neck is af- 
forded by the unlined sleeves and yoke. The sleeves^ are 
finished with a point of black guimpure at the hand, and 
an insertion of the same guimpure joins the full flounce to 
the circular skirt, which is cut with the habit back — of 
which more anon. A black Louisine sash tied at the side 
completes this fetching costume. 

In an Empire morning gown of white crepe de chine cut 
very decollette, Mrs. McCarthy is enchanting. The gown 
is serpentinely empire, with a long sash and chrysanthemum 
rosette of chiffon finishing the yoke. Of course this gown 
is for boudoir wear only, but a pity it is, for it is too pretty 
to blush unseen. 

Apropos of "habit" back skirts, they are very much to 
the fore again for all gowns save tailor made. For pret- 
tily rounded hips the "habit" back is charming, but for the 
angular it presupposes judicious padding. For evening 
gowns the "habit" back is exceedingly pretty. 

Mollie Thomas McMullin and her mother might easily be 
mistaken for sisters, especially when Mrs. Thomas is in 
street attire. She is a grandmother with the slender girlish 
figure of a maiden, and does not shy at light colors. A 
street gown that Mrs. Thomas is wearing is a blue veiling 
over a foundation of blue taffeta. The flounced skirt has 
an insertion of ecru Russian lace and the bodice consists 
of a bolero of the blue veiling showing the snug fitting Rus- 
sian lace underneath. A rosette and long ends of blue chiffon 
give a charming effect to the jacket. A smart hat with blue 
and white trimming completes the costume. Mrs. Thomas' 
veils are what the small boy would call "keen stunts." They 
are high art in that they conceal how artful they are — and 
also conceal the few lines of Time on her countenance. 

Another smart gown Mrs. Tnomas wears on the street 
is a black brilliantine with a tiny white polka dot. The 
skirt and jacket are trimmed with bands of black and white 
cloth. A fluffy boa of black and white chiffon and chic 
white and black walking hat are fitting accompaniments for 
the gown. 

One of the daintiest gowns at Miss Gage's wedding the 



other night was worn by Miss Kathryn Ch.ibot. It stood 
out for Its very simplicity. The low-necked organdy bodice 
was trimmed with a bertha . n t In large double points and 
edged with Valendennaa lace. White taffeta ribbon was 
knotted over a bertha and the tronl ..f the tucked bodlco 
had a pointed Insert of the same lace. The skirt was tucked 
diagonally to match and finished with a flou 

A pretty royal blue veiling gown was worn by Miss Caro 
Crocket on her last Saturday afternoon excursion to town. 
The bodice has a broad sailor collar of coarse mesh ecru 
lace, and the skirt has spaced fine tucks over the hips, the 
flounce showing tucks clustered in the same fashion. A 
touch of pink on the hat strikes the keynote of the new 
color combinations. 



There is nothing like Cameiiine to protect the face 

f:om the wind and sun and keep the skin fresh and clear. 
It is used and indorsed by Mrs. Terry, Mrs. Kendall, Adelina 
Patti and many other notables. 



Valuable 

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when you can rent a 
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AND TRUST COMPANY, 

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WIH. WILLIAMS & SONS 

(LTD.) OF ABERDEEN. 

Scotch_Whisky 

Importers • MACONDRAY & CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 10, 1901. 




Measure!* 
Wand 



Oft chef no wand butTltasun 's .\* 



Margaret Anglin is not technically a star. She is merely 
a factor of the Empire Theatre Company. But in the produc- 
tion by tnat company of "Mrs. Dane's Defense" she attains 
to "stellar" dignity and honors the precedence that her art 
so easily wins for her. and which our admiration so readily 
concedes. Miss Anglin focused the attention of a large and 
singularly attentive audience on Monday night in spite of 
the admirable work of her admirable "support," and, except 
for a general approval for the others and some special com- 
mendation for Mr. Richman, it was her triumph, I am sure, 
that made most of the conversation around the supper tables 
at Zinkand's and on the cars as they scaled the hills with the 
homeward-bound. There was something of the old Bald- 
win days about this opening of the Empire Theatre Com- 
pany, which has changed its personnel since then and if 
anything has gained in smoothness and poise. There was 
the same upper-tension in the audience, and (which is quite 
different), an atmosphere of good breeding on the stage. The 
company acted like ladies and gentlemen, and. it must be ad- 
mitted, the audience did likewise. 

* * * 

It is not necessary to tell at length the story of "Mrs. 
Dane's Defense," which in point of fact is quite meagre. 
All that is vital in the plot is concentrated in a painfully 
intense scene in the third act. Mrs. Dane, whose past is a 
reproach, is hounded in her conscientious endeavor to re- 
trieve it by Mrs. Bulsom-Porter, the self-constituted vise 
committee of Sunningwater society. Compelled to avoid ex- 
posure by deceit, Mrs. Dane becomes involved in a fabric 
of lies, and when cross-examined by Sir Daniel Carteret, 
whose son she loves, she adds falsehood to falsehood until 
her secret is wrung from her and the truth in all its hideous- 
ness is laid bare. This scene of Sir Daniel on one side, the 
stern, inexorable jurist, and on the other the soul-racked 
sufferer fighting the truth for her honor and love, is sure in 
touch and treatment, and dramatically powerful. It is keen 
by concentration, for Jones does not depend for his effect 
upon the tricks of the commercial play-makers. The other 
three acts are comparatively thin, but clever after the well- 
known manner of the author. On Monday night, however, 
the audience, evidently awed by rumors of the play's vogue 
in London and the East, was noticeably reverent in its 
si,ent avidity for every syllable of commonplace and redund- 
ant dialogue. There is a great deal of sermonizing through- 
out the play upon the eternal laws that govern the relations 
of men and women, which Sir Daniel reduces to a moral in 
the words: "The rules of the game are severe; if you (mean- 
ing women) don't like them, leave it alone." 

* * * 

Miss xinglin's acting was a surprise. This in spite of the 
admiration we bestowed upon her in times past. Her tem- 
perament was always a delight in its delicacy, art and charm, 
but she has gained in depth and emotion — or perhaps I 
should say that the part of Mrs. Dane serves to make mani- 
fest these qualities which we were not permitted to suspect 
in her lighter essays. She has the personal spell of the 
true artist — I had almost said genius — and she displays in 
her art something finer than intelligence, something that 
should place within her g'-asp the highest prizes of her pro- 
fession. Mr. Richman, too, has widened his scope since his 
Daly days, and we find him matured and strengthened. His 
Sir Daniel is careful, firm and convincing. The part is one 
of the finest dignity and subtle strength, and Mr. Richman 
lives it to identity. The difficulties of such a part as that of 
Lady Eastney, which demands much in composure, refine- 
ment and air, are gracefully overcome by Ethel Hornick, 
who deserves more credit for the faithfulness of her por- 
traiture than the casual observer will yield to her. Mr. 
Crompton as the prelate is in perfect character, and fixes 
the image with delightful subtleties of voice and manner. 
May Brooke is truthfully disagreeable as Mrs. Bulsom- 



Porter, and acts admirably, although she pronounces antece- 
dents with the accent on the first syllable. Margaret Dale 
and Mr. Wallace Worsley as Janet Colquhoun and Lionel 
Carteret are youthful and sympathetic in their parts. Mr. 
Stanley Dart as Mr. Rigsby is gentlemanly and talks well. 
To complete the catalogue. Mr. George Osbourne, Jr., is in 
every way adequate to the role of Fendick, the detective, 
and Mr. Backus makes a success of Bulsom-Porter, although 
he strikes the only false notes in the performance by intro- 
ducing a touch of low comedy in some of his postures and 
exits. 

* * * 

The Tivoli is drawing unprecedented crowds for its sea- 
son of grand opera. "Trovatore" has been packing the house 
this week with "Lucia" on the alternating nights a good sec- 
ond. Russo and Castellano are alternating as Manrico, and 
the former's performance is in every way better than the 
•atter's. Even in the "Di quela pira," which calls for a ro- 
bust quality. Russo is more effective than his strenuous rival. 
As for that splendid test for a tenor. "Ah! si, ben mio," it 
is quite beyond the vocal grasp of Castellano. The most 
enjoyable feature of the performance was. of course, Sa- 
lassa's di Luna — a superb figure nobly acted and beautifully 
sung. His "II balen" is worth the whole performance. Col- 
lamarini is at times strongly dramatic as Azucena. but her 
gutteral slurs are, as ever, disagreeable. 

* * * 

"Lucia" is excellently cast, and, like the "Rigoletto" of 
last week was a more satisfying performance than its alter- 
nating opera. Russo and Repetto made their first appear- 
ance in San Francisco in "Lucia," and it was also one of 
Ferrari's first essays amongst us. Since then this cast of 
principals have been heard frequently in the opera, and al- 
ways with eminently good effect. Ferrari is rather harsh for 
Donizetti's suave and moderately dramatic measures, but 
his resonant voice, which is a miracle of carrying power, is 
effective in the solos and useful in the ensembles. It serves 
as a firm foundation for the sextet which long experience 
in singing together enables these three artists to render 
nobly. Repetto's mad scene is something I shall never tire 
of praising. Not only does she negotiate the cadenzas — 
which, by the way, are those of her famous namesake — ■ 
but in the cantabile passages she sings with more sympathy 
and warmth than one usually finds in a coloratura. 

* * * 

"Camille" is the best advertised play that has ever 
been presented on the stage. The announcement of a 
performance of it awakes widespread attention among 
women, the majority of whom. I regret to say, have no inter- 
est whatever in La Dame aux Camelias more than that she 
was an unchaste coquette. It is this pornial appetite — this 
desire to see the life of a courtesan laid bare — that makes 
women flock to "Camille." though they have already seen 
it a dozen times; and it is the same pervert taste that makes 
as great a book as "Cousine Bette" entice them. It is not 
surprising, therefore, that the Alcazar should be filled every 
night this week, for Florence Roberts is again playing 
Camille. I prophesy a "sell-out" at the matinee. Miss Rob- 
erts' "Camille" is no more exciting than the other things she 
has done, but clever in that mimetic, artful way of hers. 
The support is uneven, and quite weird in spots, with Mr. 
White Whittlesey doing capital work as Armand. 

* * * 

The Orpheum programme is an improvement upon that 
of last week, which was quite indifferent. Mr. and Mrs. 
Relcey are the head liners, in an original sketch which fea- 
tures the bill. 

PORTER GARNETT. 



Charlotte Thompson's new play, "Silver Mounted Har- 
ness," will be given its initial production at the Alcazar next 
week with Miss Florence Roberts in the leading part. 
The cast will include Messrs. White Whittlesey. Lucius Hen- 
derson, George Webster, Carlyle Moore, Frank Bacon, Paul 
Gerson, Jack Morris, and Lillian Armsby, Marie Howe, 
Agnes Rankin, Edith Angus, Georgie Cooper. Stella Razeto. 
* * * 

"Trovatore" is sung at the Tivoli for the last time to-night, 
and "Lucia" to-morrow night. For the third week of 
the grand opera season the management announces two 



August 10. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



La Favorite" ami Vit.Ii 
wnlch win alternate, the ilrsi named being produi 
Monday, Agostinl will have his favorite pan of rVr- 
dlnand; The Kins will !»■ suns by Ferrari, and .\u- 
gusto Dado has the bass role of Balthazar Colla- 
marlni is to be the heroine Leonora; Faccl is tl 
par. and Sannle Kruger, [nee, in "Otello" Salassa will figure 
again as the scheming [ago; Caltellano will sing the name 
part, ulnda Hontenarl wil make her debut as uesdemona. 
Lia Poletim has the contralto part of Emelia. and the numer- 
ous male assignments are in the hands of Napoleoni. Zanl, 
Cortesi. Faccl, and Richards. 

• • • 

The Empire Theatre Company continues another week it 
the Columbia. Mr. Daniel Frohman's Company, headed by 
Hilda Spong. and presenting Mr. R. C. Carton's comedy, 
"Lady Huntworth's Experiment." will follow, opening on 
August 19th. 

• * * 

At the Orpheum next week Mr. Frank Currier, Mr. Charles 
Bradshaw, Meta Baitton and Minnie Monk will present the 
sketch. "Fix in a Fix." Remarc & Riley are European 
grotesques. Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Kelcey will appear in a 
comedietta. "Uncle Phineas." Mr. Oscar P. Sisson and Es- 
ter Wallace will give a skit entitled "Love Finds a Way." 
Among the others are Hill & Silvany, the Standard Quar- 
tette, Alexandra Dagmar, the Molassi-Salvaggi troupe, and 
the biograph. 

* * * 

On Monday, August 26th, Ringling Brothers' circus will 
begin a seven days' engagement in San Francisco. Last year 
it came here for the first time unannounced and un- 
known, and gained immediate favor. This year it is even 
better. It has more performers, more sensational acts, and 
has been enlarged in several of its important branches. 
One of the acts is that in which twenty trained elephants 
take part. Many additions have been made to the menagerie, 
and the street parade vfill be extremely picturesque. 



THE CHRISTY & WISE COMMISSION COMPANY. 

("his corporation has just moved from 327 Sansome street 
to 223-225 California street, just below Battery. The move 
was made to provide more commodious premises for the 
increasing business of this firm. Their trade has so im- 
proved during the past year that they have entirely out- 
grown their old quarters. On the first of the year the direc- 
tory of the corporation was changed and the capital stock 
was increased to $45,000. The present directors and officers 
are as follows: Mr. Charles M. Reynolds, President; Mr. 
S. H. May, Vice-President; Mr. Varney W. Gaskill, Secre- 
tary; Mr. Charles W. Clark and Mr. S. H Cheda, Direc- 
tors. Mr. Charles M. Reynolds was the former secretary of 
the corporation, and is well and favorably known in the busi- 
ness world. Mr. S. H. May is a very prominent traveller 
for Eastern firms. Mr. Varney Gaskill is well known 
throughout the State for his executive ability. Mr. Charles 
W. Clark is twice over a millionaire, and is of the firm of 
Cox & Clark of Sacramento. Mr.' S. H. Cheda is cashier 
and manager of the Bank of Marin County, at San Rafael. 

The prospects of this enterprising firm are excellent. 
They are sole agents for Hunter Baltimore Rye and Black 
and White Scotch Whiskey, as well as being general import- 
ing and commission merchants. 



Mme. Julie Rosewald will be at home for the reception of 
pupils and the arrangement for hours, on Tuesday and Wed- 
nesday, August 13th and 14th, at the Hotel Granada, corner 
Sutter and Hyde streets. 



Melons, alligator pears, all kinds of fresh fruit and 

vegetables at Omey & Goetting's, stalls 33-34-4o-46 California 
Market. Goods the best and always fresh. 



St. Louis A. B. C. Bohemian, the king of all bottled 

beers, brewed from the finest Canadian Barley and imported 
Bohemian Hops. 



The best people in town patronize Techau Tavern. 

An orchestra plays every evening. It is a favorite meeting 
place after the theater. 



- NewE"3la«d , 
Conservatory 

OF MUSIC 



Forty-eight years of constant and 
healthful progress and growth has put 
this institution at the head (both in size 
and standing) of musical institutions 
in America. Comprehensive in plan, 
moderate in price, thorough in practice 
and famous for results. 

GEO. W. CBADWICK. Muilcal Director. 
Send for music ind elocution i Malosuts. 
FRAHK W. HALE, General Manager, Bolton, Uau. 



Columbia Theatre. OOTTLOB ' i^eef and i 



Beclnninp; Next MONDAY. 
FROHMAN'S 



Managers. 
Second and Last Week. CHARLES 



EMPIRE THEATRE COMPANY 

Presenting Henry Arthur Jones' greatest play, 

MRS. DANE'S DEFENSE 

August 19 — Daniel Frohman's Company, in Lady Huntworth's 

EXPBHIMBNT. 

Q I ^ . TL-_1_- Bklasco & Thall. Managers. 

r\icazar l neatre. PhoneMain 254 

Commencing Monday, August 12th. FLORENCE ROBERTS, 
Supported by White Whittlesey and the Alcazar Stock Company, 
in Charlotte Thompson's New Play. 

SILVER MOUNTED HARNESS 

An Artistic Triumph. The Beautiful Terpsichorean Conception, 

"The Flowers in the Storm." Nothing like it ever seen before. Sur- 
passes description. 

Only Matinee— Saturday. Seats on sale six days in advance. 
Prices— 15c, 25c, 35c, 50c, and 75c 

TI»/-n 1 1 C\rt**--L f— I «. .<-.« Maa - Ernebtine Keeling. 
I VOl I Upera (lOUSe. Proprietor and Manaeer. 

Evenings at 8 sharp! Matinee Saturday at 2 sharp! 
To-night. TROUATORE; To-morrow night, LUCIA, 
Monday, Aug. 12th. Third Week! Two Great Operatic Offerings! 
Monday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday, Donizetti's master- 
piece, LA FAV/ORlTA, with Agostinl in role the of "Fernando." 
His First Appearance at this House. 

Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday matinee, and Sunday. Verdi's brilliant 
opera. Of HELLO. First Time at this House of Linda Montanarl, 
in the role of "Desdemona." 
Popular prices— 25, 50, and 75 cents. Telephone Bush 9. 

0_ L — . . _ San Francisco's Greatest MuBto Hall. 

rpneum. 



O'Farrell St.. between Stockton and Powell streets. 



Week commencing Sunday August 11th. Charles H. Bradshaw & 
Co., Remarc & Riley, Hill & J-ilvainy, Mr. & Mrs. Alfred Kelcey, 
Sisson, Wallace & Co., The Standard Quartette. New Views by the 
Biograph, and last appearances of 

ALEXANDRA DAGMAR 

Reserved Seats 25o.; balcony 10b.; opera chairs and box seats, 50. 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 



After the Theatre 



Go where the orowd goes—to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the finest 

wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zlnkand is society's gathering place after the theatre 

over 



Bethesda 



to swim in." 



"I've prescribed 
enough . . . 

— Dr. Shbady, 274 Lexington avenue. New York 

L. CAHEN & SON, Agents, Wholesale Liquer Dealers, 

Send for Pamphle **I8 Sacramento Street, 



Brushes 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, billiard 
tables, brewers, book binders, candy-makers, canners, 
dyers, flour mills, foundries, laundries, paper-hang- 
ers, printers, painters, shoe factories, stable men, tar- 
roofers tanners, tailers, etc. 

BUCHANAN BROS. 

Brush Manufacturers, 609 Sacramento street. San Francisco. Tel. 561 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 10, 1901. 



Library&able 




£■>*•''-■■ ■■ 



tibf: 




Mrs. Burton Harrison has for the nonce 
A Princess of wandered far afield from her usual pen 
the Hills. haunts for the setting for her recent 

novel, "A Princess of the Hills." It is 
neither a romance of Colonial days nor of modern New 
York society, but a story of Italy, full of descriptive 
bits set down by one who is evidently a traveler keenly 
appreciative of the moving scences of Nature, and knowing 
well how to endow them with interest for her readers. It 
deals mainly with the amatory experiences of an American 
tourist who in Venice suddenly cuts himself loose from his 
fiancee,, whose whims, whiles and exactions had brought to 
him temporarily a smarting disillusionment. He seeks 
surcease from the recollections of his broken engagement 
in the solitude of that section of the North Italian Alps 
known as the Dolomites. Here he meets a daughter of the 
soil, striking in form and feature, the last of a once noble 
race, but now a humble peasant girl, — a real princess of the 
hills. Captivated by her beauty he at last leads her to the 
altar. At the moment the marriage mass is about to begin 
she throws herself into the arms of her soldier lover — the 
only master of her heart — whom she had long believed 
faithless, but who opportunely returns just in time to pre- 
vent her union with the "Americano." By a curious chance 
his discomfiture in the church is witnessed by his former 
fiancee, who ultimately consoles him for the loss of the 
capricious princess of the hills, La Bella Fiore, the last of 
the Marcolini. The main charm of the book lies, however, 
not so much in its somewhat fanciful love tale as in its 
wealth of local color, its pictures of life amid the Italian 
hills, the snow-capped peaks, the flowers, the sunshine — a 
fair region steeped in history and adventure. Of this par- 
ticular and very interesting section of the Italian Alps, Mrs. 
Harrison writes: "To the Europe of later days and to the 
general tourist, this region, rich in beauty and productive- 
ness, remained comparatively unknown, until a French 
mineralogist named Dolomieu called the attention of the 
scientific world to the fantastic forms, the glorious coloring, 
and the structural peculiarities of its wondrous peaks, and 
received in return the honor of standing sponsor for tin- 
name by which he is now generally known, 'the Dolomii 
The illustrations are by Orson Lowell. 
Lothrop Publishing Company, Boston. Price $1.50. 

The Jewish The first volume of "The Jewish Ency- 
Encyclopedia. clopedia," an undertaking the prelim- 
inary work of which has been carried 
on for the past thre^ years, has just been issued. When com- 
plete the work will comprise twelve volumes, which it is 
estimated will aggregate eight thousand pages, with about 
two thousand illustrations, many of which will be richly 
colored. Dr. Emil G. Hirsch, the chief rabbi of me Chicago 
Sinai Congregation, commends this work in no uncertain 
terms. "No man or woman of general culture," he says, 
"can afford to ignore a publication of this order. Judaism 
has played a vital part in the destinies of men. Jewry is 
to-day a mighty force in the development of civilization." 
Dr. Jacob Voorsanger, the eminent rabbi of our own city, 
was among the first to pronounce on the importance of this 
Encyclopedia and speaks of it as "the facile, didactic, col- 
lective work of several hundred competent scholars, each 
of whom knows he is writing for the people." The projector 
of this magnns opiis is Dr. Isadore Singer, who has spent ten 
years of his life in collecting material for it. He 
Austrian by birth and a linguist of exceptional ability. Tin- 
typographical appearance of the first volume leaves nothing 
to desire, and its colored plates are most attractive. As an 
exhaustive record of the history of the Jews from the time 
of Abraham to the present day the work, when completed, 
should be welcomed by both Jew and Gentile. 

Funk & Wagnalls Co.. Publishers, New York. Price per 
volume, $7.00. 



From the comparatively unknown 
The Potter and the Clay, rendering of a verse from the 

Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, and 
which ij to be found only the the first edition of Fitzgerald's 
translation of the Persian poem, Maud Howard Peterson 
has taken the title of her book "The Potter and the Clay." 

"For in the Market-place, one Dusk of Day, 
I watch'd the Potter thumping his wet clay: 

And with its all-obliterated Tongue 
It murmur' d — 'Gently, Brother, gently, pray!'" 

It is an attractive title, albeit not especially pertinent to 
the story. The prologue introduces the reader to Cary, the 
small daughter of an American Lieutenant at a frontier fort, 
where she has for playmates two English lads — cousins — 
John Stewart and Robert Trevelyan. In a boating excursion 
they very nearly meet an untimely end, and Cary in conse- 
quence falls dangerously ill. The devotion of the two boys 
for their little seven-year-old companion is the fore-runner 
of a romance that Miss Peterson has wrought out with com- 
mendable merit, when the fact is taken into consideration 
that it is her first novel. Grown to manhood and officers in 
the British Army, John Stewart and Robert Trevelyan meet 
again in England the young American girl who has appealed 
so strongly to their boyish fancies. The latter receives 
orders for Indian service and later Stewart follows him. The 
contrasting natures of the two men, the one self-poised, the 
other of unsettled soul, and the fine character of the heroine 
are well drawn. Love makes of Trevelyan a coward for <• 
brief moment and that he may not be sent on a dangerous 
mission and perhaps never again see the woman he loves, 
he shirks his duty and shoots himself, wounding himself 
slightly. At last realizing the hopelessness of his passion, 
he determines to redeem himself in his own eyes and suc- 
cumbs to cholera while fighting the scourge, happy to thus 
serve the men who served England, and give his life for 
his country. 

The end of the story can be surmised. Cary promises to 
marry Stewart and as he at least does not seem to need any 
especial "thumping" to mould him into shape, "mid this 
dance of plastic circumstance," it is to be hoped that they 
jived happily ever after. The illustrations by Charlotte 
Harding are mediocre. 

Lothrop Publishing Co., Boston. Price $1.50. 

Not only to the musical fraternity 
Mandolin Memories, but to the general public as well, 

Mr. Samuel Adelstein's recently pub- 
lished booklet, "Mandolin Memories," will, because of its 
practical information, prove of special interest. It tells 
of the standing of the plectrum instruments among the 
musicians of the musical centers of Europe, and is a descrip- 
tive and practical treatise on the mandolin and kin- 
dred instruments The mandolin furore has spread 
all over Europe and even to the Orient and during 
the past twenty years no instrument has advanced so rapidly 
in popular favor. Guitarists and banjoists will be interested 
in Mr. Adelstein's descriptions of the Hawaiian Ukelele and 
Taro Patch, instruments which resemble very small guitars, 
and which are principally used as accompaniments to the 
sweet, plaintive Hawaiian airs and melodies, or to the native 
dances. The writer has traveled in many lands and has 
noted many of the musical peculiarities of plectrum 
instruments far and near. He affirms that the mandolin is 
more difficult to master than the violin, but that any earnest 
student of the mandolin will find as he delves deeper into 
the serious study of the instrument, with its extremely com- 
plicated mechanism, depths that were unthought of and 
undreamed of, and will unearth beauties of harmony that 
will both surprise and delight. 
Jos. Winterburn & Co., San Francisco, Cal. 

MARY E. BUCKNALL. 



BOOKS REVIEWED IN THIS PAPER 
Can be Obtained at 



Robertson's 



126 Post Street 



August 10, 1901 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 




So quietly has Lord Deerhurst come upon the scan" 
few people have a chance to realize that a really important 
person is in town. He is a jolly, democratic English gi 
man, and extremely fond of all kinds of sports. He married 
Miss Bonynge, who brought him a very large "dot." which 
be spends with the generosity of the English swell. Mr. 
Richard Tobin and all those anxious to perfect their English 
accent, follow him about and listen to his words as if in- 
spired. To their dismay they find that they have not the 
real thing. Already Burlingame is dropping its "g's," for 
Lord Deerhurst always says "howlin'." "tearin'," "rippin'," 
etc., which is the smart thing in London. 

Mr. Porter Ashe was introduced to Lord Deerhurst the 
other day, and giving the Britisher the most cordial greeting, 
he said: 

"I am very glad to have the honor of shaking the hand 
of a member of the British nobility, and I hope you appre- 
ciate the honor of taking the hand of a State Senator of 
California." 

Lord Deerhurst thinks that Mr. Porter Ashe is the wittiest 
man in the State. 

* * * 

Since fame has been arriving in a more dignified form, 
Mr. Gelett Burgess has been doing his level best to live 
down "The Purple Cow," that improbable animal which the 
poet declared some years ago in the "Lark" that he had 
never seen and never hoped to see. Mr. Burgess wants it 
generally understood that he can write more ambitious 
pieces than "The Purple Cow," and he has become so touchy 
on the subject that he takes it as a personal affront when 
you accuse him of ever having had anything to do with the 
rearing of that plum colored bossie. The phantom, however, 
still continues to haunt Mr. Burgess in one form or another, 
and this month it has sprung up again in a department of 
Current Literature called "Ballads of Bedlam" and supposed 
to embody the best nonsense verse in the language. The 
Poet's Corner of the Bohemian Club has gotten ahold of 
this last appearance of "The Purple Cow" and they are mak- 
ing the author's life a burden by continual reference to that 
tabooed subject, and in order to properly do the occasion 
justice one of their number has sung as follows: 

Burgess, of old we heard you vow 
You'd never seen a purple cow, 
And that you never hoped to see one, 
Although you'd rather see than be one. 

Since that rash vow you've seen the beast 
Six hundred times a week at least, 
And now where'er you look or turn 
That bossie's ardent colors burn. 

Now you'd be happy, could you vow 
You'd never seen "The Purple Cow," 
And though it isn't nice to he one, 
I bet you'd rather be than see one. 

* * * 

There was a prisoner at the bar who had confessed his 
crime and was pleading for mercy before the austere Judge 
Dunne, and the Judge harkening to the plea had all but un- 
bended when the court room door swung open and a breezy 
reporter blew in. 

"Anything doing, Judge?' 1 he whispered, as he approached 
the bench. 

"Nothing much," answered the Judge, forgetting the 
prisoner. "How is the strike coming on?" 

" 'Bouc the same," answered the news man, "except for 
the trouble in the dry-goods stores." 

"The dry-goods stores!" exclaimed the Judge, "what hap- 
pened there?" 

"Nothing much," replied the reporter. "There's a sympa- 
thy strike on, and all the union suits walked out." 

"Three years in San Quentin!" roared the court to the 



prisoner at the bar. 
Mr. T. Howard Taylor, in clipping 

.>rf ynr.i., of coupons in his offlce 111 i I.- building, 

had if : tiw Veracity Club 01 else mori 

telephone. In spit.- of Mr. Taylor' which is 

opulently given in the dirt londs, Mr. Taylor It) 

afflicted with a bill, a bad bill, an anj t bill, a broubli 
1111 which he refuses to pay. I. there came 

a ring at the Taylor telephone. Mr. Taylor answered the 
bell. 

"Hello." came a voice, "Is this Mr. Taylor's office?" 

"Yes," replied the proprietor, "what is wanted?" 

"This is Jones," said the voice, "I called you up to ask If 
I could see Mr. Taylor about that little bill." 

"Mr. Taylor is not in," responded the truthful Mr. Taylor 
with promptitude. 

"When will he be in?" asked the voice. 

"He is out of town to be gone a week," replied the other, 
without the remotest regard for the recording angel. 

"Is that so?" inquired the voice impudently. "If that is 
the case, Mr. Taylor, you had better move your telephone 
away from the window. I am standing at my window across 
the street and can see every move you make. 

"Moreover I am not Jones," continued the inquisitorial 
voice. "I am your very good friend Charlie and I just 
called you up to ask if you wouldn't come down for a drink." 

Mr. Taylor took the next elevator down, but his friend 
got even by not showing up to pay for the drink. 



If the tales the students tell be true, either President 
Benjamin Ide Wheeler will have to change his future plans 
or he will become a very dear enemy of Dr. Taylor, dean of 
the Hastings Law College, and others equally eminent in 
that institution. It is Dr. Wheeler's intention that the State 
University shall have a law school of its own, so I am given 
to understand, and he has already done some missionary 
work in the way of conferring with the best talent in the 
Hastings faculty. That those in power in the law school 
resent the actions of the President of the State University, 
I have seen demonstrated to my own satisfaction. Some of 
them have even gone so far as to accuse the President of 
setting his cap to win away the Hastings talent for his new 
school and to leave the older college in the lurch. The more 
conservative members, however, scout the idea of losing 
valuable men to the State. 

"Oh, no, Wheeler won't get any good professors away 
from us," said Registrar Leonard Stone to me. "We are per- 
fectly willing to let Berkeley have our second rate talent, 
Dut we will make it worth while for our best men to stay 
where they are. We intend to make this the best law col- 
lege in the West." 

Just the same it is a well defined rumor that Dr. Wheeler 
does not believe in the idea of affiliated colleges and would 
not grieve if the Hastings school were moved across the 
bay. These are some of the reasons given by the students 
why the Dean of Hastings and the President of Berkeley 
are apt to feel cold toward each other in the future. 
* * * 

I heard not long ago of how Mr. Walter Martin once ex- 
tracted Mr. Frank Goad and some other Harvard boys from 
financial difficulties, and I think his inventive powers de- 
serve an eulogy. 

Several of the college men had just drawn large sums from 
their parents preparatory to returning home to San Fran- 
cisco. They had a "tip" on the races, a sure thing, ten to one, 
and they determined to show their governors how profoundly 
they had studied finance. So they invested everything they 
had but their railway tickets. Like most sure things their 
horse was among the "also rans." But they courageously 
started for home. 

On .the train they encountered Mr. Walter Martin and his 
mother, and they felt that Providence had a special eye 
for them. Instantly Mr. Martin asked them to dine with 
him, so they were rescued from starvation for one day, 
but even the best dinner cannot alay hunger for more than 
twenty-four hours. So one member of the party was dele- 
gated to ask Mr. Martin for money enough to supply them 
with food for the next four days. 

It seems that Mrs. Martin was displeased with her son, 
and he had not even a quarter. He turned his pockets 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 10, 1901. 



inside out, and said, "I am sorry, boys; mother won't let me 
have any money, but I will borrow it o£ her. She will lend 
it to you." 

Walter promised faithfully that his mother should never 
know why they were in need of funds. So he started for 
his mother's drawing room. 

Mrs. Martin was full of sympathy. "But, Walter," said 
she, "what did they do with their money? Do they drink?" 

"No." 

"How did they lose it, then?" 

Walter was inspired. "Why, mother, the car windows were 
open when they were counting their bills, and they blew out 

and were lost." 

* * * 

Prof. Schilling, the new head of the German Depart- 
ment at the State University, is a dapper, military looking 
man with clothes of most unacademic neatness. All of 
President Wheeler's additions to the Berkeley teaching 
force are good dressers. President Jordan is seedy beyond 
even the license of a philosopher and it is seldom that his 
trousers plead guilty to a crease. His favorite costume is 
a black sack suit, square-toed black shoes and a slouch hat. 
Not so with the President of the sister university. "Banjo- 
Eyed" dresses according to the chart and the most informal 
dress in which he allows himself to be seen is a gray King 
Edward. With him current dress assumes the dignity of a 
religious tenet. He believes that the members of the 
faculty should set a wholesome example in matters of dress 
to the students and refuses to employ any one not up to the 
proper sartorial standard. It is told that a young graduate 
called on him to "strike for a job" in the English Depart- 
ment. The young graduate had worked his way through the 
university and was not attired in raiment of the proper 
haut ton. President Wheeler read the eulogistic letters of 
recommendation, then looked the applicant over from head 
to foot. 

"I cannot fill up the faculty," he finally delivered himself, 
"with young men who have only the bachelor's degree. But 
I'll consider you when you get a doctor's degree — and a 
new suit of clothes." 

* * * 

Not long ago a well-known society bud asked an artillery 
officer, stationed at the Presidio, if he would please lend 
her a full dress uniform "just over night, you know." The 
lequest was made so prettily and was accompanied by so 
many blushes that the soldier surrendered without a strug- 
gle and the uniform was borne away in triumph. It seems 
that on the same day five other society maidens equally 
well-known and equally blushing were also touching their 
brothers and sweethearts for articles of swell male attire. 
The occasion was a bachelor girls' dinner which was given 
at the residence of one of our local 500. The table was set 
for twelve, half of whom were "men" and half of whom were 
"girls." The "men" carried out their parts the best, I am 
told, and punished the wine like regular devils. They were 
game through and through and even made a bluff at the 
cigars after dinner — and it was at this stage in the proceed- 
ings that the tragic hitch occurred. When the cigars were 
being passed it was noticed that the negro servants who 
had waited at the board were growing quite insubordinate. 
There was a flash of recognition from one of the "men," a 
scream, and the cat was irrevocably out of the bag. The 
really, truly men who had furnished the clothes for the 
occasion had followed up the clew, put on a coat of burnt 
cork and hired out for the evening. Moral: If girls will be 
boys let them take the consequences. 
* * * 

Mr. David Sachs, the millionaire manager of the great 
Sachs estate, has a fad and it is camping, hunting, and 
roughing it generally. With some friends of similar taste 
he often explores the wilds of California, and it is no un- 
usual thing for him to find himself a hundred miles from a 
railroad or many miles from a stage line. 

Last summer he was in the northern part of the State 
hunting. The guide told him there was excellent sport a 
little way from the stage route. So the party started with 
horses, and they found that the "little way" was more than 
sixty miles. 

On the journey they stayed over night at the house of a 
young woman of the mountains whose husband had gone to 



the Klondike. She gave the hunters an excellent dinner, 
for which they paid her liberally. When they left in the 
morning she asked of Mr. Sachs: 

"Where do you come from, Mr. Sachs?" 

"San Francisco," answered he. 

"Then I have a very great favor to demand of you. When 
you gentlemen come back here, I will ask you to do some- 
thing for me when you go to the city." 

The hunters were curious as to what her request was to 
he. but hoped it would not be too extravagant. Upon their 
return Mr. Sachs said: 

"Well, madam, what can I do for you?" 

The answer was, "Will you please go to a Protestant or- 
phan asylum and get me a girl baby about a month old, 
with blue eyes, and send her to me. I am lonely." 

Mr. Sachs was startled into consent, and that was why 
lie bore an anxious, paternal look for some time after his 
return. He kept his promise, and found the prettiest girl 
baby imaginable, and sent it to the lady in the mountains. 

* * * 

Mr. "Tom" Williams and his bride are doing the Buffalo 
Exposition before coming to their new home in Oakland. 
His friends are wondering if Mrs. Williams will cause a 
change to be made in his manage. There are some customs 
of his bachelor days that might strike terror to the heart of 
a sweet, gentle woman such as Mrs. Williams, and one is 
that of serving revolvers as the first course for breakfast. 

It must not be supposed that Mr. "Tom" Williams did 
this because he is an out-and-out fire-eater, but rather from 
the etiquette then prevalent in the bachelor abode. Every 
one who knows Mr. Williams is aware that he is always 
armed, although I believe he has never done any damage 
with his pistol. His life has been threatened so often that 
he feels it a wise precaution to take. 

In the old days when his friends indulged in an after-din- 
ner game of cards in his house Mr. Williams arose, deposited 
his revolver in a drawer, and turning to his guests, asked: 

"Gentlemen, will you do the same?" 

None hesitated, and the guests being disarmed cards al- 
ways proceeded peacefully. 

In the morning with his coffee each gentleman received 
his revolver. 

• * * 

The famous California Club stands, as of course everyone 
knows, for civic improvement, and with its help San Fran- 
cisco is to become in time a shining example of uncorrupted 
municipal Government. The several ladies of the club en- 
tertain several theories as to how this change is to be 
wrought, and some of the theories, it must be confessed, 
are fearfully and wonderfully constructed. Mrs. Morris 
Newton is a prominent and enthusiastic California Club 
woman. A short time ago she was visiting a fellow member 
and the two ladies were discussing methods for improving 
their native town. 

"Yes," said Mrs. Newton, "I believe with Mrs. Swift that 



•••••#»•«• 




DE WAR'S 



SCOTCH WHISKY 

High Ball 

Small piece of ice in glass, pour Whisky over 
ice, and fill glass with siphon or plain water. 

A COOLING AND DELIGHTFUL DRINK 



Gray Bros. 



228 Montuomery Street, Sun Francisco. 
205 New Hich Street, Los Anceles. 

Concrete and artificial 
stone work. 



August 10, .1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



women should know more about politics than the] do; f'.r." 
added Mrs. Newton, impressively. "It is ti 
that rocks the cradle roles the deep." 

No doubt the truth of that statement is very evident to 
California Club members, who understand all about civic 
improvement, but to outsiders It's a bit obscure. 



Mr. IMwin Cawston. proprietor of the ostrich farm in 
South Pasadena, Is a man with a commercial Instinct. If the 
UUrich Farm doesn't succeed it won't be for lack of advertis- 
ing. He doesn't take even his love affairs straight, but 
mixes business with them. 

He has lately married his third wife, and will, at the end 
of the honeymoon, bring her home to the cottage among the 
ostriches. 

During the engagement he presented her with a i 
yard boa worth forty dollars, and there the presents stopped, 
Hut he hau a surprise in store. 

It came the day before the wedding. It was a set ot 
Ostrich Farm souvenir spoons, with a full-fledged, long- 
legged, long-necked bird engraved on the bowl of each 
spoon. 

"Let t-iese be used, dear, at the wedding breakfast," were 
the directions accompanying them. 

This was where the mother-in-law to-be stepped in. Mrs. 
Doran said she wasn't going to advertise any ostrich farm 
in her house. If they wanted to do that sort of thing after 
they were in their own home, all right. 

So the souvenir breakfast was put off until the couple's 
return from abroad. 



OBSERVATIONS. 



By the Street-Corner Philosopher. 



THE PASSING OF THE SWORD. 

Prehistoric man used a club for the demolition of his 
enemies. He wore the skins of wild animals — when he 
wore anything — and went into battle without thought of 
pomp or glory. As he advanced in civilization his sartorial 
ideas developed, his clothing became more elaborate, and his 
weapons degenerated in size. Steel was invented, and of it 
sharp instruments were made — swords, battle-axes and 
spears, 'ihey were wonderfully effective at short range, hut 
when gun-powder was perfected it destroyed their usefulness. 
The spears and battle-axes were relegated to the background. 
But the sword — well, it was light, could be carried handily, 
and was, above all, ornamental. Men were beginning to pay 
some attention to the vanities. The sword recommended it- 
self as a badge of authority, which would be, at the same 
time, an adornment. And the vanity of man has caused it to 
be retained by army officers up to the present time. "Wav- 
ing his sword" has been a favorite descriptive phrase, and 
the pathos of the line, "My father's sword and mine" has 
caused many a tear in country schoolhouses. But it is ap- 
proaching a sure doom. The British dismounted officers in 
South Africa have been ordered to lay aside their swords and 
carry carbines instead. It is a wise move. Seldom does 
a Britisher get close enough to a Boer to use a sword on 
him. Then, too, it is in line with the reforms that the grim 
reality of war has brought about in the British army. One 
of the practices of the English officers in South Africa has 
been to make themselves easy marks for the enemy by 
wearing spectacular looking 'clothing. Now, except for the 
shoulder straps, their uniforms are the same as those worn 
by "Tommy." It is all a sad blow to British pride, but it 
helps to decrease the death list of officers. The sooner the 
British learn to fight the enemy in the enemy's own style, 
the better it will be for them. With a stubbornness that 
one cannot help admiring, they cling to their own way of do- 
ing things. When they learn — as they seem to be learn- . 
ing — to crawl up on the Boer, regardless of injury to the 
good looks of a uniform, or of a sacrifice of their dignity, 
they will have accomplished much. It is grand, it is brave, 
it is spectacular, to stand up and receive Boer bullets — 
but it prolongs the war. 



Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 

nrespoison oak and all skin diseases. Sold by all druggists. 



Don't drink Jesse Moare Wklekey unless you want the best. 



The Commuter. 
How he doth wear his weight of care, 

A martyr worried, though sublime, 
As If the throes of trials and woes 

Had made him old before his t i 1 1 1 • - . 

With glance discreet be walks the street 
And bundles carries as he goes, 

And twice the block consults the clock 
To see how soon tne next boat goes. 

We city folk may josh and joke 

And laugh at time's elusive flight, 
Our only jars are thoughts of cars 
That run till one o'clock at night. 

We may be glad, but he is sad; 

The thoughts of him are far away, 
As like as not, in his home cot 

In suburbs far across the bay. 

The wicked wights who see the sights 

And do the city by the glim, 
And strive to shine along the line, 
In no wise they appeal to him. 

A ghost, in faith, a nightmare wraith, 
Before his ever watchful eyes, 

Unpleasantly, incessantly, 

He sees the Ferry Clock arise. 

* * * * * * 

With failing breath, nigh unto death, 

In pleasant home across the bay. 
Worn out at last and hope all past, 
A wasted, wan commuter lay. 

Although each friend beheld his end 

Lamenting long and tearfully, 
He didn't show a sign of woe 

But looked on death quite cheerfully. 

At last he drew a breath or two, 
Then called a watcher to his side, 

his features took a worried look — 

"There goes my boat!" he said, and died. 



Pears' 

To keep the skin clean 
is to wash the execretions 
from it off ; the skin takes 
care of itself inside, if not 
blocked outside. 

To wash it often and 
clean, without doing any 
sort of violence to it re- 
quires a most gentle soap, 
a soap with no free alkali 
in it. 

Pears', the soap that 
clears but not excoriates. 

Sold all over the world. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 10, 1901. 




The other side of the bay has had almost a monopoly of 
weddings this week. Two of them were on Tuesday, one in 
Oaklan„ and the other in Alameda, where at the home of 
the bride, at two o'clock, Miss Idalene Hooper and Mr. Sum- 
ner Crosby were united in marriage by the Rev. Dr. Mac- 
kenzie. Neither bride nor groom had any attendants, only 
„ limited number of friends being present at the ceremony. 

The much-talked-of, eagerly anticipated Oakland society 
wedding of Miss Elizabeth Gage and Mr. W. H. Richardson, 
Jr., of Austin, Texas, came off on Tuesday evening, and was 
a most charming affair. White and green were the tints 
chosen as the distinctive colors, with a vivid pink" here 
and there to brighten the whole, and the general effect was 
delightful. The floral decorations were most elaborate, the 
wedding bell under which the vows of the happy young 
couple were exchanged being a marvel of construction, in 
which white flowers alone were used. This was placed in 
the bow window of the library. Punctually at half past 
eight the bridal party appeared and took their stand under 
the bell where Rev. Robert Ritchie, rector of St. Paul's Church 
performed the ceremony. Congratulations followed, and 
then the guests were bidden to the nuptial feast, which was 
spread on tables in a tent erected on the spacious lawn. 
This was most beautifully hung with ropes of green foliage, 
white and pink roses and sweet peas and numerous hanging 
baskets, myriads of pink-shaded lanterns and incandescent 
lamps giving brilliancy to the scene. The bridal table was 
set around a large pepper tree, and here the happy pair 
and their attendants, with a few intimate friends, were 
seated. The bride's gown was an exquisite creation of ivory 
white satin draped with tulle and point lace caught in fes- 
toons on the long train, with bouquets of orange blossoms. 
The yoke of the bodice was entirely of point lace, as were the 
sleeves, while the floating tulle veil was fastened to' her coif- 
fure with real orange blossoms and a sunburst of diamonds, 
the gift of the groom. Her bouquet was of lilies of the 
valley and orange blossoms tied with tulle streamers. Miss 
Rose Naile, who officiated as maid of honor, wore white 
crepe de chine over white silk. The flowers ror corsage, 
hair and bouquet were maiden-hair ferns. The six attend- 
ant bridesmaids, Misses Mabel and Ethel Gage, Chrissie 
Taft, Amy Scoville, Ruth Dunham, and Belle Nicholson, wore 
gowns of Nile-green taffeta, covered with crepe de chine 
of the same hue, with pink roses and sweet peas in hair 
and bouquets. Mr. George Gage supported the groom as best 
man, and Messrs. George Gross and Cornell Bowman per- 
formed the duties of ushers. Music was furnished by a 
stringed orchestra hidden behind a mass of palms and 
terns. The newly married pair will take a honeymoon trip 
through the State, returning here for Miss Ethel Gage's 
wedding ere taking up their residence in their future abode, 
Austin, Texas. 

The sole city wedding of note this week took place on 
Wednesday afternoon when Miss Eva Herold became the 
bride of Dr. Westphal.the Rev. Jacob M. Beuhler tying their 
nuptial knot at St. Paul's Lutheran church on Eddy street 
at six o'clock. It was another simple ceremonial. Neither 
of the young people had any attendants, relatives and a few 
friends only being present at the ceremony. Dr. and Mrs. 
Westphal left the same evening for British Columbia, 
where they will spend their honeymoon. After a brief 
trip further East they will return to San Francisco, and will 
reside on Haight street. 

There will be an army wedding next week when Miss 
Mordecai and Captain C. P. Summeral, U. S. A.. wi.l be the 
bride and groom. The ceremony is to be performed at Be- 
nicia Arsenal, at noon on Wednesday nest, and the Govern- 
ment tug McDowell will convey the guests from the city. 

Another army wedding of the month will be that of Miss 
Julia Sharp and Captain Denis Nolan, U. S. A., which is set 
for the 20th of August. Miss Sharp is one of the most popu- 



lar "army girls" San Francisco society has known in many a 
year. It will be quite a loss when she accompanies her 
husband to his new post, West Point, whither they depart 
immediately after their marriage. 

September 15th is now the date set for the Oelrichs- 
Martin marriage at Newport. Mrs. Eleanor Martin, who 
goes East for the ceremony, will be accompanied by Miss 
Jennie Blair, and both ladies are to be the guests of Mrs. 
Herman Oelrichs. 

San Francisco confesses to a surprise this week in the 
marriage in Boston of Mrs. May smith Janin and Mr. Harry 
Mendel, for which the San Francisco friends of bride and 
groom were quite unprepared. 

The Judson tea given last Saturday in Oakland in honor of 
Mrs. Wetherbee, her sister, Mrs. Farnham, and the East- 
ern guests now visiting her, was a particularly pleasant one. 

Entertainments in compliment to the prospective brides, 
Miss Bessie Gage and Miss Ida Belle Palmer, have been very 
frequent. Mrs. Edson Adams' luncheon, at which Miss Pal- 
mer was chief guest was greatly enjoyed. Mrs. O. F. Long has 
been one of Miss Palmer's dinner hostesses, ana Miss Chris- 
sie Taft has given her a luncheon. The pink dinner given 
by Miss Alma Brown was the last of the many gatherings 
at which Miss Bessie Gage played chief guest prior to her 
marriage, though on that occasion her sister Miss Ethel 
shared the honors with her. 

The only dinner given recently in town of much formality 
was presided over by Mrs. A. H. Loughborough as hostess, 
and had Mr. Tomlinson of New York as guest of honor. 
Mrs. Eleanor Martin was hostess of a large theatre party 
at the Columbia on Monday night, her guests previously 
dining with her at the University Club. 

In stagdom the chief recent events were the midsummer 
jinks of the Bohemian Club at their grove near Guerneville, 
and the clam bake, followed by a musical jinks, by the Cor- 
inthian Yacht Club at their Tiburon quarters last Sunday. 

At tne Presidio and at San xtafael golfers are practicing 
day and evening for the various contests now so close at 
hand. Next Thursday will be a great day at Blingum, where 
will commence the golf tournament which is to decide 
whether Miss Caro Crockett will become the permanent 
owner of the Poniatowski cup, sne having won the tourna- 
ment last year. At Del Monte a golf tournament begins to- 
day, which will be continued on the 20th, and on the 21st 
a tournament will begin for the first women's amateur golf 
championship of the Pacific Coast. 

Cards and golf are the fad at the Hotel Rafael this sum- 
mer. Besides the larger games of euchre played in the hotel 
parlors, smaller gatherings in private rooms take place 
nightly, and some of the prizes won are very pretty. To-day 
there will be another tournament played on the golf links 
of the San Rafael Club, when the handsome prize provided 
by Mr. Graham Babcock will be competed for by ladies and 
gentlemen, both married and single. 

The following guests are registered at the Hotel Rafael: 
Mr. Truxton Beale, Mr. A. D. Hi rschf elder, Mr. G. L. Edie 
and wife, Mr. H. M. Calhoun, Mayor J. D. Phelan, Mr. A. Sil- 
verberg, Mr. C. G. Lyman and wife, Master E. Lyman, Mr. 
A. M. Jones, Mr. Daniel Boone, Mr. E. H. Rix, Mr. G. H. Bow- 
man, Mr. L. O. Entritt, Mr. Philip C. Meyer and wife, Mr. 
C. C. Perkins, Mrs. C. C. Perkins, Mr. L. C. Babln and wife. 
Mr. D. C. Tousey and wife. 

The Misses Alice and Ethel Hager will complete a pleasant 
quartette who sail for Japan on the 27th, the others being 
Miss Alice Rutherford and Mrs. Bufbrd. 

Miss Gertrude Eels, Mr. and Mrs. Mayo Newhall, and 
Mrs. Lillie Coit are among the Californians who have re- 
cently crossed the Atlantic and are safe on European shores. 
Miss Bessie Bowie has been making a tour of the German 
baths with Mr. and Mrs. Will Tevis; her father, Mr. A. J. 
Bowie, the mining expert, is on his way home from the 
Philippines. Captain and Mrs. Lyman and Mr. and Mrs. 
James Otis are among recent arrivals at the Hotel Rafael: 
Mrs. Head and Miss Anna have gone to Lake Tahoe to spend 
the month of August; Mrs. E. B. Coleman and her son are 
aiso there at present; Mrs. Bowie Detrick has been visit- 



August 10, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



13 



Ing Mrs. J. I.. Flood at their pretty home in the San' 
Mountains. Miss Jennie Flood and Mr. Allan li- 
the party. 

The Goethe-Schiller monument will be unveiled at Golden 
Gate Park Sunday at two o'clock, with appropriate 
monies. Literary exercises in commemoration of the event 
will be neld at Native Sons' Hall at eight o'clock Sunday 
evening. 

A wedding of much interest to San Francisco society is 
that of Miss Lila Jones of Charlotte, N. C, and Mr. Francis 
Brugulere, which will take place next Thursday at the 
(. aarlotte home of the bride's parents. Colonel and Mrs. 
Hamilton Jones. 

The following are among recent guests at Pacific Con- 
gress Springs: Miss E. Roberts, Mr. George Richmond. 
Mr. Tom Corum, Mr. A. Schroder, Miss B. Byrene, Miss E. 
McDonald, Mr. A. J. Salazar, Mrs. F. S. Mitchell, Mrs. R. 
Morris, Mr. Gustav Gutsch, Mrs. M. Gutsch, Mrs. A. Johnson, 
Mrs. E. F. Schneider and wife, Mr. C. Lisser and wife, Mr. 
A. Maepas, Mr. J. McCarthy, Mrs. McCarthy, Mr. ST. McCar- 
thy, Mr. James Addison, Mr. G. Livique, Mrs. Fred A. Hatch 
and child, Mrs. G. O. Jones, Miss M. Danvir, Mr. M. P. 
Holmes, Mr. N. R. Palmer, Miss Mattie Palmer, Mrs. Lirve, 
Mrs. Pricilla Cheeks, Mr. Robert Edgar, Mr. E. G. Jewitt 
and wife, Mr. A. P. Smith and wife, Miss Edith Browne, 
Mr. W. H. Krause, Mr. and Mrs. W. Mollar, Mr. and Mrs. 
A. W. Sutton, Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Green, Mr. and Mrs. J. 
W. Hutchinson, Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Schneider, Jr., Mr. and 
Mrs. C. C. Colidge, Mr. Crosby, Mr. Paul Masson, Mr. J. 
Hansen, Mr. and Mrs. T. Pollard, Jr., Miss J. Donovan, 
Mrs. F. H. Hammer, Miss E. Quinlan, Mr. J. W. HutchinsoD, 
Miss Morris, Mr. J. Bush and wife, Mr. M. M. Hoffman, 
Mr. S. N. Martin, Mr. Sam P. Hardy, Mr. F. A. Schneider, 
Mr. J. J. Myers, Mr. W. H. Clarke, Mr. S. C. \i allis, wife and 
child, Mr. A. H. Melletz, Dr. L. Logan Carr, Mrs. L. L. Carr, 
Mrs. Charles A. Wayland, Mrs. E. C. Rutherford, Mr. Francis 
H. E. O'Donnell, Mr. F. H. Lockyer, and Rabbi Friedlander. 

Dinner parties in the new Grill at Del Monte have been all 
the go since that new feature was established. 

A successful entertainment was given on Thursday nighi. 
at the Silver Street Boys' Library. A hundred youngsters 
"were present and enjoyed music and refreshments. The li- 
brary is maintained by Mrs. Hattie Crocker Alexander, 
who does much good in this and kindred enterprises. It is 
connected with the Silver Street Kindergarten, of which 
Miss Kate Banning is the head. Miss Ella Holmes is the li- 
brarian, and it is through her efforts chiefly that the enter- 
tainment of Thursday night was made a success. Her 
eminent fitness for the position, which involves the rather 
diflieult task of handling a great many unruly urchins, has 
been demonstrated by the growth of the library since she 
has had it in charge. 

Under the auspices of the Cymodorion Society of California 
Miss E. P. Hughes lectured at the Academy of Sciences Hall 
last evening on "The Development of Education in Wales 
During the Last Half Century." 

The week of sports at Dei Monte will bring together some 
of the golf champions of the North and South. Such noted 
Southern California players as Messrs. C. E. Maud, C. E. 
Orr, H. M. Sears, N. Wilshire, H. G. Wilshire, R. H. Hay, 
and Chapman and Walter Crosby, expect to contest with 
local players for some of the cups. Among the Southern 
ladies who will show their talent are Mrs. Bowers, Mrs. 
Hull, and Mrs. Sigmore, who will try conclusions with Mrs. 
Brown, Mrs. Sherwood, and other well-known San Francisco 
players. Major Rathbone's unceasing efforts have made the 
success. of this meeting assured. The following are among 
the guests now at Hotel Del Monte: 

Mr. J. K. Comstock, Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Richardson, Mr. 
and Mrs. C. L. Hamilton, Mrs. E. Wignall, Mrs. J.'H. Stal- 
lard, Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Heller, Miss B. Bachman, Mr. and 
Mrs. F. F. Ryer, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Parrott, Miss M. L. Par- 
rott, Miss Daisy Parrott, Miss O'Connor, Mrs. A. N. Towne, 
Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Worden, Mr. C. B. Alexander and family, 
Miss F. C. Low, Mrs. M. C. Low, Mr. and Mrs. W. Innis, Mr. 
and Mrs. J .J. Mack, Mayor J. D. Phelan, Mr. W. S. Hobart, 
Mr. C. A. Baldwin and family, Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Layton, 



Mrs Fred Zelle and fainil. B Cuchlng and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred TuM.s. Mrs, \ i. TubbB, Mr. an. I Mr». 
Francis Carolan, Mr. i: M. Oreenway, Mr. an. I Hi 
Kwing, Mr. and Mrs. a. Baruch, Mr. and Mn i Michaels, 
Mr. 0. \V. Willi, lm. Mrs. A. Williams, Mr. Tims. Hurle] 
Margaret Hurley, Miss Gertrude Hurley, Mr. .1. (). Tobln, Mr. 
Thomas Drisroll, Mr. K. M. Tobln, Mr. Charles licmphy. 
Miss Chabot. Mrs. M. A. Chabot, Mr. Downey Harvey, and 
family, Mr. and Mrs. S. Grinhuum. Mr. .1. A. Folger and 
family, Mr. C. R. Tobin, Miss McMullin, Miss Bindley. 

Gustav Frlederich, General Inspector of the branches of 
the London and San Francisco Bank, Limited, has returned 
from an extended trip to Europe. 

Mine. Julie Rosewald, who is at the Hotel Granada, corner 
of Sutter and Hyde streets, will be at home on Tuesday 
and Wednesday, August 14th and 15th, for the reception of 
pupils and the arrangement of hours. 

Major and Mrs. L. R. Burgess are to be stationed at the 
Presidio for some time to come. 

Miss Jennie Flood intends to open her California street 
mansion and entertain frequently during the coming sea- 
son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chauncey Winslow arrived from their trip 
East last Sunday; Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels is back in town 
from her home in the country, where she has been for the 
past few weeks; Mrs. Len Owens and Miss Ida Gibbons have 
returned from a six weeks' visit from Etna Springs; Mr. and 
Mrs. H. B. Chase and Colonel and Mrs. C. R. Greenleaf are 
among recent arrivals at the Hotel Pleasanton. The only 
son of our famous Admiral, D. G. Farragut, has been visiting 
San Francisco the past week, renewing old friendships and 
revisiting the scenes of his boyhood, Mr. Loyal Farragut 
having passed his earlier years at the Mare Island Navy 
Yard, when his gallant father was in command there. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Williams are en route home from their 
noneymoon trip to Europe; Mrs. E. F. Preston and her 
daughters, the Misses Edith and Norma, will return from 
their tour abroad early next month. 



Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. 

Cooper & Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 



Go where you will, the best saloons sell Jesse Moore Whiskey, 



You cannot ,« 

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There is a restful satisfaction in knowing that 
your underwear is just right. PFISTER'S UNDERWEAR 
is the "right" underwear. It is fashioned to the 
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close, but does not bind, giving comfort in every posi- 
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Pfister's Comfort Quartette 

LINURET, Pure Linen. BOriBYRET, Pure Silk. 
XYLORET, Pure Lisle. VILLURET, Pure Wool. 



Four of Nature's 
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The price "fits" 
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Underwear. 




KNITjriNGCO. 

60 Geary St., San Francisco, Cal. 



BLAKE, MOFFIT & TOWNE 



Telephone Main 199. 



... DEALERS IN PAPER 

Blake. Mofflt 4 Towne Los Angeles. 66-57-59-61 First street S. P 

Blake .McFall & Co. Port'snd Or 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 10, 1901. 




Oil promotion schemes seem to mul- 
Gold Bricks for tiply on the London market at a rate 
British Investors, which ought certainly to suggest cau- 
tion to investors, who invariably get 
caught in the "rush" which is sure to follow the development 
of any new line of business. First came the Texas Oil 
Fields, Ld., with the enormous capital of $1,875,000, and now 
we have the Anglo-Wyoming Oil Fields, Ld., which has 
just been registered with a capital of $1,500,000. British 
investors should bear in mind that there is quite enough 
money available in America to run any proposition of the 
kind that is worth picking up upon a legitimate basis, and 
that an appeal to their purses will result eventually in finan- 
cial loss. The promoters will make the money while the 
shareholders will come out of the small end of the horn. 
The majority of schemes to float American properties on 
the other side of the Atlantic are simply stock-jobbing opera- 
tions, a fact which can be very clearly established by re- 
viewing the result of investments in the western field during 
the past twenty years. There is no friendly feeling for 
Great Britain in America, no matter how much some people 
may prate about bonds of sympathy and other bosh of a 
similar nature, while to rob a Britisher of his money is an 
act of faith worthy of as high a reward as that earned by 
the Mussulman who can place the death of an infidel to his 
Celestial credit. This is now one of the creditor nations of 
the world, and the man who has to go abroad to beg money 
to carry on an enterprise can be safely charged with an in- 
ability to raise the necessary at home. In other words he is 
a prophet without honor in his own country. New York, 
Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia, and St. Louis are ready and 
willing to put up working capital for American mining 
investments, and when propositions of the kind are found 
cropping up in Great Britain it is reasonable to believe that 
the promoters either fought shy of an investigation by East- 
ern capitalists or have been turned down. 

One of the great London dailies that 
Brewery Shares at so strongly advocated the purchase 
a Discount. of American Breweries at the time 

when syndicating was the fashion, 
has finally arrived at the following conclusion: "English 
investors in American brewery companies have, one would 
think, had quite enough — and a little to spare — of those con- 
cerns. Yet it is announced from San Francisco, on the au- 
thority of a press agency, that a number of London finan- 
ciers have obtained control of the Los Angeles breweries, 
and that the syndicate will run the combined business on 
a capital of some £2,500,000. On top of this comes the 
announcement in another financial paper in that city that 
the latest report from the San Francisco breweries shows 
that the catalogue of misfortune in that branch of industrial 
enterprises is by no means exhausted. The annual 
statement is quoted to the effect that while the London ex- 
penses, debentures, interest etc., require £43,613, the trad- 
ing profit for the year is only £35,308, which means thnt the 
company made a loss of £S,000. The blame is principally 
assigned to the low selling prices for beer, while the hope 
is expressed that there will oe no further fall in prices. 
"This means," says our contemporary, "that an additional 
profit must come out of economies in administration, and 
teat is a desperate hope indeed. Possibly if the London 
expenses were cut down it might brighten matters up a 
bit." 

We hear that the Peerless Oil Company 

Big Contract is about closing a contract to deliver 

for Oil Delivery. 5,000,000 barrels of oil, and that the 

price is a paying one.' The contract, 

it is said, will extend over five years. This will entail the 

sinking of ten more wells on the company's property. We 

h pe to be in a position to give complete details of this very 

interesting transaction before long. 



Business has been dull with the brokers 
The Local on the local Stock and Bond Exchange 
Stock Market, during the past week, and the most of the 
trading on the industrial list has been 
in the gas stocks. There is a firmer undertone in these 
shares just now on the strength of the popular belief that 
a combination of the local companies is an assured fact, 
and only a matter of time. The proposition is one which 
seems to be based upon common sense and a due regard to 
the interest of shareholders. There should be no necessity 
tor the Gas and Electric Company to stop the payment of 
dividends if the lighting business of the city was running 
along as it should be. To run at a loss is something which 
cannot oe accepted as likely for any length of time, and 
that is what the companies one and all would have to face, 
if fighting was prolonged. It is reasonable to assume that 
the brains at the head of these extensive concerns will duly 
recognizj that peace is absolutely necessary for their wel- 
fare and success, and that the outcome of the present nego- 
tiations will be a union of their interests. With this happy 
consummation in view little money can be lost in holding 
the stock at present prices. Sugar stocks continue to de- 
cline, and some of them show already a shrinkage which 
is certainly unwarranted by conditions at the islands. The 
■ rest of the industrial list shows few changes, and bunds are 
firmly maintained under a good demand. In the dividend 
announcements for the week a reduction in the monthly rate 
of the Paauhau payment is noted from 30 cents to 20 cents. 
It is also said that while paying the regular 42 cents dividend 
this month Spring Valley will pass the payments for Septem- 
ber and October next. 

The situation continues hopeful at 
The Pine-St. Market, the south end of the lode, and the 
latest news from the joint drift 
now being run west is that crosscutting will soon com- 
mence. The Con.-Cal.-Virginia mine is also showing an im- 
provement as the work progresses southerly, and the bears 
have consequently failed to score on the announcement that 
the company would pass its dividend for the month. There 
have been some changes in the affairs of the Comstock 
Company Association. Hereafter the expense of pumping 
at the C. & C. shaft will be paid by six of the principal north- 
end companies, viz.: Consolidated Cal. & Virginia. Best & 
Belcher, Ophir, Mexican, Union Con., and Sierra Nevada. 
The other companies, hitherto subscribers, will continue in 
the association, but they have been released from all obli- 
gations, though they may resume their contributions at the 
original pro rata at any time. This is about all the news 
of the week on the street, the market remaining dull, with 
prices about the same. Best & Belcher, Sierra Nevada, and 
Mexican have just been assessed. 

While business in the market for oil 
The Prospects shares continues at a low ebb, there 
for Oil Shares. are indications that the tide is about 
to turn at last in favor of dealers who 
have held on during the dull times. The stocks of the lead- 
ing companies have a steadier tone and some quiet buying 
has been going on for days past. This would suggest a 
return of confidence, which is due in a large measure to 
the moral certainty that action will take place shortly to 
control the yield of oil in favor of the producer. An arrange- 
ment to this effect is nearing completion, and with it in 
operation many of the companies the shares of which have 
been dragging at bed-rock for a long time, should soon be on 
a self-sustaining basis. Work in the field is now going on 
steadily and quietly, and many new companies are branch- 
ing out. Some recent strikes in the territory south of the 
river in Kern has enthused the companies owning land there, 
and many drills will soon be at work in this new and promis- 
ing field. 

• People who own ground on